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M. R. Byrd

Okay, here is one along the Dodge City lines---

Who is the most recent "Honorary Marshal of Dodge City"?

He joins a list including JFK, Gerald Ford, Meadowlark Lemon, Roy Rogers, Tex Ritter, Hugh O'Brien, and about 80 others.

Hint: He becomes the first son of a prior Honorary Marshal to be pinned with a badge.

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Steve Sutton

The search for Earp's BUNTLINE SPECIAL is the Western equivalent of the Quest for The Holy Grail.   Fewer than 300 Colt Carriage Guns, (the original marketing name for them prior to the BUNTLINE tag), were made and contrary to popular belief they were not just extra long barreled Colt SSA's.   They were built on a heavier frame and had a flat top with an inletted cavity that housed a folding sight and a gas relief port that was supposed to solve the problem of lead fragments and gas exhaust out of the front of the cylinder when fired, (it did not).   They also included a skeletonized detachable stock with the intention being that the gun could be used as either a pistol or a rifle.   They came in 10", 12" and 18" barrel lengths and as can be seen by the low number made were not popular.

Apparantely Buntline gave Earp, Bat Masterson and two other Deputy's 12" barreled versions and while there is no evidence of Earp or Masterson using theirs, the other two recipiants had the barrels on theirs cut down to the 7-3/4" length of the Cavalry model SSA's, (a barrel length that while not the best for quick draw-something  that contrary to Hollywood Earp wasn't known for-but was well suited for his trade mark tactic of settling altercations by getting in close and using his pistol to club the opponent into unconsciousness-this tactic came to be known as "buffaloing").

Earp's Buntline was given to a friend of his in Alaska and to this day it's whereabouts is unknown.

Today the Buntline is known not because of actual use by Earp himself but because of the use of a 12" Colt SSA used by Hugh O'Brien in the starring  of Earp in THE LIFE AND TIMES OF WYATT EARP series.

The gun was far more popular the second time around even though it was nothing more than a 12" barreled SSA selling more than 3,000 before being discontinued.  

As the man said at the end of THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY VALANCE,

"When the Legend becomes fact print the legend"

Steve

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M. R. Byrd

May 2015

Dodge City's newest Honorary Marshal

IMG_5172-001_zpsabt8ucvw.jpg

Rex Allen was the first in 1952. There are about 85 total. Name another and I will supply the year.

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M. R. Byrd
The name of the Vaudevillian who arrived in Dodge City in 1878 for an extended stay where he met Doc Holliday, Bat Masterson and Wyatt Earp.
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M. R. Byrd
Excellent guess Steve, but not correct. This man went on to stardom as an American Stage Actor and musical comedy star.
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M. R. Byrd
Between 1901 and 1912, he played the leading comic roles in a series of musical comedies in New York City and on tour, including The Strollers (1901), The Wild Rose (1902), Mr. Bluebeard (1903), Piff! Paff! Pouf! (1904), The Earl and the Girl (1905), The Orchid (1907), Mr Hamlet of Broadway (1908/9), Up and Down Broadway (1910), and Over the River (1912). It was while on tour with Mr. Bluebeard that he became a hero of Chicago’s infamous Iroquois Theatre Fire, December 30, 1903.
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Steve Sutton

I knew as soon as I hit enter that for EARP and Holiday and Masterson to have been in Dodge City together that Fields would have been before Fields time....

You gave the clue I needed though....Eddie Foy......

Steve

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M. R. Byrd
He has a park named after him at the corner of Weyman Avenue and Pelham Road in New Rochelle, New York
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M. R. Byrd

Winner, winner, chicken dinner. Congratulations.

"When Eddie Foy, who was to become one of the greatest comedians of the day, arrived in Dodge in 1878 he was dressed pretty loud, had "a kind of Fifth Avenue swagger and strut", and made some distasteful jokes about cowboys at his first performance. Foy later said, "Had I known the West better then, I might have been more careful."

The next day, when Foy appeared on Front Street, the cowboys soon had him roped, put on horse's back and led the pony under a big tree near the river.

There, as he sat with rope around his neck, ready to be strung up, they had their fun. Sheriff Bat Masterson stood by ready to call "calf rope" if the play got too rough. But Eddie endured their hazing valiantly, determined to be nonchalant and not to let them think they were scaring him---even if they broke his neck. When they asked him what last words he had to say for himself, Eddie replied that he could say them better at the bar of the Long Branch Saloon. Says Eddie, "The whole affair ended in a laugh and a drink all around; that night I got more applause than ever and we stayed in Dodge all summer."

As Robert M Wright puts it, "They played pranks on him which Foy took with such good grace that he captured the cowboys completely. Every night his theatre was crowded with them. Nothing he could say or do offended them; but on the contrary, they made a little god of him. The good people of Dodge have watched his upward career with pride and pleasure, and have always taken a great interest in him and claimed him as one of their boys, because it was here that he first began to achieve greatness."

Eddie reports: "My bearing on that occasion must have given the town an exaggerated idea of my courage, for I was presently offered an opportunity to enlist as a hired gunman."

From Stanley Vestal's book, Queen of Cowtowns, Dodge City, "The Wickedest Little City in America, 1872-1886.

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Larry Brown
Here's a brain teaser with both sports and movie links:  Vince Lombardi is often credited with this quote:  "Winning isn't everything . . . it's the only thing!"  But it's actually from a movie.  What was the movie, and who said it?

And since I mentioned Lombardi, a bonus question for Packer fans:  When the Pack hired Lombardi, he was not their first choice.  Who turned down the job before they hired Vince?

Bringing this one to the top again.  The movie from which the Lombardi quote came is not particularly well-known, but its star is VERY well known--mostly for a very long Hollywood career (and an Oscar) in Westerns.

Both the movie star in question and the coach who turned down the Packers job before they hired Lombardi have strong connections to the state of Iowa.

Re Eddie Foy, another interesting bit of trivia:  Eddie Foy Jr played his father in several movies, including the Randolph Scott film "Frontier Marshal", about Wyatt Earp.

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Steve Sutton

Go me on the movie Larry but I do know that the quote was not originally Lombardi's....he's credited for it but wasn't the first to use it......

So followup question "who was the first person to use the quote that Lombardi is credited with"?......

Steve.....

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Larry Brown
Steve, I guess the quote originated with the guy who wrote the script for the movie in question.  The actor who played the coach:  Big hint.  His nickname might lead you to believe he was a member of the nobility.
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Steve Sutton

Had to be Ronald Reagan.  And if it wasn't the shame on em.  

Steve

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