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A Broken Breed


PartridgeCartridge

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PartridgeCartridge

This post is not meant to start an argument but to relay some disturbing info about an incident that just happened to a person very close to me.

He recently adopted a young pit bull from a shelter. I counseled him about the downside to the breed, the current dog bite statistics and my opinion that somewhere in the past, this particular breed had a broken gene that often manifests itself in unspeakable carnage. He disregarded my input and moved forward with the adoption.

I really wanted to like this dog. He seemed to have perfect confirmation and a very playful and gentle demeanor. He loved getting his belly scratched. By all appearances, he was gentle and biddable.

I really wanted to like this dog.

I did notice from the very beginning that this dog would lay in the corner on his dog bed and leer intently at my buddy.

The pup also growled at anyone approaching his food bowl. Except me. He was docile and friendly as a puppy with me.

I really wanted to like this dog.

Two nights ago, my buddy was watching TV and called the pup up next to him for a belly scratching like he had done a hundred times before.

The pup jumped up on the couch and clamped his jaws around my friend's face and began to violently shake his head. The resulting facial wound will require plastic surgery to close and fix. His septum was punctured as well.

There was blood on the walls of the living room. It was a vicious attack.

We are still in a state of bewilderment about the whole thing.

Personally I do believe that there is a broken chromosome or a defective gene in SBT's/AST's (Pit Bulls).

I really wanted to like this dog.

I will NEVER trust another Pit Bull.

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Post these comments in most forums and the pit bull owners will:

1. Insist that you blame the owner, not the dog or breed

2. Post pics of thier pit bulls snuggling their kids with tag lines like, "Yeah, real vicious".

Here in MD a law singling out the pit bull as a dangerous breed and holding their owners extra liable for their actions caused a great outcry and was eventually struck down. Legally I guess you're just as liable for your poodle are you are for your pet tiger.

I did my own research and found solid evidence that the overwhelming majority of dog attacks and deaths were caused by pit bulls, reason enough to single them out for special treatment IMHO.

As an aside, leaving DC yesterday I saw what appeared to be a feral pit bull in a woodlot of a highway interchange.  It had no collar and was huge.  I would not want to be confronted by that beast in a city park or side street.

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PC, I am sorry to hear about your friend.   I hope that his wounds heal and that eventually he heals.

Pit bulls have been banned in Ontario since 2005.

As expected there are groups trying to have the law repealed... and as the breed is difficult to "prove" some municipalities are not enforcing the laws as invoked.

Again, I am sorry to read this, share your distrust and hope your friend heals.

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Im not convinced that pit bulls bite more than other breeds (unless solid stats say otherwise), even springers. But Id rather be bitten by a Springer than a pit bull. Just like a springer was originally bred to find, flush and retrieve game birds, a pit bull was originally bred to fight and bite, hold on and shake until shakee was dead. That's a point I have been making ad nauseum for years to pit bull proponents with no acknowledgement.
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Oh, and this Topic has little chance of sticking around for long. Pit Bull Topics never do, and its never up to me.
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RuffChaser
I know someone that had a young child killed by an Old English Sheepdog.
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PartridgeCartridge
I know someone that had a young child killed by an Old English Sheepdog.

Freak things happen.

But the overwhelming evidence supporting Pits as truly dangerous canines can't be understated.

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RuffChaser

The Michael Vick fighting dogs were rehabilitated and many have been placed with families that have other pets and/or small children. Not all can be but that was an extreme. Most of those were dogs were beat and tortured to fight. Some had teeth pulled and were chained to allow them to be bred. A horrible and disgusting situation. They were terrified of people and very aggressive to dogs but most were fixed.

I think that shows they can be perfectly good dogs when in the right hands but unfortunately many aren't in the right hands. I don't know the solution but I also don't know that I'd blame the breed.

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I would never get a pit bull from a shelter. These are the dogs of choice of the dog fighting rings.  You would never know if you're getting a reject or a washout dog.  I don't think pit bulls are inherently any meaner than other breeds but are turned that way by the type of owners they usually have from puppyhood.  From my observation (certainly not scientific) if they are raised in a stable home they aren't any more dangerous than any other big breed. That being said I would never own one as a pet.

As Brad said, if they attack there is no quit. They are willing to die in order to win.  

What a horrific event for your friend. Here's hoping he heals completely.

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Greg Hartman

Dave, I agree with you generally.  My dogs are hard-wired to be bird dogs and to dispatch small varmints. Pit bulls are hard-wired to attack and fight.

We had a fat, lazy cat.  My dogs were taught that they could not attack or maul the cat.  They seemed to love that cat and they slept together often - never had a problem until the cat died of old age. Still, I always kept a close eye out and never trusted the dogs 100% around the cat.

My nearest (not all that near) neighbor unfortunately keeps chickens and turkeys.  My dogs have been taught in no uncertain terms not to mess with those birds - and they don't, other than eying them up.  Nonetheless, I don't trust them and I know some stimulus (unknown to me, but affecting their hard-wired prey drive - a bird flapping in a certain way for example) could set them off and there would follow an awe-inspiring slaughter in seconds.

I don't think pits are any different.  Sure, they can be taught to be safe around other dogs, kids, people, etc, but they are hard-wired differently.  When the wrong stimulus (that means nothing to you) comes along, they will react as they have been bred to do for countless generations.  It will happen before you can blink.  They may likely go through their whole lives without that happening, but there's a chance they may not.  And now you're not talking about a bunch of dead chickens or a gnawed cat, your talking about major injury or death to people because pits are powerful animals.

The problem is greatly exacerbated by all the punks who have pits in the city and teach them to be vicious to intimidate all the honest people as they walk them on the sidewalk.  It works on me - I don't like it, but I get the hell out of the way.

I will say hello and be nice to any seemingly friendly pit I meet because they are usually in regular dog mode and I really like dogs, but I don't trust fully them around me or mine (especially including my dog).

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Just too many stories that have the following plot line.

1.  Bring home a pit.

2.  Dog was awesome.

3.  Dog snapped and somebody got hurt bad or died.  

Details change but the plot stays the same.  Too many bad things happen around those dogs.

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Steve Sutton

One day this will end badly.....maybe not this Lion or this person but ONE DAY it will...and has....

one%20day_zps14lab4nz.jpg

I'd agree that if a PitBull puppy is raised as a dog and not a killer then the chances are more remote that it will happen but when you breed something into an animal its always there....and the potential for it to surface is much higher than in breeds where it was not bred into their genetic code...

MO its even worse with "re-hab's"....reference the "Michael Vic's dogs were rehab'ed" post.....humans with alcohol and drug problems are re-hab'ed successfully and everyone that I've ever known has told me they still have that underlying problem...and that they are almost always on the verge of a relapse...and that there is no telling what the event will be that causes that relapse.....I'd say the same applies to Vic's, and any other rehab'ed dog....like Brad said their an "unknown cause" away from a relapse that will result in serious damage to the attackee......

Steve

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Just too many stories that have the following plot line.

1.  Bring home a pit.

2.  Dog was awesome.

3.  Dog snapped and somebody got hurt bad or died.  

Details change but the plot stays the same.  Too many bad things happen around those dogs.

Yup, seems like a broken record.

I have no need for a cattle dog (don't have any cattle), don't need a catch dog (no feral hogs in the Cowboy State), and I don't fight dogs. So i'll never own a pit....ever.

I would never suggest anyone ever own one either.

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One day this will end badly.....maybe not this Lion or this person but ONE DAY it will...and has....

one%20day_zps14lab4nz.jpg

Looks like that cat is sizing up his next meal!

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Besides the concern of what pit bulls were originally bred for, a valid concern.

I think there is the additional concern, what type of breeding to enhance aggression, bite strength etc.. And all the other traits A certain element wants in Pits, Has been accomplished in a particular  rescued pit bulls immediate parents etc..

Those hard wired traits could be off the chart in any given rescued Pit.

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