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Dakota Dogman

What are your Prized Possessions

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Dakota Dogman

I am working on a theory for my kids & so wanted to get some outside input...

The basic question is What is your prized possession(s) (doesn't have to be only the #1)?  I'll make it easier too; nothing alive.  No need to tell me it is your wife, kids, husband, dog, etc.  I am taking it for granted that we would all value the living more than the things made of wood, metal & stone.

And if you don't mind... the more interesting part for me always is WHY.  Why is this your treasure?

So for instance I have a pair of S&W revolvers.  Both were bought for me by my wife at times when wisdom & circumstances would have suggested wait.  There are 3 knives that were given to me by friends... 2 are custom knives created by nationally known masters & 1 is a simple Buck 3 blade... they are special because of who gave them to me.  

How about you?  What are your treasures & why?

God bless,

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Rex Hoppie

At this stage of my life my cherished possessions are my memories.  There is no question.

In the realm of things one of my prize possessions is my Winchester 21 16 gauge skeet gun.  Purchased years ago with my Mom's modest inheritance.  The house needed a new roof and I suggested to my wife that my inheritance would cover the cost.  My precious wife told me in no uncertain terms I was not spending my Mom's inheritance on shingles.  So you could say two most influential people in my life conspired for me to own my Winchester.

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Laminarman
A little blue Boy Scouts jack knife.  Given to me by my father as I lay in bed dreaming of getting one for my first camping trip.  Him handing it to me and telling me I was a man and to be careful.  A 20g Ithaca 37 for my 16th birthday from my parents.  A Ruger 10/22 for my 14th birthday from my parents.  A Saracione fly reel from my parents for my 50th birthday last year.    My parents don't hunt or fish and never cared for it so maybe that's why the love is evident.  Any card or item my kids made for me, of course.

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trust me

Pap's Auto 5.  His Ambassadeur 5000.  My Daiwa Prolite baitcasters.  A WWII ammo bag. An old Nikon camera that got retired when digital happened. Various knives.  A shoebox of trinkets and mementos from childhood that I don't show anybody because they laugh at me but there are small rocks and small toys in there that can bring tears to my eyes when i get them out. A shelf of books that money can't buy. An old aluminum canoe loaded with dents and long miles and more happy memories than I'll ever deserve.

Sentimentality is my curse.

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bobman
photos and films of my kids when they were little, and my first dogs collar.....all my other possessions are just crap i could replace

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DennisMcFeely

I've collected watches since my teen years, probably for these reasons;

My most treasured physical possession is my father's gold Omega wristwatch which was his father's.  He gave it to me the week before he died.  I only wear it on special family occasions and it is put away and well protected otherwise.

This is closely followed by my maternal father's pocketwatch which she had inscribed and gave to me on my 30th birthday.  Gramp took a class as a young man and as a hobby liked to repair and tinker with mechanical watches.

I have a number of modern and vintage watches worth much more monetarily but these two are by far the most valuable to me as representing the two men I loved and respected most.

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Ben Hong

At this stage of my life my cherished possessions are my memories.  There is no question.

Another Hoppie-ism, a keeper.

Materially, I have nothing that cannot be replaced, but things that are given and received with love are to be cherished. My (2) things are the heritage Klipsch Cornwall II speakers given to me by my wife on my birthday,  about 30 years ago. The very few who are true audiophiles will recognize them.

Cornwall II

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Laminarman
At this stage of my life my cherished possessions are my memories.  There is no question.

Another Hoppie-ism, a keeper.

Materially, I have nothing that cannot be replaced, but things that are given and received with love are to be cherished. My (2) things are the heritage Klipsch Cornwall II speakers given to me by my wife on my birthday,  about 30 years ago. The very few who are true audiophiles will recognize them.

Cornwall II

Oh yes I would.  Nice speakers! :)

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mshowman

A couple of my most prized possessions have already been handed on to my kids so I guess they don't really count as being mine. One was my mom's engagement ring that I gave my daughter. The other was my dad's 16 gauge Remington Sportsman (many of you have heard the story about it) that I gave my son.

Of the things I have remaining there are several that I would, or will give to the right person at the right time, but that time hasn't come yet. They include the sheath knife that my dad made during his WWII visit to New Caledonia, the tanned elk hides that he planned to do something with someday, the tiny coin game that my grandfather gave me after one of his sons (he couldn't remember which) gave him upon their return from WWII (it has Made In Occupied Japan stamped on the back), my dad's old Herters sleeping bag, the hand carved walnut parlor corner chair that was passed from my dad's aunt, to my grandmother, to my mom and then to me.... OK, I'll admit it. I'm a packrat and I have a problem.

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GraceinVA
Mine would be my Bible.

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Cooter Brown
Pap's Auto 5.  His Ambassadeur 5000.  My Daiwa Prolite baitcasters.  A WWII ammo bag. An old Nikon camera that got retired when digital happened. Various knives.  A shoebox of trinkets and mementos from childhood that I don't show anybody because they laugh at me but there are small rocks and small toys in there that can bring tears to my eyes when i get them out. A shelf of books that money can't buy. An old aluminum canoe loaded with dents and long miles and more happy memories than I'll ever deserve.

Sentimentality is my curse.

Substitute a few things I have from Dad and Mom and grandparents and that's me exactly, the toys, rocks, odd bits of string included.

One of the toughest things I've ever had to do is the last few months of going through the folks' house and deciding what to do with everything.

Right now I'm working on a shadowbox for Dad's decorations from WWII.

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Samuel Hoggson

Material things lag way behind really important stuff.  

Playing by the rules redirects my answer:  our domicile, aka, El Rancho Hoggson.  

About every good childhood memory I possess is sited at my parent's farm in Guilford.  When I landed the job in Bangor I figured that was as close as I would get to the ideal.  Then we drove by this place with for sale sign, en route to my parent's house for dinner.  And that was it.  

My colleagues maintain I was insane to deal with the commute, needing to stay in Bangor when on call.  Some winters I kinda agreed.  But without this place my kids could not have had such spectacular childhoods, the Norman Rockwell painting type, ones that mostly no longer exist.    

Living in Maine cost me a small fortune in potential income.  But not one of those lost pennys do I regret.

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Brad Eden

I suppose this would be what I would run back into a burning house for.

My first reaction is my firearm collection, but upon reflection that would be more for the monetary value than sentimental value. Then my computer, but that would be to save my work and writing and art files. Then my framed paintings and rendering Ive done, but that would be for egotistical reasons.

Which brings my deer mounts to mind. Particularly my two half sneak buck head mounts of my two biggest deer. Both well over 200 lbs field dressed. Why? Because I worked long and hard to get myself the opportunity to take them in a state that is a hard ass state to deer hunt in.

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barna

Mine would be a plainer work bench that my dad made, it’s a work bench especially designed  for wood working, he made two when he was still working.  One was at his shop at home and the other was at his work before he retired.  I snagged one before anyone else had a chance.  It’s made of hard maple,  got two built in vices to hold just about any piece of wood the needs to be worked on.   A square head wood working hammer he had made by a machinist.  He hated the American style round head hammers because they reminded him of the shoe maker’s hammer from the old country and because it was insulting to use a shoe maker’s tool as a master wood worker.   A knife that my uncle made, its polished steel, with stag antler in the handle. Also has a bottle opener built in at the base of the blade.   A Kassai composite bow (Hungarian horse bow),  birthday gift from my father.   A couple of cast iron skillets my mother in law gave me before she passed.

Barna

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fishmunkee
The fire fighter's helmet my grandfather wore while on the Buffalo FD in the 30's. I also have his FD ID card and the buttons from his dress uniform that I need to get into a shadow box display.

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