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Dakota Dogman

What are your Prized Possessions

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Brad Adrian
Mine would be pretty sparse. My dads A5 light 12, and a cheap Spanish 20 sxs that was my first gun in 1978. They come in last My most important ones would be a shadow box that a friend made for me that commemorates my 20 years in the Navy, and a letter from Ronald Reagan congratulating on my retirement from the Navy in 2004.

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Treerooster

I got two things.

My log cabin in Wis. It is a wonderful place to base my hunting from. The cabin was built 100 yards from where I shot my first ruffed grouse back in 1972. For 8 weeks (or so) out of the year it is my slice of heaven. The cabin only has about 10 years of history, the place more than 40. The log cabin is just very nice ambiance.

The other would be my bands. I have 13 mallard, 2 B W teal, 2 geese, 1 woodcock, 3 turkey, and 3 bald eagle bands. I "earned" them all. The eagle bands were earned through my volunteer work banding almost 200 bald eagle chicks. I am a band nut and the history each has makes each one irreplaceable.

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Uplander

I have three things that qualify:

1.  When I was 9 or 10 years old, Dear Ol' Dad gave me this Case pocketknife:

IMG_1529_zps3ba6f251.jpg

He picked it up at a Newberry's or Woolworth's for small money, probably expecting me to lose it relatively quickly.

Instead, it has been in my left front pocket nearly every single day of my life since.  For almost 35 years now it has gutted innumerable brook trout, cleaned numerable pa'tridge, sliced baguettes and cheeses at impromptu picnics, opened my mail, etc.

2.  The summer before I left for college, my Mother wrote me a poem.  It has been folded up and safeguarded away for over 20 years now; taken out and read when I need a boost.

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3.  Lisa started knitting around a decade ago.  One of the first things she knit for me is this pair of socks.  I want them to last a lifetime, so I only wear them once a winter or so.

24f3a54a6aaa17d7b5f5464e874b6e60_zps2rgy

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PartridgeCartridge
I have three things that qualify:

1.  When I was 9 or 10 years old, Dear Ol' Dad gave me this Case pocketknife:

IMG_1529_zps3ba6f251.jpg

He picked it up at a Newberry's or Woolworth's for small money, probably expecting me to lose it relatively quickly.

Instead, it has been in my left front pocket nearly every single day of my life since.  For almost 35 years now it has gutted innumerable brook trout, cleaned numerable pa'tridge, sliced baguettes and cheeses at impromptu picnics, opened my mail, etc.

2.  The summer before I left for college, my Mother wrote me a poem.  It has been folded up and safeguarded away for over 20 years now; taken out and read when I need a boost.

a894511f8900e46e054485343b805136_zps5uau

3.  Lisa started knitting around a decade ago.  One of the first things she knit for me is this pair of socks.  I want them to last a lifetime, so I only wear them once a winter or so.

24f3a54a6aaa17d7b5f5464e874b6e60_zps2rgy

Dork.

Just kidding.

Those kinds of things are priceless.

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OldSarge

I've been blessed with some nice stuff over the years. Some good guns inherited from family members, nice knives, beautiful home and property, and some nice vehicles. I'm a lucky man.

But the one "thing" I cherish is my Master Parachutist Badge. I had to earn those wings and was always proud to perform Jumpmaster duties.

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DaveWE

Thanks for posting this question!

Made me think of how many treasures I hold dear to my heart....too numerous to fully list.  I think life would be flat and without meaning if you didn't hold something dear as a momento of good times past.  

Even something as silly as plastic green army men I played with as a child or something as huge as my grandmother's bible that I carried for her.  Or dad's model 12, or even the old Plymouth that was my first car ride bringing me home from the hospital at birth.  The great thing is it can be anything we choose, cheap or ultra expensive...they bring smiles, grins and fond memories every time they are touched.  Enjoy your treasures for they are yours and yours alone.

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Wisconsin

Hands down a 9mm Luger my father took from a German officer he captured in Italy during WWll.

Ken

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Greg Hartman

An interesting question...  Had to really think about it.  

I guess I actually have a ton of "stuff" that is important to me - all for reasons of nostalgia and memory, not intrinsic value - such as the child-size work bench my nearly blind PA Dutch grandfather built for me when was six years old as part of teaching me to use tools and to be a man.  I am now working with my youngest grandson on that same workbench to build a house for his dog to begin to teach him to use tools and other "manly" skills that seem too rare today.  I will give him this very well worn work bench (made by his great-great grandfather!) when he is done with the dog house.

I guess that if my house was on fire (God forbid!) and I had only a few minutes to grab stuff (of course, "possessions" like my dogs would be at the top of the list, but this isn't about that), I would probably grab my primary hunting shotguns and rifles; and my photos, both digital and tangible.  The reason for grabbing the photos is obvious.  Some of those guns have substantial intrinsic value, but that's not why I would grab them.  They embody memories of the best days of my life.

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Dick Sellers
Pretty easy question for me.  I'd take the file cabinet full of thousands of slides of many adventures from my years in Alaska with family and friends.

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Pumpgun

Item that has been passed down to me:

a battered pair of dog tags worn by my mother's brother, T/Sgt. James Hulings, as he jumped to his death from his burning B-17 on 01/20/1945, on his 28th bombing mission.

Item that I have bought:

1978 Ruger M77 in 7mmRM.  Lots of happy memories of a 21 yr. old kid with his first "real" rifle.

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Iver

This is a tough question to answer.  I am pretty much a small scale horder.

I have so many of my firsts... first motorcycle, first car, first gun, first wife.   All of these have significant value to me.

I also have the small box of silly things that I kept from when I was young.

Unfortunately I have a handful of things from people that I cherished that have passed.

Can't say what I would grab in the fire but I can say that I would be crushed by the things that I could not save.

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Brad Eden
I might grab the custom urns that hold past dogs ashes before the deer heads....come to think of it.

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RuffChaser

I save things but haven't had a lot of things given to me. I do have the following:

A stick that Haze pulled from the water during a trip to the North Shore with Peggy. It's a perfect walking stick. He found it stuck to a rock under the water and pulled it out and carried it to shore and gave it to me. The year before he pawed a rock to shore along the beach as we sat and admired the Split Rock Lighthouse. These two occasions are the only time he has ever done anything like this. He's some kind of special dog. Both of those sit in our library.

I am a huge Reds fan, so was my Mom. When they opened the new stadium I bought a brick and had it inscribed for her. A year after the stadium opened I took my parents to a game in Cincy and we went and found her brick. I got a duplicate of it. My Mom died a little over a year ago. My parents house is up for sale but my siblings found the brick and are bringing it to me. I'll get it a few days before Peggy and I get married on the North Shore. I don't have it yet but it will be very special when I get it. Another item in route is a really old arc welder my dad used to have. It had numbered holes and two different ground holes (A/B) for the cables. The higher the number and switching from A-B increased the current. It must be close to 100 years old. I am amazed I didn't kill myself with that thing when I was a kid. It doesn't work anymore but it doesn't need to,. It reminds me of my Dad. These were the two things I asked for from my parents home. There are 9 siblings so we all had some favorites.

I have a wooden cane that a few of my siblings and I made for our Grandmother. She passed away a few years ago and I got it back.

I have a few things I'd like to pass on as I get older. I don't know if they are prized but I'd like to think they are special and I hope the person that receives them will consider them a prized possession.

Tye

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Rockdoc

My most prized possession and the one I work hard to keep intact is my robust health. As for my physical possessions, that’s just so much “stuff”.

Steve

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popplecop
Have firearms from my Great Grandfather, Grandfather and my Father, but I'm with  Rex too.  In my twilight years the memories are the most precious to me.

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