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Dakota Dogman

What are your Prized Possessions

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MAArcher
I have stuff I like.  Trinkets and guns.  I'm a pack rat and have a lot of odds and ends that remind me of various things.  But really, there isn't anything I'd run back into a burning building to save or loose a tone of sleep over.

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Tim Frazier

As much as I'd like to delve into this, and I think it's really a cool subject, I'm having trouble.

I remember in 2011 almost being home with my wife and three kids from an 8000 mile vacation out west.  It was a great time, and we were all together.  I remember wondering if everything was OK that we had left, house, cars, dogs and such.

I realized that outside of the dogs, it just didn't matter, I honestly didn't care.  Everything I would ever care about was in that Expedition and we were fine.

My dad passed this spring, he was an amazing man in many ways and with nothing more than a teachers salary had amassed a small fortune to include a great farm, nice equipment, nice house.  He took none of it with him.

I have been blessed with the best friends and family a man could ask for, I have never been rich in money,cars, guns, but damn I've lived a charmed life.

My answer is nothing other than my family, my friends and my memories of the last 50 years.  

Sorry to be such a downer on such a great thread!

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Ben Hong
Sorry to be such a downer on such a great thread!

Not at all, Tim. You are one of the lucky few who have a good set of priorities to work with.

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ANF grousin

This

I have stuff I like.  Trinkets and guns.  I'm a pack rat and have a lot of odds and ends that remind me of various things.  But really, there isn't anything I'd run back into a burning building to save or loose a tone of sleep over.

And this

My answer is nothing other than my family, my friends and my memories of the last 50 years.

I really should take more pictures so people in the future can understand the memories I've been enjoying in my life time.

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trust me

I am having trouble conveying to my children how special certain places and things are to me. I want them to find those things just as special, but they don't, and I understand that.  They're individuals, not just like me thank goodness, and our priorities are different.

I was the kid that could find a patch of ladyslippers or fill his pockets with unique rocks and consider himself very rich.

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Cooter Brown

I am having trouble conveying to my children how special certain places and things are to me. I want them to find those things just as special, but they don't, and I understand that.  They're individuals, not just like me thank goodness, and our priorities are different.

I was the kid that could find a patch of ladyslippers or fill his pockets with unique rocks and consider himself very rich.

We're a lot alike, Marty.

One of my sisters is similar, the other seems to lack any sentimentality about things which I don't understand at all.

Certain things, a book, say, or a pair of my Dad's pliers, which came from his Dad, the candlesticks my grandparents bought when they went to the Smoky Mountains in the 20s--these things are touchstones, tangible connections to people that are gone and contain memories that can be passed on to young folks in the family.

I've lost through carelessness, burglary and plain stupidity things that can't be replaced.

The feelings these things can bring to me are so deep and so much a part of how I'm made that I just can't identify with someone who doesn't value these objects from the past.  It's mystifying.

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oldbird
My Mom passed away this spring at 98 years of age. She had very little in the way of material possesions, she just didn't care about "stuff" so she gave it away. Due to her alzheimers she didn't even have the memories. That caused her the most stress.

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MAArcher

The "special places" thing I understand.  Over the past few years I've had to fight back tears as more and more of the woods I love get obliterated for McMantions.  

I'm not very religious, but I wonder what will happen to us when we're out of room, we've cut the last tree and all of creation is covered up in pavement and plastic?

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browndrake

Taking 'live things' out of the equation,  My wedding band would be at the top of the list.  There have been times of trial and hardship when just touching it would take me back to the wedding alter, so many years ago and give me hope and strength.

Dad's old Winchester model 94 30-30 and his old table saw and jointer would be next.

When a teenager, dad worked at the grocery store.  He was paid in groceries for the family.  They had the 30-30 on the wall.  He told them to apply any leftover money towards it.  One day the boss took it down and handed to him.

The tools were grandpa's.  Dad was about sixth generation craftsman.  Those tools were dad's inheritance.  Grandpa died young, age 41.  Those tools also are my inheritance, as are the skills that I was taught growing up with them.

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Tiger MT's Carter
As far as material things it would be two Brent Todd prints (Prime Time and Slippin’ Away) and a painting of my dog “Jack” done by Bob Bertram.

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tut
Outside of family and pets (which truly are family), I can say the only thing I'd grab and run with if I had to would be the AbbyGun and a handful of pictures.  Anything else is much further down the tier.

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Gunflint Charlie

One is a Rem. M-10 that was my grandfather's before it was my dad's, and this 1918 Minnesota hunting license I found under the buttplate soon after my dad gave me the gun -- signed and dated four days before he was born. Another is my 16 ga. M-21 -- my Abby gun. There's not much else that's very special, except family photos from great-grandparents down to the present.

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Brad Eden

I keep changing my mind...

I made a habit of saving all my kids drawings and notes and hand made cards. I slipped them in random books in my library. Right now I can lean back and pick out any random book and there will likely be some remembrance from the past. So all those mementos from the kids is my choice today.

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MAArcher

If Brad can change his mind, I change mine too.  

I have a wrist watch that was given to my Grandfather by my Grandmother in 1942.  When I got it, it was in pretty bad shape.  The reason it was given to me was because shortly after my Grandfather passed, I was chit chatting with my Grandmother and told her how I once had a pocket watch that my father had given to me, but it was ruined because I fell off the jetty and into the Merrimack river while fishing for striper and the salt water destroyed it.  She said what a coincidence, I have a watch I gave to your Grandfather and not long after I gave it to him he ruined it the exact same way, exact same spot, over 50 years ago!  

She gave me the watch and I was able to buy the same vintage, make and model off eBay that was given by the US Postal service to a guy in 1942 for his years of service, and use it for parts to rebuild my Grandfathers watch (it's really the engraving on the back plate that was precious and that was salvaged).  

I have a gold pocket watch of his also, but I like the saga of the inexpensive Waltham wrist watch.  I'd go back into the burning building for that watch if things weren't too hot.  You never know, maybe I'll have grand kid that takes an unexpected dunk in the Merrimack one day and he'll need Grandpa's watch to replace the one he ruins.

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John

I have a micrometer set that was my grandfathers. He used them while doing his work on hoverdame and the atom bomb-in Tennese.

I also have his bible

I have a picture of my father when he won soap box derby.  

I have my grandmothers fathers pocket watch from when he was conductor on the rail road

Things like that. With both parents gone, I have my memories, those I carry with me all the time.

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