Jump to content
REGISTERING FOR MEMBERSHIP ON UPLAND JOURNAL Read more... ×
Sign in to follow this  
Dakota Dogman

What are your Prized Possessions

Recommended Posts

Greg Hartman
I've been somewhat reluctant to post this. As you age some things take on a great deal more worth. I've told my wife should the house ever catch fire forget my guns and other so called treasures I've acquired over the years; grab my Combat Medic Badge.

I consider it to be my most valuable possession. It';s not very big though it is sterling silver. I wear it but twice a year, Memorial Day and Veterans Day to honor those men from my old combat company, "B" Co. 1st Batl., 3rd Bgd, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. RVN, 68/69.

"Garry Owen"

Easy to understand you choosing this John. Now I understand your avatar. I'm glad you posted it.

Jay

Yes.  Agreed!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Field Grade

I used to have a nice liver that I really cherished, but attending UJ events destroyed it.

I do have some of my grandparents' cast iron frying pans, made by Griswold in my hometown of Erie, Pa. Probably 100 years old or so and still as sound as the day they were forged.

My dad gave me an old fireplace bellows that's been in the family for generations, still use it to rekindle the coals in the winter.

My dad has a nice shadowbox of his ribbons, medals and insignia from WWII. Someday I hope to inherit that -- but thankfully he is still with us and hope he stays hale and healthy for years to come.

-Rob J.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mike Connally

Family, house, memories....I think we all get that. Priceless.

But stuff?

My Dad's Marbles Woodsman knife.

His Iver Johnson single shot 12 gauge.

His WWII medals.

And Joy. 11 years old and can't hunt anymore. Breaks my heart.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PaFlyfisher
I have many favorite "things", most of which are due to the circumstances in which I acquired them, or the individual and their memory associated with them.

But most treasured, it's a tie between scads of photos (digital and hard copy) and two small cigar boxes.  Please, allow me to explain.

Several years ago, a friend of mine passed.  At his funeral were photos taken of he and I by my wife, really the only photos of him taken for years.  I used to think all her picture taking was silly.  I understand now, the wisdom she had in capturing a moment in time forever, a memory that burns, and though the moment is a vapor, that small portion of a second is captured in time.  It brings smiles through heartache and tears, it renews laughter in times of sorrow, and it warms the heart and mind in times of need.  It permits sweet memories and triggers the other senses.  Who can't look at a dog, soaked with rain in the front of a pickup truck and instantly know that odor?  Or hear the boom of a friends voice in a photo caught of them belting their version of an operetta?  Perhaps more importantly, it is the easiest and simplest way to turn back time and remember a moment in vivid detail.

The other two cigar boxes are even more precious.  When my girls were born, I bought a box of cigars, the last I ever smoked (and I was not much of a cigar smoker before hand).  Each daughter has her own box, inside those boxes are items many would toss.  The shotgun shell and feather of a turkey I never brought home and my oldest daughter asked where the turkey was.  The bottlecap to a bottle of cherry cream soda, the first I ever shared with my youngest daughter in front of an office store on our first daddy-daughter date.  Rings made from silverware/napkin binders, a band from the cigar I smoked in their honor when they were safe and sound home from the hospital, a sweet note meant just for daddy, a rodeo ticket with my oldest because her baby sister was too young to go with us, a movie stub from the first movie they ever sat through, a homemade necklace, the first dandelion gifted to me, a leaf brought home because it was pretty, the list goes on.  There are even a few things I don't remember already, but I don't mind even that.  I can tell you this, each and every item in that box is a memory that made me smile, made me glow in pride and love as I placed it in the that box, and I know if there is something in each girls box, it represents a specific memory between her and I.

These boxes will someday be wedding gifts, given in love, with tears in my eyes as I hug my little girl.  And I will explain to her that each and every item in that box is a shared memory, each and every item was a precious gift to her daddy, and no matter where she goes, the memories packed in that little box exceeds any monetary value any person could ever place before me.  When they look at those boxes, I want them to hear the words they have heard from me from the time they were tiny, something I try to tell them at least every day, sometimes more, "Don't you ever forget how much Mommy, Daddy, and Jesus love you."

Winner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RuffChaser
Field Grade. I also am originally from Erie, PA. I almost forgot that my sister found some of my Mom's Griswold pans when clearing out my parents house. I am also getting them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×