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Greg Hartman

Single Malt For Dummies

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Dogwood

Generally I don't think the greater single malt age warrants the price premium.  If I like a given brand I won't pay extra for it.  Personally once a bottle surpasses about $75 I lose interest.  I can afford it but the few I've tried didn't seem any better.  Not that I would mind trying a sip of blended Johnny Walker Blue with the personalized engraved bottle at say 300 bucks a pop.

Peruse You Tube for Scotch reviews; some are quite good and informative.  Others quite stuffy and ridiculous with all the so-called tasting notes etc.  Really, you can taste and smell 10 different things in there bub?  Sure you can.

And for the love of God when will PA dump the antiquated state liquor stores !!!??  PIA.  Ranks right up there with annual state auto inspections.

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KerryLuft

I went through a Scotch phase, largely prompted by a trip to Scotland. Tried a lot, settled on Talisker and Oban, with an occasional side trip to Macallans and Lagavulin.

Over the years I've gravitated back to bourbon.  For my taste, a glass of Blanton's over a couple ice cubes is better than anything I've had from Scotland.

However, Greg ... I still keep a couple bottles of single malt. In no particular order, for someone acquiring a taste, I might try:

Balvenie 12-year-old Doublewood

The Macallan 12-year-old

Talisker

All about $50.

If you want a step up, try Macallan's 15 year old for about twice the price -- but IMO, not twice the money.  Macallan's also has a terrific bottling called the "Elegancia" but I can only find it in duty free shops.

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Cooter Brown
Over the years I've gravitated back to bourbon.  For my taste, a glass of Blanton's over a couple ice cubes is better than anything I've had from Scotland.

Bingo.  And you can spend far less money and get far more variety.

Unfortunately the Scotch weenie "I can taste ten notes in this" crowd has infiltrated the Bourbon thing.

It doesn't change the whiskey but it raises prices and it's just plain annoying.

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Laminarman

Since I became more intrigued by Scotch I've largely given up bourbon.  The cloying sweetness gets to me.  Build a fire, let the wood get charred, douse it out, then chew on a burnt stick....or have a dram of Lagavulin, about the same thing.  Love it.  

Want a treat?  My favorite about now is 18 year Highland.  Pricey but a bottle lasts a long time since you don't gulp it.  The 12 year old Highland is nice too.

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Flairball

As has been said. The Balvenie 12yr old Doublewood is nice. Their 14yr old Carribean Cask is nice, too. You might want to try some Highland Park, either the 12yr, or the 18yr. You might find you'll suffer a bit of sticker shock when you look at the 18yr, but it's worth it.

When you decide to try a peaty malt I'd recommend staying away from Bowmore, and Laphroig. Nothing wrong with them, but not really a benchmark peat flavor. I'd recommend Lagavulin, or Ardbeg. The Ardbeg Corryvreckan is unbelievable.

I haven't found it true that the older, and more expensive scotch to be tastier. I've tried a few. The Balvenie 21yr isn't worth the money, nor is the Highland Park 30yr. Both were good, but boring. Conversely, I've gone well out of my way to get a bottle of Aberlour 15yr because it's much better than the readily available 16yr. Of course I have been known to spend a few bucks on scotch, and I'm about to drop $300 on a bottle of Ardbeg Alligator I found. In my opinion this Ardbeg limited release was the best malt I've ever tasted. I nearly cried when I finished my last dram.

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Urgarteburu
Glenmorangie is still one of the easiest drinking scotch's. I will add a vote for 12 yr highland park. I have a bottle of arbeg 10 in the cupboard that has been there a long time. If you like eating smoked peat you will love it. For me it is only on occasion. Another good blend is Johnny walker black, said to be Churchill's daily dram. If you like Glenmorangie you will also like The Glenlivet 15 yr french oak reserve

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vabirddog
I am a PA Dutch phez/meat hunter

pheasantplucker3_zpsfbc5e009.jpg

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Greg Hartman
I am a PA Dutch phez/meat hunter

pheasantplucker3_zpsfbc5e009.jpg

There it is!

It's kinda hard to make out from the photo - and I want to make sure I've got the right stuff.  Is that word in the name after Pheasant" spelled "Plucker"  of "Phucker"?

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Flairball
I am a PA Dutch phez/meat hunter

pheasantplucker3_zpsfbc5e009.jpg

There it is!

It's kinda hard to make out from the photo - and I want to make sure I've got the right stuff.  Is that word in the name after Pheasant" spelled "Plucker"  of "Phucker"?

They make two different versions.

The "Plucker" is for you're average Pa pheasant Hunter.

The "Phucker" is only for those pheasant Hunter's from Pennsyltuckey.

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FlyChamps

I'm also a lover of highly peated malts - but most people aren't.

Luckily, here in SC, we have somewhat free enterprise liquor stores (no more than three owned by one person or corporation) and the larger stores have great selection and the lowest prices I've seen anywhere in the US.  The liquor store where I shop probably has 25 - 30 different blends and 40 - 50 different single malts.

All Glenmorangie varieties are pleasant sipping Scotches.  My favorite non-peated Scotch is SCAPA from Scapa Flow in the Orkney Islands off the north coast of Scotland - but at $80/750ml here in SC it's a "birthday/Christmas" sip for me - happily my step-son gives me a bottle for Christmas each year.

My favorite peated Scotch is a toss up between Lagavulin and Laphroaig.  My guess is that there is a 1/2% to 1% chance that you'll like either of these.  Lagavulin has "overtones" of iodine and Laphroaig tastes about like eating a block of peat.  For those of us who like peated malt Scotches they are our hope of what will be in heaven.

I'm another who doesn't like Bourbon because it's just too sweet.

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Rogue Hunter

I had been drinking the Macallans 12 yr, but The Balvenie 12 yr Double Wood is my go to now. I'd like to find one on the peaty side, so maybe, Laphroaig or Ardbag 10.

thanks guys,

RH

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KerryLuft
I'd like to find one on the peaty side, so maybe, Laphroaig or Ardbag 10.

Give Talisker a try.  Not quite as peaty as the Islay malts.

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Flairball
I'm also a lover of highly peated malts - but most people aren't.

My favorite peated Scotch is a toss up between Lagavulin and Laphroaig.  

I'm another who doesn't like Bourbon because it's just too sweet.

Try the Ardbeg Corryvreckan. You won't regret it.

Agree about Bourbon being too sweet. In a cocktail; no problem, but....if there was one to drink neat, it'd be the Four Roses Single Barrel. Very rustic.

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Dogwood
I'm also a lover of highly peated malts - but most people aren't.

My favorite peated Scotch is a toss up between Lagavulin and Laphroaig.  

I'm another who doesn't like Bourbon because it's just too sweet.

Try the Ardbeg Corryvreckan. You won't regret it.

Agree about Bourbon being too sweet. In a cocktail; no problem, but....if there was one to drink neat, it'd be the Four Roses Single Barrel. Very rustic.

For all those who think all bourbons are too sweet try a good rye.  Some bourbons taste pretty dry to me; Woodford Reserve comes to mind.

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