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Jakeismydog2

The Revnant

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Spin

Opps, I mixed up Bridger and Jedediah Smith. It was Smith that got scalped by the Grizzly. Guess I'm getting old and memory just isn't as sharp as it once was, sorry.

here's a short account of the affair. -

The bear came out of a thicket and mauled Smith violently, throwing him to the ground, smashing his ribs and literally ripping off his scalp. His head was in the bear's mouth and it chewed off his ear, but somehow, perhaps playing dead, Smith survived. The scalp was hanging on to his head by an ear. As he waited for his men to come with help, he found comfort in the 23rd Psalm.

The men found him in such condition and were horrified. Calmly, Smith instructed Clyman to sew the hanging flesh back on. Clyman did the best he could, but thought nothing could be done for the severed ear. Smith insisted that he try.

According to Clyman, "I put my needle sticking it through and through and over and over laying the lacerated parts together as nice as I could with my hands." After a ten-day recuperation while the men explored the Black Hills, Smith was again leading his expedition forward.

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Up North
We seen it today, great bear attack!

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hayslope

I bet fur tappers smelled pretty bad if you had to share a tent or a buffalo hide with one.

Especially if you gutted a horse, crawled inside and slept in it......

....With your unbathed, flatulent squaw wife and your festering, oozing bear mauling wounds, covered in dried blood, sweat, rotting flesh, scabs, possum fat, skunk lard, pus, and a serious case of swamp ass....

Hence......why Grizz thought they might be worth tasting....again......and again!!!  And comparably, they were probably a bit easier to catch!

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ThomGordon

I'm no film critic so take it for whats its worth buuutttt

I found it to be a Damn good show!!!

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mikegillam
My wife and I saw it today.  Good movie, great scenery, seemed to drag on with his 9 lives....After surviving the bear attack, being buried, and infected wounds, he then floated/swam who knows how far down a river and over a waterfalls, then fell over a over a cliff and into a tree.  One tough dude!  But hey, it was a movie!

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T-Bone

Other than the grizzly attack and the initial crawl, not very accurate to the book or the actual events:

1. Revenging a son that was not mentioned in any of the historical accounts or the book. Hugh Glass was mad for being left without a knife, rifle or even a flint & steel by Fitzgerld and Bridger; the only two people left with him.

2. The attack in the movie occurs in something looking like Washington's Hoh Rainforest; not the actual setting of the Great Plains of now South Dakota.

3. Semi-wild, European Wild Boar in a destroyed Great Plains Indian village…Yah, right.

4. Multi-shot, without reloading, single shot, flintlock muzzleloading pistols and rifles. At no time in the movie do any of the characters do a full load/reload flintlock muzzleloader sequence.

5. A whole sequence of post attack events that are out of sequence or never occurred with the revenge scene being pure Hoolywood. In reality, Glass forgave Bridger and was unable extract revenge on Fitzgerld because he had joined the Army. Glass had to settle for merely getting his rifle back. The whole movie revenge scene is total fiction.

I enjoyed the book and heavily recommend it; the author did his research. The movie is a major disappointment on many counts. I fear many will treat it as factual.

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ThomGordon
You want truth look'er up on the net & you'll find Most of Hugh Glass' story if not all was second hand information possibly three or more times removed. It's a movie fellers, movies are a business which needs to sell tickets this is why they always veer from the truth. The movie needs to be entertaining. Realize this before going in to see the movie and you'll enjoy the movie that much more.

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Cooter Brown

Other than the grizzly attack and the initial crawl, not very accurate to the book or the actual events:

1. Revenging a son that was not mentioned in any of the historical accounts or the book. Hugh Glass was mad for being left without a knife, rifle or even a flint & steel by Fitzgerld and Bridger; the only two people left with him.

2. The attack in the movie occurs in something looking like Washington's Hoh Rainforest; not the actual setting of the Great Plains of now South Dakota.

3. Semi-wild, European Wild Boar in a destroyed Great Plains Indian village…Yah, right.

4. Multi-shot, without reloading, single shot, flintlock muzzleloading pistols and rifles. At no time in the movie do any of the characters do a full load/reload flintlock muzzleloader sequence.

5. A whole sequence of post attack events that are out of sequence or never occurred with the revenge scene being pure Hoolywood. In reality, Glass forgave Bridger and was unable extract revenge on Fitzgerld because he had joined the Army. Glass had to settle for merely getting his rifle back. The whole movie revenge scene is total fiction.

I enjoyed the book and heavily recommend it; the author did his research. The movie is a major disappointment on many counts. I fear many will treat it as factual.

I've got to agree with this.  I haven't seen the movie but there's a fair amount of evidence and original source stuff about the events.

And the truth of the events as far as we know it is dramatic enough for any movie.  I haven't seen it and I might enjoy it, but just as good a movie could have been made using the facts as they are known.

But as we've seen time after time Hollywood doesn't trust or even acknowledge that there is such a thing as a truth.  These days they are not alone in that.

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Longrifle

I saw it with the wife the other day and was confused. *Spolier Alerts*

If the Ree Indians were involved, why the mountains and big forests?  They mentioned the Missouri, I've hunted there for 30 years and never seen anything like that. Wasn't the fur trade centered other places?  When the Re came into the French camp, why didn't they see the Chief's daughter? The officer asks Glass why he is "way out on the frontier" and if it was to get away after shooting a grey jacket officer, but the Pawnee who he was living with were historically in the same area they were depicting; he didn't "go" anywhere. Did he find more than one pistol at the French camp? It's looks like he fired twice and surely didn't reload on horseback. Why does the bare chested guy in the initial attack shoot a horse?  How did the Ree catch the guys on the boat? All they had to do was stay in the middle, and I can't believe horses can outrun the river over a distance, especially since that river is fairly straight without big loops to give an advantage. It's wide enough that I can't imagine trying to swim out to attack the high sided boat. If it was so cold, why no visible breath? Why would an Army led expedition care about furs anyway? What kind of short bow (other than a Holywood one) made in 1820 shoots over a hundred yards with the accuracy depicted and the velocity to go through a skull?  In the opening hunt scene, you hear an elk bugle, but it looks like a moose walks out when he shoots.  Why aren't his clothes frozen solid when he comes out of the sweat lodge?  The boy traps one beaver and skins it to help keep him warm, but the pelt is big enough to be a full on coat, so the beaver must have been the the king of all the beavers.

I was very confused, and can't say I liked much about this movie, other than the flintlocks.

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MTRookie76
My wife and I saw this movie last week and we both enjoyed it. I don't go to the movies for history lessons I go to be entertained and this movie did that very well.

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Ben Hong
My wife and I saw this movie last week and we both enjoyed it. I don't go to the movies for history lessons I go to be entertained and this movie did that very well.

Da truth!

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Longrifle
My wife and I saw this movie last week and we both enjoyed it. I don't go to the movies for history lessons I go to be entertained and this movie did that very well.

Da truth!

I dunno, for me it was like Cloud Atlas or Mulholland Drive, where I walk out going WTH?

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Spin
Yep, Sometimes we overthink stuff. I know I do and from time to time it drives my wife crazy.

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Chukarman

Have not seen the film, have seen trailers.

They say "inspired by a true story". And that is about as close as it gets. Many deviations from the story are noted in previous posts. The actual site of the  Hugh Glass attack was on the prairie of what is now South Dakota, and was a LONG way from the huge mountains in the film, and from any major river - closest is the Missouri.

The bear attack on Hugh Glass happened in Summer - late August, actually. He began his return trip up river in November, so the winter scenes would, I expect, appropriate for that part of the story.

I have been to most of the areas associated with the Hugh Glass story. It is very different from what I saw in the trailers on-line. The site of his confrontation with the young Jim Bridger was the fort at the junction of the Bighorn and Yellowstone Rivers. This area would become part of history again 52 years later.

YellowstoneRiverMap.jpg

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Wyo

 Every time you turned around they were going out of their way to get in a stream or river.  

You got that right! Ha Ha! I laughed out loud!

I'm not much a movie person anymore, but if I recall correctly Robert Redford was constantly rolling around in a frigid winter stream for half of the flick "Jeremiah Johnson."

The original Bridger Trail that was cut in the 1850's is just a few miles behind our Lil' Ranchero. I've actually shot Chukar while standing in the wagon ruts

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