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Jakeismydog2

The Revnant

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jeff88
My wife and I saw this movie last week and we both enjoyed it. I don't go to the movies for history lessons I go to be entertained and this movie did that very well.

Da truth!

No way Hollywood makes movies to reflect the truth, the story trumps facts every time.  But since I do like a good yarn whether on a screen or on pages or even from those I know.  But there is one thing that really bugs me:

As shooters am sure many of you cringe like I do when James Bond shoots a guy off a bridge from the back off a speeding motorcycle with a Walther PPK while the bad guys with scopes can't hit a barn.  Then we see 6 shooters delivering 12 shots out of John Wayne's revolver; or no one re-loading a flintlock that always seems ready to fire.  Probably the best firearms/shooting film I've seen is Open Range.  That gun battle at the end seemed realistic.  Really good story to boot.

One of my favorite shooting scenes was from a dying Tom Hanks in Saving Private Ryan where he desperately gets out his pistol firing at an approaching German tank at the exact same time a plane drops a bomb on it -- that was great!

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Chukarman
You want truth look'er up on the net & you'll find Most of Hugh Glass' story if not all was second hand information possibly three or more times removed. It's a movie fellers, movies are a business which needs to sell tickets this is why they always veer from the truth. The movie needs to be entertaining. Realize this before going in to see the movie and you'll enjoy the movie that much more.

I believe that the original published telling of the Hugh Glass story came from George C. Yount, a veteran mountain man who gathered facts from talking at length with two people who had been there. One was, if I remember correctly, Jim Bridger.

The town of Yountville, California was named for George Yount.

More useless trivia...

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Tim Frazier

For 90% of the people in this country the movies are all the history they will ever get, and that's a shame.  The bear scene was spectacular but the historical liberties were brutal.  One early scene even had snow raked, like a film guy walked where he wasn't supposed to.

From the perspective of 20years of trauma and instructing survival lessons for a Life Flight program and in the military...well...even for a bunch of tough wool wearing SOBs it was hard to swallow for 3 hours.  For what it's worth, there have been trappers found in moose carcass's doing what they depicted in the horse.  ANYONE ever leave a deer out all night?  Yep, those guys died cause they couldn't get out the next morning. (or froze inside a damp carcass)  Rule one STAY DRY

Hand to hand fighting was pretty accurate as most flintlocks were used as clubs in battle like that.  As well the early trappers did carry Pennsylvania Rifles till they found out they did little more than piss off the big bears.

So it was OK.  Glad I paid $5 to see it though.

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Chubs
Glad I paid $5 to see it though.

$5? Where do you live that you're paying 1980s movie ticket pricing to watch a new release?

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Iver
Went last night. Great movie.  They are all tough dudes.

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tut
Glad I paid $5 to see it though.

$5? Where do you live that you're paying 1980s movie ticket pricing to watch a new release?

Drive in Theater perhaps?

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Randy S
Geez, I really like you guys... but you sure are hard on entertainment. I wouldn't worry too much about this movie altering perceived history. If the average movie goer can remember the name Hugh Glass a week after seeing The Revnant I'd be surprised.

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Tim Frazier
Glad I paid $5 to see it though.

$5? Where do you live that you're paying 1980s movie ticket pricing to watch a new release?

We went Sunday after church to a Theater in Garrettsville Ohio that is $7 and $5 for early showings.

It a local gem and they almost lost the business when they had to go digital ($250,000 upgrade)

Went there a lot in High school for $3.00 but don't remember much about the movies that played  :devil:

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tundratom
I loved the movie!  Jeremiah Johnson meets Death Hunt meets The Edge! Pure adventure entertainment!!!  Great acting and superb cinematography! Maybe not historically accurate but it sure entertained me!  I will be buying a copy of that!!

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Virgil Kane

Saw it Friday for $6 senior discount.

Meh. Purely entertainment and glad I didn't spend more than I did for the ticket. I could be wrong but it seemed to me the voice of Dicaprio was dubbed when he was speaking a native language. Great scenery but then over 2 hours of it gets a bit much as does Dicaprio's baby blues.

Virgil

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Guest
My wife and I went last night and we both found it a little slow and the storyline just didn't keep us engaged.

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Slowpokebill

The wife and I saw it the opening weekend on a Sunday afternoon. Price was $5.50 which it is for seniors always.

I guess maybe it comes from living in the Mountain West but we were both disappointed. There was little to much wandering around in the rain forest, an elk bugling in about every scene switch, repeating flintlocks, silly dream sequences that were preachy (I wonder what message they wanted us to take away with the stack of bison skulls) and painfully slow at times. It was like, " I have three or four great action scenes ideas, let's see if we can string them together with some sort of story and make a  movie."

The first battle scene was great. The bear attack was good but if you have spent much time around bears it was hard to watch a guy in a bear suit...the backend of the bear really moved wrong...but I'm getting really picky.

One of the reasons I went to see the movie was because it was shot with only available natural light. That provides some real challenges to the cinematographer I wanted to see how they handled that challenge. I guess you shoot everything in flat light at dawn/dusk and cloudy days. I missed the sun but that is just me.

Overall I give it an okay for what it was but it wasn't an award winning movie for me.

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Pinecobleguy
Watched "Man in the Wilderness"'last night.  It wasn't anywhere near the story line in the book and lots of botched details. All in all a pretty bad movie.

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ThomGordon
You want truth look'er up on the net & you'll find Most of Hugh Glass' story if not all was second hand information possibly three or more times removed. It's a movie fellers, movies are a business which needs to sell tickets this is why they always veer from the truth. The movie needs to be entertaining. Realize this before going in to see the movie and you'll enjoy the movie that much more.

I believe that the original published telling of the Hugh Glass story came from George C. Yount, a veteran mountain man who gathered facts from talking at length with two people who had been there. One was, if I remember correctly, Jim Bridger.

The town of Yountville, California was named for George Yount.

More useless trivia...

I thought Yount's account was second hand? I could be wrong it's been awhile since I read it...

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Spin

For those who claim Hollywood never presents an accurate film depiction of the historical frontier I'd offer Thomas Mann's film "The Last Of The Mohicans" This was accurate down to very small details. Sets were built according to actual builders drawings of the fort represented in the film. Costumes were painstakingly made with historical accuracy as were hair, weapons, and other common artifacts of the time period. No multi shot flintlocks!! Daniel Day Lewis practiced a great deal loading and shooting, even simply carrying and handling period rifles. And he became very interested in them and very proficient. A charcoal burner fan - my kind of guy.

   Ben "Open Range" and "Shane" are my two favorite westerns. I think Open Range was Michael Jeter's last movie. I'm glad it was such a good one and he was great in it.

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