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24 minutes ago, Brad Eden said:

................. Lots of obscure and not so obscure events in the Olympics I guess. I'm gonna rally support for Cornhole. Anyone else in?

 

Not until they change that dreadful name.

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An American lady, Corey Codgell, took bronze in trapshooting in a shoot off.   And swimmer Katie Ledecky absolutely clobbered the competition in the 400 meter freestyle.  She beat second pla

I'm not a big fan of the Olympics since I discovered that many of the athletes are the pampered children of wealthy people who are basically fully supported professional athletes/game players - and th

I wouldn't go to Rio If you paid me and hopefully it doesn't turn into another Munich. I have s bad feeling about these games. We live in dangerous times. Swimming and sailing in sewage laden waters?

Yesterday was the first time I've watched these games with any interest. That interest was to witness the greatness of Usain Bolt. He is the Olympics. There is no purer contest than sprinting. Every person ever born knows more or less how good they are/were at sprinting. Wayde van Niekerk also gave an epic performance by blowing away the field from lane eight and smashing the existing world record. 

 

Many of the sports now in the Olympics are events only a modest percentage of people have ever explored if they had a talent for it. They more obscure sports they add to the Olympics the more they dilute the games greatness to me.  

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WI Outdoor Nut
17 hours ago, Greg Hartman said:

I'm not a big fan of the Olympics since I discovered that many of the athletes are the pampered children of wealthy people who are basically fully supported professional athletes/game players - and that it is virtually impossible for a middle class working person with a family to support to compete at that level.

I will toss in my experience on this:

A buddy of mine has 2 young kids (ages 10 and 12 I think) who are very good skiers.  They dominated their perspective meets for years in the Midwest and last year were encouraged to try out for the US Jr. Ski team.  This is the biggest feeder system for the US Olympic Ski team.  The kids tried out and low and behold, made the team.  That was the easy part per se.  The team is based out of Vail, CO.  He and his family had 30 days to make the decision to head out there or not.  If you are from a wealthy family, often the mother would head out with the kids and live there.  My buddy and his wife, both do well from an income standpoint, but they are your typical, dual income, middle class family. 

 

They made the hard decision to pick up and move.  She was able to keep her job, he had to find a new one.  Their house sold within a few days and decided to rent one out there.  From a financial standpoint, the cost of living is way higher than the suburbs of St. Paul, but they are making a go at it.  The cost of the sport is very high.  Each kid has 3-5 different pair of skis depending on what they are doing that day.  If you are really going to be good at this, you train all year.  Meaing the summer months you head very far south.  The kids are excelling at skiing, but talking with my buddy, he says there is no pay day for this sport, and I think many of the other Olympic type sports are the same.   But talking to him, he is not sure this is really all worth it.  You really only make any money after you become a superstar like the Lindsey or the Bode Millers of the world.  Then it is sponsorships or advertisements.  And in the meantime, the family has tossed their whole life at the sport for a chance this kids make it big.  And if they don’t, all other dreams are not meant.  Only he and his family can make this decision, and when they do, it will be tough. 

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3 hours ago, 406dn said:

Yesterday was the first time I've watched these games with any interest. That interest was to witness the greatness of Usain Bolt. He is the Olympics. There is no purer contest than sprinting. Every person ever born knows more or less how good they are/were at sprinting. Wayde van Niekerk also gave an epic performance by blowing away the field from lane eight and smashing the existing world record. 

 

Many of the sports now in the Olympics are events only a modest percentage of people have ever explored if they had a talent for it. They more obscure sports they add to the Olympics the more they dilute the games greatness to me.  

Bolt's triple in the 100 and the 400 world record were both something to behold.  That being said, humans weren't designed to be sprinters.  Sprinters are freaks of nature.  Pretty much everyone, however--assuming they're not too heavy and put in some work--can be pretty good at distance running.  We're not built to be cheetahs.  But we are built to run down plains game--if we keep at it long enough, and if they don't have a good place to hide.  Animals don't sweat effectively.  We do.  As a result, while we're not particularly fast, we can keep at it for a long time.  As interest in running a marathon grew, a lot of people found out that they really COULD run 26 miles.  Those who can do it in under 2 1/2 hours aren't very common, mainly because it takes a lot of training as well as some talent.  But a whole lot of people can do it in 4 hours or so.  And long before that time, most large plains animals will have tired out.  Then all you have to do is stick them with a spear or shoot them with a bow.

 

It will be interesting to see whether Mo Farah can double in the 5,000 after winning the 10,000, and whether Galen Rupp might make it onto the medal stand.  And the men's marathon will be the closing event.  Guys who can run 26 miles at a faster pace than I could ever run one mile . . . that's amazing.

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Dakota Dogman

Speak for your self Larry!  Some of us are more like Grizzly bears than long distance runners.  I've run enough to know that those guys who are 6' and a natural 150 lbs have a distinct advantage over those of us who are ... um.. not.  BUT everyone can wrestle. There is no one body style that will dominate, there is no one country that owns the sport.  WE are all capable of fighting for our own survival. The only ones who want to run are those who have figured out that they weren't any good at what we were created for!  :D

 

God Bless, 

 

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Nearly every great distance runner came to the realization they weren't fast enough in sprinting to make the cut. In a way, great sprinters are freaks of nature. Usain Bolt for the last eight years or so is the fastest human over a 100 or 200 meter dash on the planet. That sounds like a freak to me.

 

Now wrestling is for those who can't catch a ball and don't mind being anorexic/bulemic for periods of time. Except for the heavyweights, they don't have to live a live of deprivation.

 

 

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Good points.  Wrestlers wrestle people their own weight.

 

If you watch the running events, you'll see a distinct difference in body types between the sprinters and the distance runners.  You don't see fat on either of them, but you see larger bodies and larger muscles on the sprinters.  Distance runners--and the longer the distance, the more pronounced the body type--look like they've missed too many meals.  Marathoners in really good shape look almost anorexic.  And while they talk about great African distance runners, it's interesting to note that they're all (except some North African Arabs) from East Africa.  Particularly Kenyans and Ethiopians.  The Rift Valley.  Our country turns out a bunch of great black sprinters.  Why hardly any great black distance runners--other than African immigrants like Meb and Lagat?  Mainly because the slaves that came to this country were mainly of West African origin.  Different body type, much better suited to sprints than distance.  And if you look at the sprinters from Africa, especially the women, you'll see some very good ones from places like the Ivory Coast.  West Africa again.

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6 hours ago, Larry Brown said:

Good points.  Wrestlers wrestle people their own weight.

 

If you watch the running events, you'll see a distinct difference in body types between the sprinters and the distance runners.  You don't see fat on either of them, but you see larger bodies and larger muscles on the sprinters.  Distance runners--and the longer the distance, the more pronounced the body type--look like they've missed too many meals.  Marathoners in really good shape look almost anorexic.  And while they talk about great African distance runners, it's interesting to note that they're all (except some North African Arabs) from East Africa.  Particularly Kenyans and Ethiopians.  The Rift Valley.  Our country turns out a bunch of great black sprinters.  Why hardly any great black distance runners--other than African immigrants like Meb and Lagat?  Mainly because the slaves that came to this country were mainly of West African origin.  Different body type, much better suited to sprints than distance.  And if you look at the sprinters from Africa, especially the women, you'll see some very good ones from places like the Ivory Coast.  West Africa again.

Very interesting perspective..and a good one.

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On ‎8‎/‎15‎/‎2016 at 0:01 AM, Ben Hong said:

When and why did golf ever sneak into the Olympics??!!??

Ben, you may be surprised that golf and clays have a lot in common.  Both take a lot of practice to be good, both are best performed from a clear minded, relaxed state and both rely on sustained, consistent excellence to perform at high levels.  Over a 4 day period and 72 holes played, a golf win can often be by 2 or fewer strokes or tries.  Same with skeet and trap - 100 clays straight will win or tie, runner up has 98 to 99.  Winning is by the smallest of percentages.  Both also rely on swinging motion to perform.  One other thing I found in common with both - when I smoke a clay or a golf ball it feels the exact same way, like it's nothing at all.    BTW, I'm not good at either and find both to be very challenging.

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On ‎8‎/‎15‎/‎2016 at 6:06 AM, Brad Eden said:

Saw handball for the first time. I thought it was a soccer team fooling around or something....not....googled it. Never knew such a sport existed. Lots of obscure and not so obscure events in the Olympics I guess. I'm gonna rally support for Cornhole. Anyone else in?

I played in college - it is really fun but not many do it anymore.  It takes both hands to play well so one has to develop your off-hand.  Many may not realize this but racquetball was originally played on handball courts by tennis players using sawed of tennis racquets for winter practice.  Back then the courts were almost always empty as handball was fading out of existence.  My sophomore year I took a phys-ed class called handball and squash and played them all the way through grad school. 

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51 minutes ago, jeff88 said:

I played in college - it is really fun but not many do it anymore.  It takes both hands to play well so one has to develop your off-hand.  Many may not realize this but racquetball was originally played on handball courts by tennis players using sawed of tennis racquets for winter practice.  Back then the courts were almost always empty as handball was fading out of existence.  My sophomore year I took a phys-ed class called handball and squash and played them all the way through grad school. 

Different handball Jeff.  What Brad and I saw was a game sort of like water polo only on a court.  Two teams of 5 or 6 players each passed a nerf like ball around and would throw the ball at a small soccer like net protected by a goalie.  When the ball changed possession they would go to the opposite end with the other team on offense.

 

They called the game handball, I never heard of such a game.

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5 minutes ago, Rex Hoppie said:

Different handball Jeff.  What Brad and I saw was a game sort of like water polo only on a court.  Two teams of 5 or 6 players each passed a nerf like ball around and would throw the ball at a net protected by a goalie.  When the ball changed possession they would go to the opposite end with the other team on offense.

Thanks Rex!  Now I have no idea what game you just described above is, am I out of touch?  Many would say yes.  o.O

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19 minutes ago, jeff88 said:

Thanks Rex!  Now I have no idea what game you just described above is, am I out of touch?  Many would say yes.  o.O

 

27 minutes ago, Rex Hoppie said:

Different handball Jeff.  What Brad and I saw was a game sort of like water polo only on a court.  Two teams of 5 or 6 players each passed a nerf like ball around and would throw the ball at a small soccer like net protected by a goalie.  When the ball changed possession they would go to the opposite end with the other team on offense.

 

They called the game handball, I never heard of such a game.

 

Not the game handball that I know (uhhh....knew).

 

Nerf hole, maybe?

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Have been watching a bit every day.  So far the most amazing thing to me is how few people are attending, there are large numbers of empty seats for a lot of the events.  Right now my main interest is volleyball, both the men's and women's teams looking solid. 

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I was totally enthralled bu men's Trampoline. It just made me want to jump up and down.

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