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Just read Books 1 and 2 of Bernard Cornwell's Saxon Chronicles, waiting for 3 and 4 to show up at the library.  While I wait, I'm reading the first in his Sharpe's Regiment series, and John Alden Knight's Woodcock, which I got on eBay for $4.70.
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"Sharpe's Regiment" series is a great read. The TV rendition with Sean Bean was excellent as well...I watched it about 3 times over the years.
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Working on two right now.

In the middle of "Timberdoodle Tales" and I just started GBE's "An Affair With Grouse".

Brad lent me Timberdoodle Tales back in 03 while I was recovering from spine surgery. It's funny, in reading it again, I'm picking up on bits that I really don't remember from the first go around. Must have been all the meds the doc had me on.....

Picked up the trade edition of GBE's book for $44.60 shipped to my doorstep :)

Bryan

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After hearing some reviews here on the ever reliable UJ, I found a copy of Sheldon's "The Book of the American Woodcock" (perfect condition Abebooks.com $34 delivered).  I am enjoying it thoroughly and have found it an easy read for a scientific book.  

I'll get around to "The Count of Monte Cristo" soon...

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"Sharpe's Regiment" series is a great read. The TV rendition with Sean Bean was excellent as well...I watched it about 3 times over the years.

Agreed!

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Downtown Bang!

Just read Books 1 and 2 of Bernard Cornwell's Saxon Chronicles, waiting for 3 and 4 to show up at the library.  While I wait, I'm reading the first in his Sharpe's Regiment series, and John Alden Knight's Woodcock, which I got on eBay for $4.70.

Reading "Lords of the North" right now. Stands up to installments one & two so far. By looks of the waiting list at our local library I won't get to read the fourth in the series for some time.

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4 of my all time favorites;

Undaunted Courage - Stephen Ambrose

The story of Lewis and Clark and the Corps of discovery

Nothing Like It In The World - Stephen Ambrose

The men who built the Transcontinental Railroad

Blood and Thunder - Hampton Sides

"An Epic of The American West"

They Made America - Harold Evans

"From The Steam engine To The Search Engine"

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N E Grouse Hunter

4 of my all time favorites;

Undaunted Courage - Stephen Ambrose

The story of Lewis and Clark and the Corps of discovery

Nothing Like It In The World - Stephen Ambrose

The men who built the Transcontinental Railroad

Blood and Thunder - Hampton Sides

"An Epic of The American West"

They Made America - Harold Evans

"From The Steam engine To The Search Engine"

I'm a Stephen Ambrose fan as well, and thoroughly enjoyed the two you mentioned, as well as "The Wild Blue".

I just finished re-reading "Cache Lake Country" after seeing it mentioned here, and I'm doing the same with "Into The Wild". "Killer Spy" by Peter Maas is worth reading as well.

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I'm a Stephen Ambrose fan as well, and thoroughly enjoyed the two you mentioned, as well as "The Wild Blue".

I do enjoy his writing style, very interesting narratives, but mostly the focus he keeps on the "story" itself. It's hard to explain if you haven't read his books, but he definetly could make history interesting.

As a side note, while I never met him, his family cabin is about 1/4 mile from my dad's house. My daughter and I fish from the dock there a couple of times a year. His brother has a place on the opposite side of the lake and his wife and kids usually spend a week or two there every summer. I'm hoping to get the chance to meet them, but my work schedule usually has me out of town when they are there.

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N E Grouse Hunter

You won't be meeting the author any time soon, I hope. He died 10/13/2002. Interesting comment on his writing style; I fully agree.

There are some really good authors whose books take a few chapters for me to "adjust to their writing style". For example; John Rowlans' Cache Lake Country took me a while to adjust to his sparing use of punctuation marks. :<img src=:'>

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Actually I never even read any of his stuff until a couple years after his death. Also didn't know that his place was so close until just a year or so ago.

The other book I mentioned by Hampton Sides is also an easy read. His style is different from Ambrose, but he can keep you interested just the same. Maybe that has t do with choosing a good story to begin with, but I've tried to read some other Lewis and Clark books and found them to be so boring that I couldn't even finish. (maybe because I knew the ending....)

That would be a good topic, is it the story or the author that makes a great book? easy answer is both but I'm not sure.

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N E Grouse Hunter

The author makes the book in my eyes. I don't care how interesting the subject matter is, if it isn't well written, its just a bunch of words on a sheet of paper, IMHO.

I'm truly in awe of the true wordsmiths. Taking 26 letters, and crafting them into something so enjoyable is comparable to a work of art.

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Taking 26 letters, and crafting them into something so enjoyable is comparable to a work of art.

That might be the coolest analogy I've ever heard. Thanks.

I would agree, mostly, but "They Made America" stands out to me as a good counterpoint. The thing is written with all the flair and style of a textbook, but the stories it tells are just awesome. Check it out and see if you agree. The author (in this case), is just the narrator in a great documentory. Kinda like watching something on the the BBC, stories are cool, but told by a monotone,dry narrator. Still, the stories themselves hold your interest.

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N E Grouse Hunter

This thread caused me to reflect on some community service I was involved in many years ago. The enjoyment of reading a good book, or anything else, isn't shared by many of the millions among us.

It's hard to comprehend that 25 million Americans can neither read or write, and another 45 million are functionally illiterate ( reading and writing skills insufficient for normal practical needs).

One of the most gratifying and rewarding experiences I've enjoyed, was the year I spent teaching a illiterate man how to read and write. This man was no burden on society, holding down a decent full time job, with a nice home and wonderful family. He just happened to fall through the cracks when it came to his education.

It's amazing how well they can hide their handicap; I was shocked how well my student had hidden his. Meeting once a week at his home, we often had to quickly "hide the evidence" if unexpected company dropped by. He was a highly motivated candidate, and completed all his homework without complaint, eager to complete his next assignment.

I was thrilled to present him with a graduation gift at the end of the year we spent together. A book that he could now enjoy for the first time in his life. Although it was many years ago, I still remember the title; "Tall Trees,Tough Men".

I bought a copy for myself as well,..a reminder of a fruitful year with very deserving and grateful pupil.............

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