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Re: bleat calls

 

I took a stand in mid December and saw a coyote run by at about 50 yards right at sunset. I tried a bleat thinking maybe I could draw him back. Moving around the tree I was leaning on I saw a big buck looking at me in the exact location the coyote had run through. He, of course, made me but had clearly been drawn in from a short distance by the call.

 

Another time bow hunting from a tree stand I heard a couple obviously close bucks rattling/fighting. After about 5 minutes I tried a bleat & the fighting stopped. I gave it 30 seconds and tried a second bleat. The next thing I saw was two bucks running away.

 

Another time in a bucks only district I saw a doe & fawn working their way toward me. I was sitting on a ridge at the edge of a swamp. When they got to about 40 yards, as an experiment, I tried a couple soft bleats. They had to have heard me but COMPLETELY ignored me. They eventually walked by within about 15 yards. 

 

And another time a buddy and I were sitting in a ground blind at the edge of a pasture, when he said "did you hear that? I think a deer came in behind us & scented us". I bleated right away and a big doe ran out in front of us from the woods & he shot it.

 

My conclusion: It is possible to draw in a deer with a bleat call. But it is also possible to scare them with one. 

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Once I got into upland hunting I stopped deer hunting. Now that the dogs are gone I'm back into deer hunting somewhat and by no means an expert. The past several years I've realized:1) bucks in rut ca

My nephew killed a 10 point 250 pounder with a bow while smoking a cigarette and drinking a beer. Of course it was peak rut. I can't judge that buck, back in the day I too was often attracted to women

I try to enter the woods smelling like absolutely nothing. In the last few decades there has been a lot of talk about scent control and an extraordinary amount of products  to help control scent. To m

In my experience I can't think of any time using a bleat call would hurt. Maybe I've scared them away but couldn't tell. It's become routine for me. I'm convinced it's not gonna spook or scare deer and occasionally will bring in a buck and often does. I use it season through. Plus blind calling gives me something to do while dealing with the relative boredom of stand hunting in Maine. I often mix in some grunt calls right after the can bleat sequence. Can't say which was the trigger to getting a deer to investigate but pretty sure it's the bleat most often. 

 

Sometimes deer just plain ignore the bleat or calls in general. I took a tree stand this morning and a group of 2-3 does and as many fawns moved through at 8:20. Out of bow range so I bleated and I grunted as I watched them march away through the hard woods. They completely ignored all the calling and it was a quiet morning so I know they heard the calls. Go figure. 

 

As I mentioned before, once I called a spike horn up a ridge to where I sat with my back against a rock. He circled and would walk away and I wouldlet him get a distance and do the bleat again. He loped back up to me at least twice. I was looking for a bigger buck so let him go.

 

When I was new to bow hunting I fell under the spell of hunting fields where deer would enter before or at dusk. It's addicting actually seeing and watching deer but they aren't stupid and hurry out to a distance far enough from the wood line that they feel safe from predators and bow hunters. Finally after watching some deer from a stool I started hammering on my bleat call, which at the time was a thin reed between plastic strips that you held in mouth like a harmonica. I made it sound like a fawn was getting torn to shreds by a coyote, fawn distress calling to be exact. A big doe in the field couldn't resist coming to investigate. She came to within 30 yards and I shot with my old laminate Browning 2 wheel bow using fingers. It hit very low just behind a front elbow and I saw the arrow sticking out and twanging as she ran into the woods. I found her close to where she entered and the broadhead was imbedded in her heart. That was my first deer with a bow, and admittedly I really haven't shot many with a bow.

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Coyote hunting using the "doe fawn in distress" Primos remote call i have had a deer run back and forth when I was calling.

 

When it moved away it couldn't resist coming back to the call

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Never had much luck with calls. But I have tried them for fun during the rut when a doe walks by. It's weird how the doe will cover up it's private parts with it's tail and sneak away. LOL  Guess those are the ones that are tired of being continually harassed during the rut and aren't ready for romance. 

 

I did call in a black bear with a grunt call. Biggest black bear I've ever seen and had to be 450 pounds +. That was the first year Wisconsin had a separate season for bear and I didn't have a tag. The bear lucked out !

 

 

Virgil

 

 

Virgil

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I've created mock scrapes before but I am trying a scent dripper for the first time this season. What a racket. It's one of those camo covered bottles with the tube twisted in a circle. Supposedly when you fill it with scent and hang it with tube down it drips scent into a mock scrape depending on temperature or something. The 4 ounce bottle of scent it comes with lasted about a week and a replacement bottle of same scent costs $14. I'm into it for the dripper and two bottles so far...and have one doe on trail cam investigating it. I'm not sure how much more scent I'm willing to pay for waiting for a buck to start working the scrape which is within 100 yards of a new ladder stand I set up. I've never used scent much and when I did it never seemed to work. We'll see I guess.

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Brad, did you create a brand new scrape or set it up over an existing one?  I heard you're best bet is setting it up over an existing one.  When it drips, during the day when temp is higher, it is supposed to encourage the buck to try and get there in the daytime when the intruder is there.  I have one of those drippers sitting in the garage for the past few years, I never got to set it up.  Maybe I'll give that a try too.  Gonna have to pull out all the tricks this year.

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Scent control is a myth that manufactures made up to sell more product I know people that smoke on stand and get deer each year same as guys who just got off work that smell of all sorts of things they get deer.  Our forefathers never worried about scent control hell they would spend weeks in smoky camps never bathing wearing the same clothes day in day out they got plenty of deer.  Between clothing and washing products the market is multi millions each year don't get all wrapped up in it.

 

You want to get deer spend time in the woods where the deer are simple.  I hunt in a swamp very close to a local shooting range the gun fire does not bother the deer one bit there are also plenty of hiking and biking trails in the area again the people moving through leave plenty of scent and that doesn't bother the deer.

 

Get in on your stand early and stay late if you're not in the woods you're not getting deer.

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29 minutes ago, WPG Gizmo said:

Scent control is a myth that manufactures made up to sell more product I know people that smoke on stand and get deer each year same as guys who just got off work that smell of all sorts of things they get deer.  Our forefathers never worried about scent control hell they would spend weeks in smoky camps never bathing wearing the same clothes day in day out they got plenty of deer.  Between clothing and washing products the market is multi millions each year don't get all wrapped up in it.

 

You want to get deer spend time in the woods where the deer are simple.  I hunt in a swamp very close to a local shooting range the gun fire does not bother the deer one bit there are also plenty of hiking and biking trails in the area again the people moving through leave plenty of scent and that doesn't bother the deer.

 

Get in on your stand early and stay late if you're not in the woods you're not getting deer.

 

I'm guessing deer really love bacon.  Everyone loves bacon.  I usually smell like bacon.  Scent problem solved.

 

Perk

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Birdcountry70

I used to go full out with the scent control. Sprays,soaps ,detergents, keep my gear outside in a container with sagebrush and leaves in it etc. My end assessment was that it was a huge pain in the ass that didn't usually work.  I truly believe deer can smell the co2 we breathe out just the same way mosquitoes use it to find us.  My deer hunting became much more enjoyable when I said to heck with all that and just went back to hunting into the wind like my Dad taught me 35 years ago. This may not work in a place where there isn't as much wind as we have here. My area is rarely without an easily perceptible breeze.

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When I began bowhunting many moons ago, I was fanatical. The whole shebang, showering just before heading out to hunt, getting naked after parking truck and powdering my body with baking soda before putting on camo that was sealed with pine and spruce clippings...this was before all the scent products. Im a highly unsuccessful bow hunter compared to most and all that effort didn't pay off much. Now I try and keep myself from stinking like a hunters breakfast, but get lax as the season wanes. I initially wash all my camo, face mask, hats gloves etc in scent free detergent and keep it in a sealed duffle bag. Before heading to stand I spray down with some of the scent eliminating spray. When back home I hang the camo etc outside for a few hours until it goes back in duffle. If I know I will be bowhunting that day I will shower and shampoo with some scent free soap. But sometimes forget and am in the stand with hair that smells like a flower bouquet. I don't begrudge those who go to great lengths, they are likely more successful than me, but I just hunt any given stand regardless of wind and let the deer fall where they may. 

 

I do zero scent prevention when hunting deer with a rifle. And without sounding smug, I've done pretty well considering where I hunt.

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My nephew killed a 10 point 250 pounder with a bow while smoking a cigarette and drinking a beer. Of course it was peak rut. I can't judge that buck, back in the day I too was often attracted to women who smelled of cigarettes and beer during "peak rut" (otherwise known as closing time). It almost got me killed a couple times too. 

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I've seen deer come to campfires and cigarette smokers. The really big guys will just take off with a wiff of smoke but lots of smaller deer check the smoke out, I guess just out of curiosity.

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To me scent control means working with the wind and going clean.  I wash all my cloths with no soap, just water and a dash of bleach.  And after reading a book about tracking dogs, I brush my teeth before each hunt.  It said that scent to an animal is no one thing.  When you walk/move though an area, you disturb the soil, broken vegetation, etc. all have its own scent that make up a track.  As well as the sent that comes off your skin, hair, clothes and breath.  It said that breath is the most under rated component of scent and the writer believed is the major component of bird scent that bird dogs pick up on.  Which makes some sense if you think about it, your lungs vaporize your sent and put it right into the air stream and its the lightest, farthest traveling molecules.  My closest encounter with a deer came when I was wearing a carbon mask and it made me think maybe there's something to that.  Now I always brush my teeth before I hunt.  

 

This years been strange.  I've had two coyote come in to my stand and it was just amazing to watch their demeanor change, like the flick of a switch, when they detected my scent.  Both times I was down wind and they still managed to get me and both acted like catching human scent was like getting hit in the face with a brick; slam on the breaks and look straight in my direction.  We have night vision and hearing enhancement.  I can't wait until we invent supper smelling so we can see what its like to be able to smell that good.

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If wild turkeys had as good a sense of smell as do deer, we'd shoot a lot less of them.

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