Jump to content
Wisconsin

What's on your end table, right now?

Recommended Posts

LabHunter
quailguy

Sort of hopping back and forth between Henry Kissinger's "World Order" and Ron Susskind's "The One Percent Doctrine". World Order is kinda the distillation of all Kissinger's actions, knowledge and strategic thinking at age 93. Kissinger's experience  goes all the way back to being a very recent Harvard PhD in the Army CIC in post WWII Germany, where he was also involved with the dying OSS and the struggling to come alive brand new CIA, to being the best SecState since John Adams IMHO.

 

Susskind's book is really an attempted peek into the Bush 43 administration and the direction of VP Cheney of the response to 9/11. Sometimes good, sometimes suspect but interesting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sage Hen

Hemingway's The short Stories, Pheasants of the Mind by Datus Proper and the Sept./Oct. issue of Pointing Dog Journal.Oh and the Alliant 2016 Reloaders Guide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
topdog1961

I just finished Mathews Men and started to reread Japanese Destroyer Captain. I enjoyed Mathews Men because of its subject matter, merchant seamen, which I believe have received to little recognition. But like many modern WWII history books, it's written for a generation that knows little to nothing about the war, so a lot of backstory that should be common knowledge is explained. And I caught several errors such as the Japanese lost two carriers at Midway, and several inconsistencies in dates.  That annoys me in a book. 

 

On the other hand I really enjoy a good first hand memoir, and Japanese Destroyer Captain is one of the best. And as I type, the first Bloody Mary is gone. 

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jakeismydog2

The Old Man and the boy grows older

Last child in the woods

When Helping hurts

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rex Hoppie

My end table has a lamp on it.

 

My other end table has another lamp on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RuffChaser
3 hours ago, DennisMcFeely said:

"Timberdoodle Tales" by Tom Waters.

 

I'm reading the same.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Remo
1 hour ago, topdog1961 said:

I just finished Mathews Men and started to reread Japanese Destroyer Captain. I enjoyed Mathews Men because of its subject matter, merchant seamen, which I believe have received to little recognition. But like many modern WWII history books, it's written for a generation that knows little to nothing about the war, so a lot of backstory that should be common knowledge is explained. And I caught several errors such as the Japanese lost two carriers at Midway, and several inconsistencies in dates.  That annoys me in a book. 

 

On the other hand I really enjoy a good first hand memoir, and Japanese Destroyer Captain is one of the best. And as I type, the first Bloody Mary is gone. 

image.jpeg

 

Topdog, I read Japanese Destroyer Captain last winter and liked it. If you like naval warfare try Neptune's Inferno. It is the major naval battles off Guadalcanal, Hara was in those fights.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
topdog1961
16 minutes ago, Remo said:

 

Topdog, I read Japanese Destroyer Captain last winter and liked it. If you like naval warfare try Neptune's Inferno. It is the major naval battles off Guadalcanal, Hara was in those fights.

Read it, liked it also. I really like James Hornfischer, I don't find mistakes in his works. I've read all his books and enjoyed them, with the exception of his newest "The Fleet at Flood Tide", which I am looking forward to. I've pretty much only read WWII for 40 years. War is the ultimate human drama, and WWII was the ultimate war. Let's pray the biggest in human history. 

 

Samurai by Saburo Sakai is also an excellent memoir by a Zero ace. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bob Blair

51yq+513Q4L._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

 

I really like this book even though I only read a few pages each night before sleep takes over.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Felix

Undaunted Courage, It's the story of Meriwether Lewis. Of course the expedition with Clark to find a route to the Pacific is well covered but this book also goes into depth on Lewis's relationship to Thomas Jefferson. It was Jefferson's dream to find a route to the Pacific and open the west for a young American nation. Also covered is all the planning that went into the expedition and the aftermath. And the politics of the day. Both politics within the US and relationships between the US, England, France and Spain. I find it all very interesting.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wisconsin
12 hours ago, Rex Hoppie said:

My end table has a lamp on it.

 

My other end table has another lamp on it.

And between the two there ought to be enough light to read something. The UJ world wants to know what Rex reads. Or IF Rex can read more than one sentence at a time?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jazz4Brazo

Nothing exciting right now...just finished 

 

How Not to Be Wrong, The power of Mathematical Thinking.

 

And wait for it...half way through 

 

The Speed of Trust

 

It's a slow reader...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cold Iron

Interesting subject title, I just purchased 2 end tables and a sofa table to keep 3 books I have been after for awhile which I finally scored (2 have been out of print). The furniture was delivered last night and I will move them up to the living room sometime today. After I get rid of the old ones and all the junk on them.

 

Also interesting to me being retired Navy is the interest in Naval history books here. In SD about a month ago got to see the Admirals collection, had no idea that many existed. I like history also but now listen to Dan Carlin's Hard Core History podcasts when I get a chance.

 

w_snyder_ithacagunco_cov.jpg

 

w_snyder_37cov.jpg

 

And took me the better part of a year to find this one in hardback in like new condition.

9780931866739-us.jpg

 

So my winter reading is now taken care of. Have read most of Walt's 37 book now, haven't had time to touch the other 2.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mcgreg

Have been enjoying these 2 older dog training books. Am a fan of AbeBooks, it is amazing what can be purchased there at next to nothing. The Training Pointing Dogs paperback cost $3.65, shipped free!

Cheers!

IMG_1714.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×