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What's on your end table, right now?


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Hey Wisconsin aka Ken, have you ever considered putting together a book with your columns? I had some talks with the editors of the magazine I wrote an outdoor column for. It was a possibility since I

My end table has a lamp on it.   My other end table has another lamp on it.

Just finished Captsick's "Death in the Long Grass" for the ? time.    This morning, a good friend returned my copies of Ruark's "Horn of the Hunter" and Babcock's "My Health is Better in Nov

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Mike Connally
On 1/13/2017 at 6:28 AM, topdog1961 said:

 

I saw our company jet once. 

Our company had a bus....rented, I think.  

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On 3/10/2017 at 7:41 PM, Don Steese said:

 

 

What's the brown stuff in the glass?

Simply for medicinal purposes.

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On 3/10/2017 at 9:02 PM, Fishnfowler said:

"Astoria" by Peter Stark, the amazing story of white settlement in the Pacific NW.  Another non-fiction tale of the exact same era and equally as good is "Sources of the River," by Jack Nisbet.  "The River of Doubt" by Candice Millard, it is "Theodore Roosevelt's Darkest Journey."  Lastly, one of my favorites, "Journal of a Trapper," by Osborne Russell.  If you every wanted to get a good first-hand tale of what it was to be an early trapper, this is it.  Two of them are brand new to me and I just finished them, the others are old favorites.

 

I too greatly enjoy reading Osborne Russell's " Journal of a Trapper". He was a very literate man, given the life he chose to live. It is a gift to all to came after him, for him to have put his experiences to paper. It just happens to be that our home is very close to where he rode out one winter.

 

Presently I'm reading a biography of one of my favorite baseball players from back in the day, Tony Oliva. The man could flat hit a baseball.

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Sh*t My Dad Says - Justin Halpern.  Laugh out loud funny.  Basically a bunch of golden nuggets spoken from Father to Son

 

Across the Fence - John Meyer.  Accounts of recon missions in Vietnam, Cambodia.  Couldn't put it down.

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The War Journal Of Major "Rocky" Gause, forward by Stephen Ambrose. He was captured in the Philippines, escaped the Death March, swam to Corregidor, and escaped down island. That is the start of the adventure.

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Going through H H Munro's (Saki) short stories.  He's best known for the story The Interlopers which is probably in every high school short story anthology.book.

 

Interesting stories, each with a twist at the end.

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Mike Connally
On 3/15/2017 at 8:38 PM, Remo said:

The War Journal Of Major "Rocky" Gause, forward by Stephen Ambrose. He was captured in the Philippines, escaped the Death March, swam to Corregidor, and escaped down island. That is the start of the adventure.

Based on your recommendation I ordered this book. It's a great read. I second your recommendation. 

Truly one of the great adventures.  

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Mike, glad you liked it. Another good one on a WW2 theme is "Shots Fired in Anger" by Lt. Col. John B George. There are two different editions of this book and the one to get was published by the NRA.  It has an addendum of his Burma experience, the other does not. I didn't check Amazon but it would probably be in the used book section. Lt. George went through the Guadalcanal campaign and then volunteered for Merrill's Marauders, ended up behind Japanese lines in Burma.

 

  

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Vacation is great for reading fiction. Just got back from Key West where I did nothing except read, eat and sit by the pool. It was even too hot to fish! I finished "The Dark Side of the Mountain", by Bonnie Johnson, a historically based fictional account of my actual 4th great grandmother's capture by Indians in Virginia during the French and Indian war and her subsequent return. Also finished "The Dog Master" by Bruce Cameron, a fiction novel about the first dog to adopt a paleolithic man as a master. Interesting to contemplate.

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Anyone read this one?  I picked it up yesterday. For a guy who loves reading about WWII and loves dogs, it looks like a perfect read. It has great reviews and has been called a canine version of "Unbroken". Judy was an English Pointer born in Shanghai in 1936. She started the war as the mascot on a Royal Navy gunboat, and spent the war in the Japaneese POW system. I only read a few minutes before bedtime so if this sounds like something you would enjoy, don't wait on my review. 

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Just finished Henry Crumpton's "The Art of Intelligence" an excellent read for those of us interested in that sort of thing. Hank is a retired CIA senior officer who has been there and done that.

 

Am currently in "Marine !" by Burke Davis, a biography of the legendary Marine Chesty Puller. Puller is the only Marine to win 5 Navy Crosses and the originator of many Marine sayings and a man every Marine wants to emulate to this day. 

 

 5 Navy Crosses is amazing, particularly given the oft repeated thought that a guy gets a Navy Cross because no one, or no one in the Corps' good graces, could testify to the proposed citation, otherwise he would have been presented the Medal of Honor. Marcus Latrell (Navy Cross) comes to mind here; no one other than Marcus can truly testify what went down on that mountain in Afghanistan. ('Lone Survivor' is the book)

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Just finishing up Kicking Up Trouble: Upland Bird Hunting In The West by John Holt.

Next up is Western Skies: Bird Hunting In The Rockies And On The Plains by John Barsness.

In December, I'll be starting to read Michael McIntosh's series, Shotguns and Shooting.

Magazines within arms reach include: Fur Fish Game, Alberta Outdoorsmen, Shooting Sportsman and Maxim. (Gotta have something not outdoor related, although they did run an interesting article last Oct about Beretta)

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On 9/21/2017 at 7:52 AM, topdog1961 said:

Anyone read this one?  I picked it up yesterday. For a guy who loves reading about WWII and loves dogs, it looks like a perfect read. It has great reviews and has been called a canine version of "Unbroken". Judy was an English Pointer born in Shanghai in 1936. She started the war as the mascot on a Royal Navy gunboat, and spent the war in the Japaneese POW system. I only read a few minutes before bedtime so if this sounds like something you would enjoy, don't wait on my review. 

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Loved this book.  We actually received an additional copy.....which then ended up in another UJer's hands.  I hope he enjoyed it as much as we did.

 

Pointers are absolutely amazing dogs.......but Judy, the pointer and subject of this book, lived a life unlike most that are destined to be bird dogs.  I won't go into details as that would spoil the read......if you have interests in dogs and WWII, get this book.  Pass it on to another dog enthusiast when done.

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