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I'm starting to plan for my first ever Elk hunt in 2018 and came across a course online "Elk101" it gets solid reviews and for $100 its worth a try just wondering if anyone has heard of or used it.

Mark

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Good luck on your Idaho hunt. Not a lot of big bulls there but sometimes you can get lucky and nail a big one. This is my best raghorn Idaho bull...not super big or exceptional but still a nice animal

Here are some bone shots from one of the "coveted" areas...             Elk are a really awesome species to hunt and they live in some of the mos

This is key.  In most instances elk are highly mobile and much more of a herd animal.  Getting and staying in contact with the herd is your biggest challenge on public land.

Guided or self-guided?  The places I hunted elk all seemed to have their own strange ways about them. Elk are elk but some come running to a call and others run from it dependent on when and where, others seem to linger for hours and some seem like their on a caffeine high and never settle down. At least that's the way it was in the different states I hunted.

 

Doesn't hurt to know the basics but I don't know if I would pay for an on-line course for something unless there's something about this course I don't know about.  My suggestion would be to hire a well known guide if this is your first elk hunt.  You can learn a lot by doing this if you pay attention to what he (or she) does when glassing, calling and knowing when to scoot or be still, when to rake the ground and when to cow call, etc.  If you do this and research on-line before you go you can probably put things together for yourself on your next elk hunt

 

YMMV

 

 

Virgil

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PartridgeCartridge

Elk hunting is its own special type of hunting. I've been on 8 back country hunts, including some of the coveted areas. Before you spend any money, ask yourself what you want out of the hunt.

 

High country wilderness horseback and wall tent camps are the classic style. Are you looking for  the whole experience or just to put an elk on the ground?

 

I went through the whole process of wanting to simply kill an elk through wanting something close to 400 antler inches. Enjoyed every minute of it, killed a cow, some lesser rag horns and ended up with a fantastic  6x8 390 class bull in the end.

 

What do you want out of the hunt?

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Lots of good questions, thats why we decided to look as far out as 2018 or 19. I prefer self guided but this may be an exception, I was listening to a podcast with course founder and it sounded like lots of great information for the cost of a couple of my bar tabs and coupon codes seem to float around to reduce it further,I also have books on my shelf that i used to use get the same information from and the how to uses for google earth section may be worth it alone. I'll report back on how it goes.

MS

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PartridgeCartridge

I can tell you that elk hunting is nothing like whitetail hunting. And, depending on your target destination, physical conditioning will be critical to your success.

 

Have you at least figured out where you want to hunt and what species? I'm assuming Rocky Mountain elk.

 

Before you spend some coin on elk hunting info, try to narrow down your budget, destination, species and weapons choice.

 

Things become easier to distill after you can answer those questions.

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10 minutes ago, PartridgeCartridge said:

I can tell you that elk hunting is nothing like whitetail hunting. And, depending on your target destination, physical conditioning will be critical to your success.

 

Have you at least figured out where you want to hunt and what species? I'm assuming Rocky Mountain elk.

 

Before you spend some coin on elk hunting info, try to narrow down your budget, destination, species and weapons choice.

 

Things become easier to distill after you can answer those questions.

I've never hunted elk, but the advice given by PC sounds like a solid way to go about it in a way to not overthink it. 

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Good advice here.

 

Physical conditioning can't be overemphasized. Elk live in big steep country and your ability to get around in it is crucial to succeeding. Good luck

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You might check out the Colorado Parks & Wildlife site. They have what they call "Elk Hunting University" on there.

 

Here is a link.     http://cpw.state.co.us/learn/Pages/EHU.aspx

 

I don't really elk hunt so I never read it all. It seems pretty in depth but I don't really know. Might be something in there for you...its free.

 

The CP&W also have what they "Hunt Planners". People you can call with questions about hunting. Phone number is on the main Big Game website page. Some of the guys that answer questions are pretty good and some not so much. They might have more info specific to Colorado tho, but it doesn't hurt to ask questions just about hunting elk in general.

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You could probably google "elk hunting tips" and come up with a ton of "advice" on hunting elk, along with some utube videos on how to bugle, cow call, etc. Probably need to sift through some of the BS, but there should be some good, valid information, without needing to spend $100.00 on an Elk University video.

 

Being in good condition is a prerequisite of elk hunting, if for nothing else but the packing of the meat, unless you go with a guided hunt. The country that elk inhabit is big rough country, and you may need to cover some tough ground as quickly as possible.

 

I attribute, partially, the packing of game animals, including plenty of elk, since I was approximately 14 years old (62 now), to a bad hip! 

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If you are DIY, the course is probably worth it.  That website and Corey (I believe he's good friends with Randy Newberg as well) are built for the DIY'er and are probably the best at it at this time.  If I didn't have a couple of friends that were helping/guiding me on my first DIY backcountry hunt this past year I would have taken the course.  I know one of them took it, and did not complain about wasting money (he took it when it was intro'd at $50).  I/we have been on that site frequently when leading up to hunts.  One of the best resources for a DIY.

Another site to check out is rokslide.com.  Good reviews on gear there as well.   

 

My advice is to join the site first, there are great articles on there.  Then if you feel the need, take the course. 

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Now that I have this going may as well take advantage of all the suggestions and advice I can get, some background if it helps.

First off i have a complete blessing from the wife so Im half way there, Money is always a consideration but not my biggest problem so far I have a budget of 5k to get this done but that could change.

I'm 54 5'10" 170 in bird shape but not backcountry shape but that will come I'm having a full knee replacement next month Doc says if all goes well and I wear a brace I'm the same as  anyone else.

as far as place for now Montana or Idaho not enough time to get points so we are planning over the counter DIY hunt group of 3-4 with one guy having been on several similar trips would like to do archery but nothing is off the table yet including other species. If I can nail down a general area i have time to do a scouting trip or two next year with a fly rod or shotgun depending. 

I realize I sound naive but Im willing  to do the research,spend the time and make the effort to do this so go easy on me.

 

 

 

 

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I will say that I was fortunate that the guys I went with had done it 3 times before I went, so that helped a lot.  I did the whole thing, tags and mostly new gear for under $2500.  The $2500 included borrowing a tent, but that still would have been under $2500.  We were archery and backpack/spike camping, so clothing, food etc was limited to what we could carry back.  Gas out and back from PA was one of the largest expenses.  

Need to decide what you want out of it.  We wanted to hike back, set up camp and hunt from there.  Biggest expense in gear was a quality sleeping bag and pad.  If you are hunting from a truck or camper, lots more options.  

 

Funniest part of our trip, a guide is back in an area my buddy and I got to.  He and his client are on horses.  We walk over and start talking,

he says "Where'd you come from?"

Me "Over there"

Him, "How'd you get here?"

Me "Walked"

His client, whispering "Did they walk all the way here?" 

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that's "priceless" Im leaving from western ohio so gas will be big also, I may need a different bow but I'm expecting a meat backpack and maybe a different sleeping bag, tags could be a bigger number. 

this to me is all about the experience, meat would be great but I don't count birds when I hunt or trout etc. so success is measured differently

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"The experience".

 

IMO there is not a better time to be in the mountains than the last 10 days of Sept. Good weather...(for the most part), leaves are turning, crisp mornings, and elk bugling. You usually have to go high, but that's a good thing too. Tough...but good.

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