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4 hours ago, PartridgeCartridge said:

This one female grizz that would raid our camp in Alberta also had the odd habit of eating our turds in an area about 75 yards from camp. Everyone crapped in this one spot. There was no outhouse in a high country camp.

 

Anyways, every morning at about 4 am, I would have a cup of coffee and  meander over there to crap. It is difficult to squat, 25 degrees below zero, holding a Maglite in you teeth, cradling a loaded rifle, in the dark, surrounded by fresh grizzly tracks, while your nutsack is literally freezing, and juggling a roll of toilet paper and trying to drop a load.

 

That bitch ate every turd in camp, including the two dog's in camp.

 

It was exciting and frustrating and scary all in one very cold package.

 

Without pictures it is just , well not so much in your case, a Tall Tale!

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Good luck on your Idaho hunt. Not a lot of big bulls there but sometimes you can get lucky and nail a big one. This is my best raghorn Idaho bull...not super big or exceptional but still a nice animal

Here are some bone shots from one of the "coveted" areas...             Elk are a really awesome species to hunt and they live in some of the mos

This is key.  In most instances elk are highly mobile and much more of a herd animal.  Getting and staying in contact with the herd is your biggest challenge on public land.

 I haven't taken any destinations off the list but all my efforts right now are on Idaho one big reason is I can get 2-3 scouting etc trips in before the real show. I generally do an early spring fishing trip and a fall upland hunt with two different groups I think I can sell the destination to both plus a rafting/hiking trip with my kids should be doable. 

I'm open to any sources of information  Idaho fish and game is a great resource and my poster size map is in the mail, I'll do my homework not trying to cut corners but would appreciate any suggestions or advice.

MS

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I have friends that were in Idaho a couple times.  Changed because wolves had decimated the population.  Next time I see them I will find out where they were.  Might help eliminate an area for consideration. 

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Last years elk surveys showed cow/calf ratios in the Panhandle were on par with the heyday years, pre wolf introduction. The numbers were knocked down some with wolf introduction, but with opening of wolf hunting and trapping, coupled with some mild winters, the numbers were back up. The F&G is conducting it's survey now, so this years numbers should be posted on the ID F&G website in a month or so.

 

My mom called last week, to say they had 18 head of elk in their front yard.

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I'm lucky enough to live in the middle of prime elk country in Idaho and my son and I do pretty well on our hunts. Scouting is very important but as has been stated elk cover a lot of ground and the closer to your hunt time the more valuable scouting becomes. They can be a long way from where they were in a short time, especially when the weather changes. Good luck it's an experience you are not likely to forget.

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Prime elk hunting spots are guarded perhaps more closely than prime chukar spots. However (and you may already know this), if you go to the Idaho Fish and Game website you can look up the odds of bagging an elk in particular hunting units.  You will want to look up the "Harvest Statistics."  That will at least get you in an area that is likely to be productive.  Actually finding the elk . . . that is what scouting is for.

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thanks to all for the information and tips, even being maybe 2 years out at this point this adventure has already had a positive impact giving me and the boys things to talk about they watch  you tube I read web sites, changing some eating habits, researching gear, my 13 yr old figured out the gym can do good things its been fun hope it lasts. 

I think I mentioned that a lot of this depends on what the surgeon says tomorrow about my knee replacement and ACL repair at the most it might change our location but all else should be good.

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PartridgeCartridge

Good luck on your Idaho hunt. Not a lot of big bulls there but sometimes you can get lucky and nail a big one. This is my best raghorn Idaho bull...not super big or exceptional but still a nice animal.

 

bigelk.jpg

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wow that is one really really small guy

wait, PC he's wearing the same hat you are in those pictures you posted

Edited by MSchafer
additional ball busting of a member
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One hundred bucks is a fraction of what this trip is going to cost. I'm not familiar with that pay to read site, but getting good intel is always a plus.

I lived in part of the best elk country for many years. One of the biggest keys was learning the land; where they migrate from, where they're going to, where the resident herds are, where they go when they're spooked. It's big country and  takes time to learn it. If you could possibly make a scouting trip beforehand in 2017 that would  be a big advantage. 

 

You can make a DIY hunt and  even if you don't connect you can have a great time.  But boots on the ground and learning the territory is the wild card that makes for success with elk. Being young and tough helps too. ( I'm old, stove up, and try not to pack anything heavier than a chukar or pheasant;)

 

If it's in your budget, going with a guide or going with knowledgeable elk hunters will sure shorten the learning curve. 

Meanwhile practice shooting at long ranges, get in shape, read everything you can. Get outside and try walking in dead dry leaves w/o  noise.  Get good with a GPS plus old fashioned compass and topo maps.  State G&F websites are a good source of information to see which area produce a high percent of success

 

Oh yeah, many grizzlies in Wyoming, Montana, Idaho have learned that a gun shot equals a gut pile. Some areas require carrying bear spray. 

If you're on UJ you probably have some pretty good outdoor skills already, Best of luck in your trip plans for the hunt.

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Had my Dr appointment went in expecting to be getting a full knee replacement on the right side came out with surgery scheduled to replace the ACL and a clean up on the left one,guy seemed pretty amazed that I could walk little'lone cary a gun through the fields of NE. turns out the brace setup I wear on the right side is stronger than new parts and stronger that most guys real knees.. This all means less time off work (the only down side of self-employment) an could make getting a guide or at least a pack in more feasible 

 

I have a good friend that was an elk guide in the north zones of ID before the wolf reintroduction he's still not sure if he's in on the trip but offered up any info he could give and contacted some guys he knows out there still ,also getting some great information from a couple UJ members.

 

getting bows is about the next thing on the list I blame my with for my sons being left handed and doubling the cost of everything

 

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Speedgoat44

Elk hunting public land can be tricky - I agree that $100 is a drop in the bucket for what this whole deal is going to cost, plus you'll get psyched up by all of the info you're learning.  The main thing I've found is that to hunt elk, you need to spend a to of time in good country.  Sometimes you roll out of bed and shoot an elk on opening day, but sometimes you it can take days or weeks to get your chance.  My strategy has always been to hunt good country as often as possible.  Elk get pushed around a lot, but during archery, they stick around a little longer.  They are still acting like elk, and when the rut is on they can be a lot of fun.  Rifle season is a different animal - elk retreat quickly to private ground with all of the shooting and atvs.  Good elk country isn't hard to find - it's just hard to get to sometimes.  A conversation with a G&F person will point you in the right direction, but the rest is up to you.  Most guys I know, including myself, get into elk once we've wandered more than a mile or two from roads.  That's a 30min-2hr hike, depending on topography.  I've never wanted to spike-camp in because I want to give the elk enough space to feel safe.  I think a camper is a great idea in elk country.  A good night's sleep is a big deal.  Also, you don't want to pack one much more than a couple of miles generally - plus with warm Septembers (and Octobers) meat spoilage is a concern.  I hunted a wilderness area with a couple of buddies last year - we were 4 miles from camp and had elk below us in the timber.  They hung up and never gave us a shot...by the time I made it out that deadfall-choked elk hidey-hole, feelings of disappointment yielded to profound relief.  One elk would've been marginally doable, but 2 or 3 packjobs would've taken me down.  I'm not an expert elk-hunter, and am becoming increasingly lazy as an elk hunter, so my advice is not worth much!  Good luck to you - the best part of elk-hunting is just being there.  I hope you enjoy your hunt!

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I did end up buying the course after finding a coupon code and got it for $55 so far it is worth the money to me having no experience what so ever, but as others have said there is nothing in it that isn't available elsewhere if you knew where to look or what to look for. As I said I'm happy with it but I went back and started over and used it more as an outline to reach out further on each subjects and skip things like building points in states I don't want to go to etc. From what I've seen so far it could certainly be much better and some things are already out of date and haven't been updated to new laws and regs. Cory is not getting rich off this and I think he is genuine in his ambition to bring more people into the field and he offers a few discounts on products he endorses some I wanted to try or do use so in the end it will end up about free. I report back when I'm all the way through it, one pet peeve would be you only get one year access to the info.

 

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If your serious about do it yourself elk hunting I would buy over the counter archery tags in Colorado and just try hunting any elk, there's a definite learning curve and that is probably the lowest cost hunt for out of staters.

 

It's a lot of fun but it's also a very tough hunt physically.

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