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MAArcher

Plantar Fasciitis - How'd you deal with it?

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Allen McCallie

Had it diagnosed about 25 yeas ago and had custom plastic arch supports made for both my feet (by a physician).

 

They helped immensely, and I continue to use them in all of my shoes (I just move them from pair to pair.)  I am confident that if I did not wear them the PF would return, with a vengeance.

 

Good luck.

 

Allen

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Brad Eden

Wow, very timely subject. Everyone has pretty much covered this. About 15 years ago I got PF in both my feet. As described, it hurt like hell. I only go to a doctor, never mind a specialist, unless I absolutely have too. I had too. Diagnosed as PF, and was told I would eventually have to have surgery. No way. I did many of the stretching exercises as described here and got better supported shoe and boot inserts. It eventually completely went away in its own. 

 

Three weeks ago, I was spending the day doing a bunch of muddy and strenuous yard and woodlot work and put on an old pair of hiking boots rather than mess up my newer boots. They had little arch support. Woke up the next morning with PF in my left foot arch and ball of my foot. Been a pain in my ass ever since. I'm doing stretches and went and got new inserts for the boots and shoes I wear every day. Nothing that expensive, just pharmacy grade gel inserts. It's getting better.

 

The cartoon below pretty much explains my life at the verge of 60 years old. Very funny, but true.

 

IMG_0299.JPG

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Bullwinkle

True PF will feel like you have a rock between your heel and your boot. Search the net for DIY PT.  The 2 that seem to do the most are standing with your toes on a step and slowly lower your heel below the step. The other is stand back from a wall and keeping your feet flat do slow pushups against the wall. 

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Steve Hunts

A timely topic for me as well as I sit on the couch for day 5 following Tendon Fixation for Achilles Insertional Tendinopathy. Tightness in foot and Achilles led to painful bone spurs. I elected to have surgery on the right foot first. If you are feeling pain get on it before it's too late. Even hydromorphone barely touches the post surgery pain. I am barely able to crutch 20 feet to the bathroom. Without the foot elevated pain is immense. Nerve pain blocks were necessary following surgery as the pain was so severe I went into shock.

 

never have I experienced anything like this before. Take care of your feet!

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walks with gun

    Mine got so bad I went to my Orthopedic surgeon who by chance is a runner along with his kids.  He started me on a series of stretches that made a world of difference.  It might be stupid, but when my back goes out, so do my feet, it seems a whole series of stretches are in order and a occasional trip to the chiropractor helps.

 

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KerryLuft

Stretching, the sleep boot, the frozen water bottles and better shoes with prosthetic arch supports solved it for me.

 

I went to a sports orthopedist for the inserts ... glad I did.

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Remo

Same for good arch supports. I waited to see the doctor until I couldn't stand to walk across the yard. He sold me a set of insert arch supports that the local hospital carries in their Health Care Accessories Store. The relief was immediate and got better each day. 

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MAArcher

Hopefully I will get a chance to try some arch supports soon.  But right now I can't even walk and my foot is starting to swell.  I lucked out and got an appointment with a podiatrist first thing in the morning.  Man I really want some drugs and a few hours of sleep.

 

Kind of surprised at how many of us have had to deal with it but I guess it makes sense given how many miles we put on following those dogs.

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bobman

with super feet your foot type determines which color coded version is appropriate go to a good sports shoe store and have your feet tested 

 

mine are blue yours might require green

 

diclofenac is appropriate but it takes time to work

 

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CzechSM
42 minutes ago, MAArcher said:

Hopefully I will get a chance to try some arch supports soon.  But right now I can't even walk and my foot is starting to swell.  I lucked out and got an appointment with a podiatrist first thing in the morning.  Man I really want some drugs and a few hours of sleep.

 

Kind of surprised at how many of us have had to deal with it but I guess it makes sense given how many miles we put on following those dogs.

 

Don't rule out gout as a contributor. 

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Uplander

I had it years ago.  My cure was to wrap the arch tightly at night before going to bed.  I ok a few months to go away.

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Virgil Kane
13 hours ago, bobman said:

with super feet your foot type determines which color coded version is appropriate go to a good sports shoe store and have your feet tested 

 

mine are blue yours might require green

 

diclofenac is appropriate but it takes time to work

 

 

 

The way Superfeet were explained to me the Green (Verde) have the smallest heel cup and stabilize the back of the foot more than the other colors. Very important so the Achilles doesn't get rocked back and forth while walking.  Don't know if that's true or not, green worked for me but if you have a wide heel they may not work for you.  Best to go somewhere that has them and see what fits your foot the best.

 

 

Virgil

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stevehaun

Nearly all maladies of the foot result from wearing shoes. We evolved to walk barefoot - not with a 1" heel and narrow toebox limiting movement of our forefoot.  Heels result in shortening of the achilles tendon.  Narrow toe boxes squeeze our toes together.  All the treatments listed above, icing, stretching, splinting, orthotics, insoles will work to heal plantar fasciitis.  However, "supportive" shoes and orthotics act as a splint.  Splints are temporary measures and will weaken the foot over time.  To prevent plantar fasciitis, you need to strengthen the foot.  This is best accomplished by not wearing shoes.  You can start by not wearing shoes in the house and gradually expand you horizons.  For outdoors, find a shoe that is flat and has a generous toe box.  Lems shoes would be one example.  Gradually wean off daily use of orthotics and inserts.  

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MAArcher

Just got back from a podiatrist who himself has PF, to the extent of a lot of physical therapy and two failed surgeries.  He told me to stretch my calf muscle, l long 5 minute stretch, each morning while I brush my teeth, for the rest of my life.  Short/multiple stretches are not as good. The calf muscle and Achilles tendon pulls the plantar too tight against the heel bone causing inflammation and pain.  Also, wear good footwear with a heel which will also help reduce the rubbing that causes the inflammation.  Ice as needed.  He said it sounds like my PF was acute, which hurts more but responds better to treatment than chronic PF.   He said if it becomes chronic and more help was needed I could try wearing one of the night time braces/socks.  He said to be sure to stretch the calf, and not confuse that with exercising it and making it stronger/tighter, the goal is to lengthen the calf muscle.  

 

After a lot of ice yesterday and no walking around, I went to bed feeling better and actually got some sleep until a little discomfort woke me up just a half hour before the alarm.  I was able to walk into the doctors office without crutches so I feel a lot more optimistic.  Hopefully another day of sitting on my ass and ice and some stretching I'll be able to at least take the dog out for a short walk tomorrow.

 

Stevehaun, I think there's a lot of merit to going barefoot, unfortunately there just isn't a lot of opportunity.  I already spend all time away from work either barefoot or in Teva's, unless its cold out then I wear good boots.  I actually think this "flareup" was the result of not taking the time to lace my boot tight enough.  I didn't feel supported and was walking on really uneven ground.

 

Thanks for all the insight!

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bobman

I went to the local New Balance running shoe store (my daughter was a cross country star in college) she had a friend that worked there and is a professional runner ( heck I didn't even know that was a profession).

 

The guy knew more about feet than you could imagine, after examining my feet and putting me on this scale lookin thing that determines where the loads are on your soles he sold me a pair of shoes and super feet for daytime use. He also insisted i shouldn't ever walk without any shoes even to the bathroom at night. 

 

I told  him I am an old guy and have to pee three times a night and I wasn't about  to put my shoes every time so he recommended these special anti plantar facitis flip flops to wear at night for like $50.  At the time I was wondering if I was being put on lol.

 

Bottom line is my feet healed in a couple weeks and still feel great years later.

 

My podiatrist didn't do anything for me but put me on diclophenac for six months and tell me to stretch with zero relief

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