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What do you carry on your lanyard?


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Analogous to the thread on "what's in your bag?", what do you carry on your  lanyard (other than the obvious whistle or whistles)?  

 

I have had customers request that I equip lanyards to carry some rather unusual items, but my favorite is the customer who requested that I find and attach a pill fob on a clip on the left leg of his T2 whistle lanyard so that he could "be prepared for emergencies and opportunities."  Curious, I asked what he intended to carry.  He said, "Nitro glycerin pills and Viagra!".   I believe he was a pheasant hunter.

 

But seriously, I am interested in what y'all carry.  Thanks.

 

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Well, as a matter of fact, your whipping is better looking than that I cover with braided knots.  To improve the "floppy" in the nylon on your lanyard you might experiment with wipe on or spray on pol

I only carry a whistle and a compass on my Knotsmith lanyard. The Pheasant is not attached to the lanyard, though that would look kinda cool.  ;~)   This lanyard also serves as a short leash

First, I freely admit that the current web page is a maze, I apologize for that, and yes, most folk just call up and say, "Here's what I want to carry, and I like (this or that) picture on the web pag

charlo slim
1 hour ago, rawhide said:

He said, "Nitro glycerin pills and Viagra!".

 

Oh, there's a difference?

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UplandHntr

Its a blaze orange $2.00 lanyard and one

blaze ornage spaniel whistle. And the whistle is usually tucked in a top vest pocket. 

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OH Grouser

Just a whistle and key for the truck, strung on a paracord lanyard...a far cry from a Knotsmith work of art.

 

Roger

 

59622d4fa29f5_IMG_20170709_090607_6511.thumb.jpg.ec16470cbc3ae83e05bfc60c351efe11.jpg

 

 

 

 

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A whistle like the one above and a tru-nord compass. Both tucked in to a breast pocket so it does not get hung up at the gun mount.

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two identical whistles because I drool watching bird dogs do their thing and they freeze up in cold weather

 

a truck key is a good idea I might add one to my lanyard

 

 

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Steve Hunts

Two identical whistles here as well. Spare truck key in wallet.

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Many years ago I bought what I thought was a nice braided leather lanyard to show off three bands from ruffed grouse I shot in the '80's. And a few years later I added a band from a pheasant I shot in Nebraska. 

 

Just a couple of years ago while quail hunting in New Mexico I felt something hit my boot near the truck. The old lanyard had broken and it was my whistle I felt. I was sick for about 30 minutes on my hands and knees searching for those bands. Luckily, I found all of them and they sit on my desk waiting for the day when I can rationalize a Knotsmith lanyard.  

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Thanks.  While I appreciate the accolades, I am not trying to sell lanyards here by asking the question, nor is it my intent to compare the lanyard you have with those I have made.  I am interested in what you carry, how you use your lanyard, how well it works,  and what that might offer toward lanyard design.  I have made and used many lanyards over the past 60 years or so.  I had different purposes for lanyards at different times and for different activities and always tried to make a lanyard that served those purposes.   I enjoyed that challenge, and today I still enjoy challenges presented by customer requests.  

 

I got serious about functional lanyard design when I made the early T2 lanyards:  The braids on T1 lanyards I had been making were rather limp.  Whistles and whatever else one carried on those lanyards tended to swing to and fro and get in the way when one walked.  The response was to carry the whistle on the right leg (if you were right handed), and everything else on the left leg.  Then the slide was adjusted so the right leg was short, just long enough to allow the whistle to be put in the mouth, and the left leg was long.  Items on the left leg were then tucked into the left shirt pocket or inside the bib on Carhartt overalls.  That worked, but the question that nagged me was could I design and make a lanyard braid that had enough body to minimize the swinging.  I realized that design goal in the T2 lanyards by selecting a nylon cord core with enough body to dampen the swing.  

 

Over the years, I evolved a broader "lanyard design philosophy" of sorts that is summarized as follows:

 

In my opinion, a custom braided lanyard should be comfortable to put on and off and wear. It should comfortably and securely carry what you want/need to carry.  That is, the length should be optimal so that whistles and other items should carry where you want them to and should not swing about excessively while you walk. 

 

The lanyard should position and present carried items so that they are convenient and efficient to use.  Lifting a whistle is to the mouth should not lift other items on the lanyard.  If you decide to keep the whistle in your mouth, other items should not be pulling down on it.  

 

Finally, your lanyard should "look great."  This is a matter of personal taste, of course, and you should indulge your preferences.  Obviously, how a lanyard looks might not be nearly as important as the above points, and in fact, may not be of any significance in some cases.  There are folk who are not interested in "a work of art."   

 

Obviously, the design challenges increased when presented with requests to carry such items as counters, compasses, quail calls, small knives, various shotgun tools, transmitters, controllers, keys, etc.  When we carried only whistles, the typical swivel and McMahon scissor snaps worked well enough (because we seldom removed the whistle from the snap, a rather difficult task).   However, for items that are to be put on and off a lanyard with any frequency, mini or micro clips work much better. I am always looking for better ways to carry things on a lanyard.  That is why I am interested in what you are carrying and how you carry it. 

 

To the final point, appearance, braided kangaroo leather looks great, but underneath that, the nylon cores do the work.  Obviously paracord, as is or braided, would serve if one liked that look.  I am limited by how many lanyards I can make per year.  Therefore,  I choose to make lanyards that work well and look good.  To me that means braided kangaroo leather and brass hardware (compasses, whistles, and counters) rather than plastic.  And there are a few other design features.  So far, I've always been able to sell as many lanyards as I can (or want) to make per year. 

 

But, to repeat, I am always trying to improve lanyard designs and meet customer requests.  In the past that goal produced the T2 Lanyard and its options and accessories, the T3 Leash Lanyards, the T2Call Lanyards, the TFLY fishing lanyards, the Utility Lanyards and others.  Again,  I appreciate your telling me what you carry and how you use your lanyards. Or what you would you carry on a lanyard if you could?  Thanks!

 

Larry

 

PS.  Want to a make a lanyard for yourself?  We can talk about that too.

 

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Crazy Horse

I only carry a whistle and a compass on my Knotsmith lanyard. The Pheasant is not attached to the lanyard, though that would look kinda cool.  ;~)

 

This lanyard also serves as a short leash that I sometimes use when crossing roads.

 

 

Lanyard.jpg

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Carry two Whistles.  One has a compass on it.  Sophie will respond to either one.  I need to get a flush counter for when I go on trips where they actually have birds.  Don't need it here in a Va unfortunately. 

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18 hours ago, charlo slim said:

 

Oh, there's a difference?

Ah, well, I don't know from personal experience, but I have heard of cases wherein the "opportunity" to use Viagra might have led to a subsequent, "emergency" need for nitro glycerin pills.  But I can't correlate that with the need to carry both on a whistle lanyard.  Or at least I did not and am not willing to explore that.

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8 hours ago, OH Grouser said:

Just a whistle and key for the truck, strung on a paracord lanyard...a far cry from a Knotsmith work of art.

 

Roger

 

59622d4fa29f5_IMG_20170709_090607_6511.thumb.jpg.ec16470cbc3ae83e05bfc60c351efe11.jpg

 

 

 

 

Hey!  That works.  I am a firm believer in and practitioner of carrying a truck key on a lanyard clip.  And as for art and priorities, an old oilfield saying comes to mind:   "I had rather have one that works as opposed to one that merely looks good......"     

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4 hours ago, Randy S said:

Many years ago I bought what I thought was a nice braided leather lanyard to show off three bands from ruffed grouse I shot in the '80's. And a few years later I added a band from a pheasant I shot in Nebraska. 

 

Just a couple of years ago while quail hunting in New Mexico I felt something hit my boot near the truck. The old lanyard had broken and it was my whistle I felt. I was sick for about 30 minutes on my hands and knees searching for those bands. Luckily, I found all of them and they sit on my desk waiting for the day when I can rationalize a Knotsmith lanyard.  

It is gratifying that you found the bands.  I know about losing things through holes worn in pockets etc.  I also regret that your lanyard broke. While I don't  remember having a lanyard braid break,  I have lost a whistle that snagged and pulled its split ring apart.  I have had customers send me the type bands that need to be installed when a lanyard is being made.  I can understand their trophy and memoir value.  Unfortunately, I don't have any bands of my own.  If I may, perhaps I can help you "rationalize"  a lanyard.

Larry

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