Jump to content
REGISTERING FOR MEMBERSHIP ON UPLAND JOURNAL Read more... ×
Sign in to follow this  
rawhide

What do you carry on your lanyard?

Recommended Posts

Rick Hall
22 hours ago, rawhide said:

...(other than the obvious whistle or whistles)? 

 

That nearly leaves me out, as my decoy cord upland and EDC lanyard has nothing other than three whistles on it: a quiet Acme 212, a LOUD Fox 40 Sonic Blast and a Montana Lite herding dog whistle that probably qualifies as "other than the obvious whistle".  Particularly since its purpose is to mimic and perhaps toll any fulvous or black-bellied whistling ducks we might run into on our rounds - just because it tickles me to do so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
terrym

A whistle and a truck key. Transmitter clipped onto my left side of vest. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cooter Brown

If everybody put as much thought and sound reasoning into their work as you do I'd like things a lot better.  The insight about having it stiff enough not to flop is terrific, and making it so that it can be easily used as a lead is something I would opt for if I ever get one of those beauties.

 

Mine is a Mendota, I think.  I forget where I got the thing.  I've had it probably 15 years.  A lot of miles.  Along with the counters it came with a cheap plastic compass but that broke in a hurry.  I'd probably carry a Tru-Nord compass on it if I ran across one--as it is I use a plastic ping pong ball pin-on on a vest strap.  A truck key makes sense but these days they all seem to be those big fat things with chips in them.

 

When I got it I thought the leather thing was to adjust the length of the lanyard--in other words where the whistle lands on the chest.  I admit I'm really not very smart.  So I tried that and the two clip ends flopped around too much even though they are both attached to the whistle, especially after the compass broke.  Both legs went through it and it tied things together sort of the way the decoy cord whipping does now.  The whole thing was just too loose and open.  That's why I put the decoy cord on there, like whipping the end of a rope.  It made the thing more rigid.  But it still flops around too much and I stuff the business end into my shirt between two buttons.  Shortly after I whipped the decoy cord on it I realized that the leather thing was bothersome on the back of the neck.  It made a loop that stuck up and hit the brim in the rear of my hat.  So now it rides down on the lanyard and the decoy cord is likely not needed any more but I left it on there.

 

lanyard.jpg.51e42d750bd16287f96fd9a53195a351.jpg

 

I know you're thinking, "Damn, look at the quality and precision and creativity of that work with the decoy cord!  This guy's gonna set up shop and come after my business!"  But don't worry--I tried to braid once and ended up getting stuck like chinese handcuffs and anyway marsupials freak me out a little bit.

 

Edit--I forgot to add the pic!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

So. On the subject of what you could incorporate into your designs... Or a tangent of it...

 

First off, although technically out of my personal budget, I've been fascinated with, and admired your designs for years. Probably in part because I'm fascinated by knotwork, and do some myself. There's nothing I don't want to try to make. But they are quite elaborate and "fancy".

 

Have you ever thought about a "simpler" design? They are beautiful, but... I think something less elaborate and refined (not necessarily cheaper, unless it was just way easier) could interest people who are on the edge.

 

See my previous comment about technically out of my budget. Something that's perfect is worth three times what something that's almost perfect is worth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rawhide

Well, yes, I started out making much simpler lanyards (in several senses), the Type 1 Lanyards, a.k.a, T1.  The were 4X round braid of 1/8" lace and had slides of horn, antler, bone, wood (typically mesquite burl knots).  See the picture below.  In this case the slide is red cedar.  Note that the swivels were attached by back braiding.  Braiding and knotting (as you undoubtedly know) can be learned in Bruce Grant's books.  I move on from this type of lanyard to one that used a 6 or 8 strand braid with a nylon twine or cord core.   I used braided knots for the slide and attachments.  That was and is the T2 lanyard as shown in the second picture.  And driven by customer requests and demands, I moved on from that to T2 lanyards with all kinds of options and accessories evident on the web pages. However, I occasionally get orders for and make basic T2 lanyards with no accessories.  The price is currently $260, about the same as four flats of shotgun shells.  Well cared for, a T2 lanyard will last for a couple of decades or more.  That's about $13/yr.

 

The business reality is that I can only make so many lanyards per year. If the demand is there, and it is, It makes business sense to make only top-of-the line T2 (or other) lanyards with all the options and accessories requested by customers who want and are willing to pay for those items as opposed to marketing and making very simple (basic) lanyards.  That application of time and resources is analogous to the concept of "highest and best use" of real estate.  

 

Now, if I were a willing entrepreneur, I could take my "simple" lanyard designs and have the lanyards made in one of several foreign countries and sell them through catalogs. The catalog companies would make most of the profit off of that and would quickly  go around me, have the lanyards made directly for their brand, and leave me with nothing.  I have turned down numerous offers to play that game.  And there are catalog companies offering "hand made" leather lanyards that look like copies of my "simple design."

 

After I had been making custom braided lanyards for about 15 years, after the reviews in SSM and SC had put me into orbit and my primary customer group had become grouse and woodcock hunters who wanted brass counters, compasses, and whistles, etc., I encountered an old bird hunter at a Park Cities Quail function.  He seemed familiar, so I innocently asked that, if I remembered correctly,  hadn't I made a lanyard for him back in the 90's.  He said that I had and added with a big grin, "Thank God, I bought one before you became famous!"   That left me speechless for a bit, but then I said that, somehow, it was more fun before I became famous too.  And that is about as close as I can come to speaking to the question you posed.  If you have a suggestion as how to get out of the paradox, I would like to hear it.

 

Thanks, and I wish you well.  

 

T1J.jpg.cd8bd777275e94b2358a9cc28add418b.jpgT2Heisz.jpg.c44e0290cec5d42aedb164c78ece4d02.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

I follow and understand that. 

 

To respond to the end first, getting out of the paradox is the part I don't know. 

 

I'll give you the short version of the long story that prompted my thought... I do high end custom trim/woodworking. Think This Old House, only I complain more. 

 

I have as a hobby always done odd stuff with old wood and materials. If you search "upcycling" that's how I started. Using old stuff because I had more ideas than money. 

 

I want to somehow persue the smaller stuff more, as I now have a shop. It's fun for me and very satisfying. But I've cultivated a name and reputation as doing an excellent job with what is currently paying the bills. Customers adore my griping, and the bird dog that comes to work when it's not too hot. 

 

But how do I do the other stuff, in a profitable way (like your simpler designs, to most people it's much easier, but in terms of my effort, it's really only marginally simpler at best, and in some cases more or even much more work) without undoing the name I've worked hard to build. 

 

 

Some of the stuff I do (copper bracelets from old wire) people have encouraged me to replicate in a mass production form. But they wouldn't be the same. Some stuff is just a labor of love and a piece of art. To make it cheaper and more available cheapens it and makes it something that's worth a fourth of the price of what it was, but would have to sell for half of what it did cost to be profitable on paper, yet still destroy the original product. 

 

That's for the little bit of history as well! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rawhide
2 hours ago, Cooter Brown said:

 

"I know you're thinking, "Damn, look at the quality and precision and creativity of that work with the decoy cord!  This guy's gonna set up shop and come after my business!"  But don't worry--I tried to braid once and ended up getting stuck like chinese handcuffs and anyway marsupials freak me out a little bit."

 

 

Well, as a matter of fact, your whipping is better looking than that I cover with braided knots.  To improve the "floppy" in the nylon on your lanyard you might experiment with wipe on or spray on polyurethane.  A rancher told me that nylon lariats used for roping are stiffened that way.  You probably could check that out if you happen to know any ropers.  Sounds reasonable but I never tried it.  If it works you could make a fortune making nylon cord lanyards "with body'.

 

The main thing is that your lanyard works.  That reminds me of an old oilfield quip:  "I'd a whole lot ruther have one that works than one that just looks good!"  I strive to provide lanyards that work and look good, but I also make lanyards to customer specifications.  Sometimes it is apparent that the looking good part is more important than the working part.

 

For an absurd example, a customer called and said he wanted to order the lanyard in the ad (naturally the one in the ad is always "fully tricked out").  I asked about length so it would fit, the compass compensation, etc., all the usual questions necessary to personalize a custom-braided lanyard.  He said just make it like the one in the picture.  I insisted his lanyard needed to fit if it was going to wear and work optimally.  He got agitated and said that he was not going to use it; rather, he was going to hang it in his gun cabinet for guests to admire.  I got agitated and said that I had not included that "object of art" aspect in my pricing.  He firmly said  that I should do so and make the lanyard in the picture ASAP.  And I did, but the extra money did not make me feel good about it.  

 

Thanks and keep on keeping on!

Larry

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
4 minutes ago, rawhide said:

 And I did, but the extra money did not make me feel good about it.  

 

 

Larry

 

One of the truest statements I've ever heard. 

 

Also, that really makes me want one now! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rawhide
4 minutes ago, NECarson said:

I follow and understand that. 

 

To respond to the end first, getting out of the paradox is the part I don't know. 

 

I'll give you the short version of the long story that prompted my thought... I do high end custom trim/woodworking. Think This Old House, only I complain more. 

 

I have as a hobby always done odd stuff with old wood and materials. If you search "upcycling" that's how I started. Using old stuff because I had more ideas than money. 

 

I want to somehow persue the smaller stuff more, as I now have a shop. It's fun for me and very satisfying. But I've cultivated a name and reputation as doing an excellent job with what is currently paying the bills. Customers adore my griping, and the bird dog that comes to work when it's not too hot. 

 

But how do I do the other stuff, in a profitable way (like your simpler designs, to most people it's much easier, but in terms of my effort, it's really only marginally simpler at best, and in some cases more or even much more work) without undoing the name I've worked hard to build. 

 

 

Some of the stuff I do (copper bracelets from old wire) people have encouraged me to replicate in a mass production form. But they wouldn't be the same. Some stuff is just a labor of love and a piece of art. To make it cheaper and more available cheapens it and makes it something that's worth a fourth of the price of what it was, but would have to sell for half of what it did cost to be profitable on paper, yet still destroy the original product. 

 

That's for the little bit of history as well! 

Holy Smoke!  That is about as parallel and one could get!    The only suggestion I can make is to get a web page and sell your "custom", simple pieces directly to the customer as I did.  Also, there are numerous small items that I have made and make but don't put on the web page, because I could not address the extra orders for braided bracelets, key ring fobs, necklaces, etc. that I have made for friends, etc.  At least officially I stick to the main script.  Maybe someday soon, I will quit making custom braided lanyards and make stuff that I want to make and sell each piece on the web page.

Thanks, and I wish you well.  We should talk about this more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rawhide
3 hours ago, terrym said:

A whistle and a truck key. Transmitter clipped onto my left side of vest. 

 

Is your transmitter on your lanyard?  I have made several lanyards for customers who wanted to attach various transmitters to lanyards.  Given the weight, the transmitter will "bottom out" so the first choice would seem to be a T2FL, a fixed-loop lanyard with one drop, but if the drop is long enough to allow appropriate/convenient uses of the transmitter, it will typically hang far too low, swing about and generally be nuisance.  So, the transmitter can be clipped as on your vest or put into a pocket with the lanyard providing a fail safe against loss.  And if one is going to clip or pocket the transmitter, the lanyard can be a T2 with the transmitter on one leg and a whistle on the other.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rawhide
3 hours ago, Rick Hall said:

 

That nearly leaves me out, as my decoy cord upland and EDC lanyard has nothing other than three whistles on it: a quiet Acme 212, a LOUD Fox 40 Sonic Blast and a Montana Lite herding dog whistle that probably qualifies as "other than the obvious whistle".  Particularly since its purpose is to mimic and perhaps toll any fulvous or black-bellied whistling ducks we might run into on our rounds - just because it tickles me to do so.

 

That is an interesting (and probably unique) set of whistles you have on your lanyard.  I have used both Acme 212 and Fox40 whistles, and I have at one time or another provided both to customers.  But the Montana Lite herding dog whistle is a new one to me.

 

Back in the mid-90s I made quite a few T2FL lanyards for the border collie folk.  Somewhere in my "stuff" I have a titanium herding dog whistle given to me by a customer with the challenge that I should learn to use it and put a "whistle" or "whistle set" (can't remember the terminology) on my Brits analogous to the way they did on the border collies. The whistle came with a brochure showing the "set".  I tried but was never able to master the whistle.  I worked on it while I braided.  After several sessions of that my wife said that I should cease and desist in as much as it had gotten on her last nerve---even worse than the racket I had made learning to use a diaphragm turkey yelper.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
terrym
5 hours ago, rawhide said:

 

Is your transmitter on your lanyard?  I have made several lanyards for customers who wanted to attach various transmitters to lanyards.  Given the weight, the transmitter will "bottom out" so the first choice would seem to be a T2FL, a fixed-loop lanyard with one drop, but if the drop is long enough to allow appropriate/convenient uses of the transmitter, it will typically hang far too low, swing about and generally be nuisance.  So, the transmitter can be clipped as on your vest or put into a pocket with the lanyard providing a fail safe against loss.  And if one is going to clip or pocket the transmitter, the lanyard can be a T2 with the transmitter on one leg and a whistle on the other.

 

Nope. Transmitter is clipped onto the vest with the Dogtra lanyard attached to the vest directly. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rick Hall
5 hours ago, rawhide said:

Back in the mid-90s I made quite a few T2FL lanyards for the border collie folk.  Somewhere in my "stuff" I have a titanium herding dog whistle given to me by a customer with the challenge that I should learn to use it and put a "whistle" or "whistle set" (can't remember the terminology) on my Brits analogous to the way they did on the border collies. The whistle came with a brochure showing the "set".  I tried but was never able to master the whistle.  I worked on it while I braided.  After several sessions of that my wife said that I should cease and desist in as much as it had gotten on her last nerve---even worse than the racket I had made learning to use a diaphragm turkey yelper.  

 

Likely because it's something I keep handy to fool with when we're afield and the birds it mimics so well are around, I can run the pee out of a decent herding whistle, but I don't find it nearly so handy as regular whistles for my pretty basic dog control needs or as reaching, when need be, as the Sonic Blast.  My dogs appear to ignore my frequent practice sessions and take it as the same "heads-up" in the blind as other calls, but I'd not be surprised to learn they admire it as much as your wife did.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rawhide

I have thought of making a lanyard accessory to carry a cell phone on a lanyard using various commercially available cell phone holsters.  Any experience with carrying a cell phone on a lanyard?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DonT

I have nothing relevant to add to the original question.  As I only wear 2 whistles a Acme 210.5 and a Acme thunder, occasionally a compass.  But I do admire your work and one day I will own one of your Lanyards.  While I thought of these as a work of art I did not realize the functionality and thought you put into your work, and now want one even more.  I think a T2FL with a flush counter and a brass whistle would work nicely.  Honestly my eyes glaze over looking at all the options and navigating about.  But I guess you talk this caliber of clientele though the options.  Looks like I will purchase a Garmin Alpha this fall, so I may have to wait to next year.  Or maybe a milestone like getting my young Mutt to pass a NAVHDA UT Test will prove that I am worthy of one of your Lanyards. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×