Jump to content
REGISTERING FOR MEMBERSHIP ON UPLAND JOURNAL Read more... ×
Sign in to follow this  
rawhide

What do you carry on your lanyard?

Recommended Posts

rawhide

First, I freely admit that the current web page is a maze, I apologize for that, and yes, most folk just call up and say, "Here's what I want to carry, and I like (this or that) picture on the web page."  From that we work through personalizing a lanyard to fit, carry what they need to carry, and look the way they want it to look.  A T2FL with one counter and a whistle is a very popular configuration; and it is also a good place to start, since other things can be added using hitch loops on the cheeks, e.g., call loops or a compass, etc.  Call and let's discuss that.  I figure we can work out a scheme to get you the lanyard you want.

 

And regarding the web page, there is new web page coming in a month or two.  It will be professional, sparse, easy to navigate, user friendly, and mobile device friendly (so I am told) whereas the current one is NOT.  It will have a completely different look and very little of the homespun "character" of the current web page. That was left over from the  '90s when the market was a bit different.  For example the FAQ page, if there is one, will be nothing like the current one, no humorous stories, no references to customers, etc.  I am told that style is passé, lacks appropriate dignity, and detracts from my "high-class", "artful" lanyards. Impersonal, just the facts, all business.  Maybe so, but somewhere in there the same curmudgeon, albeit slower and a bit mellower, still makes each lanyard specifically for a customer, is still trying to improve the lanyard, and still strives to make each one so it fits, works well, looks great, and lasts a long time.  I fear the new web page will not get that message across as well as the old one does. 

 

But, hey, I am paying these folk the equivalent of a half dozen or more lanyard orders to redesign and rebuild the web page "according to current professional standards appropriate for today's technology and online market place," so I listen to them.  They don't tell me how to make lanyards, and I don't tell them how to design web pages! 

 

Anyway, I fully expect customers to call up and say, "Here's what I want to carry, and I like (this or that) picture on the (new) web page."  And, just as we have done for about 25 years, we will proceed from there.   So, it's all good. 

 

But just for a smile or two, you could check out the old FAQ page before it passes into history.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
1 hour ago, rawhide said:

First, I freely admit that the current web page is a maze, I apologize for that, and yes, most folk just call up and say, "Here's what I want to carry, and I like (this or that) picture on the web page."  From that we work through personalizing a lanyard to fit, carry what they need to carry, and look the way they want it to look.  A T2FL with one counter and a whistle is a very popular configuration; and it is also a good place to start, since other things can be added using hitch loops on the cheeks, e.g., call loops or a compass, etc.  Call and let's discuss that.  I figure we can work out a scheme to get you the lanyard you want.

 

And regarding the web page, there is new web page coming in a month or two.  It will be professional, sparse, easy to navigate, user friendly, and mobile device friendly (so I am told) whereas the current one is NOT.  It will have a completely different look and very little of the homespun "character" of the current web page. That was left over from the  '90s when the market was a bit different.  For example the FAQ page, if there is one, will be nothing like the current one, no humorous stories, no references to customers, etc.  I am told that style is passé, lacks appropriate dignity, and detracts from my "high-class", "artful" lanyards. Impersonal, just the facts, all business.  Maybe so, but somewhere in there the same curmudgeon, albeit slower and a bit mellower, still makes each lanyard specifically for a customer, is still trying to improve the lanyard, and still strives to make each one so it fits, works well, looks great, and lasts a long time.  I fear the new web page will not get that message across as well as the old one does. 

 

But, hey, I am paying these folk the equivalent of a half dozen or more lanyard orders to redesign and rebuild the web page "according to current professional standards appropriate for today's technology and online market place," so I listen to them.  They don't tell me how to make lanyards, and I don't tell them how to design web pages! 

 

Anyway, I fully expect customers to call up and say, "Here's what I want to carry, and I like (this or that) picture on the (new) web page."  And, just as we have done for about 25 years, we will proceed from there.   So, it's all good. 

 

But just for a smile or two, you could check out the old FAQ page before it passes into history.

 

As someone who does most of their "interneting" on a tablet, mobile friendly is huge! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rawhide

Tablet.  I don't have one but have seen them.  The word reminds me of a conversation at a bird hunting club meeting in the '80s, in the early days of PCs.  There was some writing or reporting to be done, and a younger member asked my friend what word processor he was going to use.   With a straight face my friend replied, "A Big Chief tablet and a No. 2 pencil."   We have come a long way, but some have always been behind the curve (on purpose).  I got the web page when domain names were new, and I built most of the web page on a word processor (not on a tablet) using html code.  I later used FrontPage, but I did not keep up with changing software.  When I ran ads in those early days, it was very common to get frequent phone calls requesting a brochure or catalog with the explanation, "I don't have a computer."  That still happens, but it is quite rare, a couple of times a year.  

 

I do have a "smart phone", and when I try to show someone a lanyard on my web page using my "smart phone",  I fully appreciate how completely "mobile unfriendly" my web page is.  So.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
7 minutes ago, rawhide said:

Tablet.  I don't have one but have seen them.  The word reminds me of a conversation at a bird hunting club meeting in the '80s, in the early days of PCs.  There was some writing or reporting to be done, and a younger member asked my friend what word processor he was going to use.   With a straight face my friend replied, "A Big Chief tablet and a No. 2 pencil."   We have come a long way, but some have always been behind the curve (on purpose).  I got the web page when domain names were new, and I built most of the web page on a word processor (not on a tablet) using html code.  I later used FrontPage, but I did not keep up with changing software.  When I ran ads in those early days, it was very common to get frequent phone calls requesting a brochure or catalog with the explanation, "I don't have a computer."  That still happens, but it is quite rare, a couple of times a year.  

 

I do have a "smart phone", and when I try to show someone a lanyard on my web page using my "smart phone",  I fully appreciate how completely "mobile unfriendly" my web page is.  So.

 

I like that story!

 

I'm young enough to have always had a computer in my home, but old enough to remember most of my friends not having one.

 

In some ways I hate technology, but if I can see how it makes my life easier, I'm a huge fan of it! The tablet definitely makes a good bit of stuff easier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rawhide

I carried the small steel below on a lanyard for several decades starting in late 60s.  It was and is fantastic for keeping a razor edge on knives and broad heads in the field.   Note that it is marked "F. Dick" on the side shown and "Germany" on the back side.  While full-sized F. Dick steels are still available for large knives (chef knives, etc.), a search did not indicate that the size shown is currently offered.  Has anyone else had (or have) or used one of these or know of any source of them?

 

 

Steel F Dick.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
blanked

I never put any more thought in my lanyard as I do my shoe strings.  Must be a regional thing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rawhide

Yep.  It is definitely a "regional thing".  However, at least in the case of my KNOTSMITH lanyards, that "region" is not geographical since I have customers in all geographical regions of the US, including the Coastal Plain of Texas, and in many foreign lands as well.  One reviewer described one aspect of the "regional thing" as "aesthetic functionality."  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

The steel is really cool! 

 

Lanyards are one of those things that can function well as something very simple, or can be a functional work of art. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rawhide

The first lanyard I carried that  steel on was quite simple, just four strands of nylon twine plaited into a thong with a carved wooden slide and fishing swivels on the tips.  I carried a truck key on the leg with the steel, and a nickel plated Acme whistle on the other leg.  Years later when the nylon looked really dirty,  I put the slide on a four strand braid of goat skin and transferred the steel too.  I retired the nickel plated whistle for a plastic one.  That lanyard was the origin of the lanyards that a decade later I took to field trials to sell. This first type of lanyard was later called a T1, and there is a picture of a T1 on a previous page in this thread.  Eventually, by popular demand, the wooden (and anther and horn) slides gave way to braided knot slides. 

 

I have donated a T1 lanyard with a braided knot slide to the upcoming auction.    I made it just for fun, to remember and enjoy making the braid of four strands of leather lace, tying the simple braided knot slide, and  back- braiding the attachment of the swivels and scissor snaps, and as  tribute to my "roots".  It's a simple lanyard, it will work, and it looks good.  I doubt it would be considered  a work of art as well as being functional, but I enjoyed making it between orders for T2 lanyards that might be.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
braque du upstate

I recently added a adrelene finisher to my lanyard. Brass , about the size of a quarter.  it's been really handy for waterfowl. I don't know if I absolutely need it for UPLAND. it weighs almost nothing,  and I find it very effective.  waterfowl, I won't be without one.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Don Steese

If I end up being the high bidder I'll soon own a fine Knotsmith lanyard. Will hang a 40's vintage Boy Scouts of America whistle and I'm not sure what else, but I've always been intrigued by a flush counter. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rawhide

Don,

I wish you well on the bidding. 

 

That T1 was made one day when I was feeling nostalgic about the beginning of all this.  I had not made a T1 lanyard for about 20 years (i.e., a 4X lanyard of 1/8" lace).  I added the long cylindrical slide knot, a triple 4X9 herringbone knot, to connect it to the present (I did not know that knot in the beginning. I kept things very simple!), and that slide  knot makes it a unique T1.  But that T1 does not come with a flush counter (obviously since none was pictured), but if you are the high bidder and want a counter, contact me.  We will discuss putting a counter on your lanyard via a hitch loop attachment.  I might even have some of that 1/8" natural kangaroo lace left that  I used to make that T1 so it would have a consistent look.  Thanks again for helping me help UJ and Brad by participating in the auction!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×