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Don't forget muzzle loaders until Dec 2nd!

 

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I just got back from Montana.  I was supposed to be on my annual elk hunt but the weather really didn't cooperate with lots of cold and snow.  I shifted to deer hunting a couple of evenings and was re

Yup, yes, indeed...shot this buck at around 5:45PM with the bow. No time for a load of posed photos since I was alone and darkness was descending. Had to field dress and start dragging. My best bow bu

Couple more shots. Nobody around to take a hero shot. Jo Ann is out of town and Cash hasn't figured out my iPhone camera, yet.    

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1 hour ago, MAArcher said:

Don't forget muzzle loaders until Dec 2nd!

 

 

Statewide MZ ends December 2nd. But, quite a few WMD's end for MZ on December 9th.

 

Also the Expanded Archery season ends on December 9th. I have filled both my Expanded bow buck tag and my firearms tag, so I can't hunt with a rifle or muzzleloader. But I did buy another Expanded Bow Doe tag after arrowing the first Doe, so can still hunt with bow there for Doe. Plus my wife JoAnn will deer hunt, but doesn't love it like she does Turkey hunting and some Upland, and she also drew a firearm Doe tag. I feel guilty even thinking about taking another deer, or taking JoAnn out. But the meat goes quick...just dropped the heart and liver and a box of meat to an old timer friend who can no longer hunt. And I have others lining up, like the breeder of my Springers who will get some meat, and my buddy Scott if he doesn't score himself. Tomorrow is butchering and packaging day here for the Spike.

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IMG_0546.JPG

 

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skinned...

 

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quartered...

 

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cut...and ready for vac/bag sealer and grinder.

 

Inner loins, backstraps, rear quarter steaks, front quarter steak and burger chunks,  two rear quarter roasts, rear quarter stew meat, front quarter stew meat and trimmings for burger. All vac sealed, except for burger meat which I will grind tomorrow. About 4.5 hours from skinning to sealing, for one guy before burger grind. I need a beer or two or...

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Michael Stenstrom

Nice job on the butchering.  It is a rewarding process!  A great time at camp.  I love time in remote places with life distilled to time  spent exploring woods with no other boot tracks,  meals cooked on a wood stove, and long discussions by the glow of oil lamps.

 

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On 11/13/2017 at 5:10 AM, Brad Eden said:

That's the taj mahal Don, very nice, compared to my trappers cabin built by my great grandfather and great Uncle in early 40's. Rustic doesn't adequately describe my hovel. But it brings a person back in time to a simpler place.

 

 

It's still an off the grid cabin with no running water or electricity. Propane for heating, cooling, and cooking. I miss the fireplace more than anything!! 

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Love that smell of deer meat hanging in the air of the kitchen.

 

Killed a little black powder buck on my first outing this season on Nov 4. Sat in the rain for 4 hrs, and had enough. On the way out to the truck, I peaked in the field corners and sure enough, there he was just standing in the field like a dummy. About a 60 yd shot, and a 50 yd tracking job.

 

Small 6 pt trying hard to be a 7 pt. Dressed I would estimate about 100 lbs. Bad thing was that big-assed muzzleloader bullet ruined a fair amount of rib and flank meat on both sides. But, we got a few backstrap roasts and about 19.5 lbs of ground burger.

 

 

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Edited by NCgrouse
testing out my new picture adding function.
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Life's a grind...

 

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Two grinds, course and then finer with some fatback thrown in that Mike Stenstrom gave me. 1 pound portions vac bagged. What grinding I use t do was with a hand grinder. This electric grinder is simply awesome.

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55 minutes ago, Brad Eden said:

Life's a grind...

 

IMG_0547.JPG

 

Two grinds, course and then finer with some fatback thrown in that Mike Stenstrom gave me. 1 pound portions vac bagged. What grinding I use t do was with a hand grinder. This electric grinder is simply awesome.

 

I ground venison with a hand grinder exactly once, my first time. Between my inexperience and the inefficiency of the grinder it was a disaster. I set out a whole tub of burger cuts and started grinding. At first it didn't go to bad but soon the stuff was barely going through and I was sweating my arse off. I didn't know you can't let the meat warm up. It came out slowly and the consistency of baby poop. The brats didn't taste much better. After that I bought a cheap ($60) Black Friday electric grinder and cool the cuts to almost frozen. I only take out what I can grind in a few minutes and boy does it go fast. 

 

For mixing in some fat I go to the Amish butcher and get rough ground pork for only $15 a 10lb tube. I grind it again and mix it 1:2 parts venison, add seasoning and package bulk for sausage or press into brats. I've been using sweet Italian or hot Italian, but on my buck I tried a small amount of a new seasoning from the Amish called County Breakfast. Yum. The burger cuts from my sons buck will end up as burger and Country Breakfast sausage. 

 

For mixing ground pork, venison, and seasoning, a kitchen aid mixer with beater blade works great. You can mix up 3 lb ( one pork two venison) batches is a couple minutes. I'm sure glad I didn't spend more money on a meat mixer when my wife had one sitting on the counter. 

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A pic of the results of above process, where most of the burger cuts from my son's buck from last week ended up. I spent half a day Friday processing and all day Saturday. The fun definitely is over when you find your deer. But it begins over and over again when you start eating these. 

 

Edit: do not attempt this with man made casings, they are crap, IMO.  Use natural casings. 

image.jpeg

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  • 2 weeks later...

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He lives. I'm pretty sure this was the "4 pt" I messed up on over a month ago, described earlier in this thread. I never really looked closely at his rack at the time. This is from my Expanded spot where I shot the Doe and 8 pt. I had tried to lean left and slip an arrow behind the shoulder due to a tree blocking part of his body as he stared up at me. The arrow hit the bone on shoulder and didn't penetrate much at all. That white spot is exactly where I saw arrow/broadhead hit. I still have a doe tag to burn in Expanded zone but haven't been back, due to fighting the flu and pulling muscles in my neck and right shoulder moving logs left over from that wind storm we had. Sucks getting old. I have a load of venison so aren't as anxious to shoot another. But hope to feel well enough to sit in bow stand at least twice next week. Expanded bow Season ends Saturday the 9th.

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Birdcountry70

It's a good feeling to know that a hit and lost archery deer recovered. I once shot a doe and the arrow passed below the spine but apparently above the lungs. I watched her drop into a gully about 80 yards away and gave her an hour then walked over to get her and couldnt believe my eyes when she jumped up and ran off with blood running down both sides. I tried to relocate her a few hours later but lost the blood trail.  I felt sick.  A few days later when I was feeding cows I saw her from the tractor feeding with some other deer. She looked stiff and sore but the marks from the arrow were plain to see. I saw her a couple more times until I could no longer pick her out. Since then I've read about others who have shot deer through the"undead zone" and had them survive. 

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It's amazing the injuries that some deer can live with. A number of years ago, I spent half dozen seasons working in the butcher shop of one of my friends' fathers. I lost track of the number of times while cutting up a deer that I encountered broadheads, arrow shafts, bullets, slugs and birdshot. The majority of times the object was encased in a cyst or sac. Typically, the deer appeared healthy and the muscle tissue surrounding the cyst was normal. The instance that stands out the most was when my buddy was ripping down the rib cage of a deer lengthwise through the backbone. We heard a sound that was a bit out of the norm for bone. He stopped the saw and we looked to see what produced the noise. There was an aluminum arrow shaft embedded in the spinal column! This was during our rifle season and no signs of any injury were present other than the shaft itself.  

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5 hours ago, Marc Ret said:

It's amazing the injuries that some deer can live with. A number of years ago, I spent half dozen seasons working in the butcher shop of one of my friends' fathers. I lost track of the number of times while cutting up a deer that I encountered broadheads, arrow shafts, bullets, slugs and birdshot. The majority of times the object was encased in a cyst or sac. Typically, the deer appeared healthy and the muscle tissue surrounding the cyst was normal. The instance that stands out the most was when my buddy was ripping down the rib cage of a deer lengthwise through the backbone. We heard a sound that was a bit out of the norm for bone. He stopped the saw and we looked to see what produced the noise. There was an aluminum arrow shaft embedded in the spinal column! This was during our rifle season and no signs of any injury were present other than the shaft itself.  

Growing up I heard of a legendary old buck who was killed “out in the bog” that I hunted and the rumor was that he had a broadhead and a round ball in him, along with the 30-30 bullet that finally killed him. Deer are tuff critters no doubt.   

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IMG_0554.JPG

 

Got tired of cutting up deer on a hunk of  plywood on top of sawhorses...built a new work/butchering bench for walk-in basement. Now I probably won't kill another deer for the rest of my life. Jinx.

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1 hour ago, Brad Eden said:

IMG_0554.JPG

 

Got tired of cutting up deer on a hunk of  plywood on top of sawhorses...built a new work/butchering bench for walk-in basement. Now I probably won't kill another deer for the rest of my life. Jinx.

 

Looks like a solid platform to work on. Do you plan to use some type of cutting surface over the OSB? 

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