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All time favorite movie - pick one


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1 hour ago, Big Al said:

Three of my favorites in the baseball genre are:

The Natural

Field of Dreams

Eight Men Out

Al, with ya, all really good ones especially Eight Men Out.  For sports movies, I keep coming back to Hoosiers.  Everything about that movie is so nicely done.  No dramatic "over acting". Straight up captures a very cool tiny piece of time.  BTW, if anyone get's a chance, read The Natural.  It's bit different than the movie especially at the end.

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In the name of all sports related movies, there is but one to behold! Its name is "Slapshot".

 

All bow in supplication!

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37 minutes ago, jeff88 said:

Al, with ya, all really good ones especially Eight Men Out.  For sports movies, I keep coming back to Hoosiers.  Everything about that movie is so nicely done.  No dramatic "over acting". Straight up captures a very cool tiny piece of time.  BTW, if anyone get's a chance, read The Natural.  It's bit different than the movie especially at the end.

Hoosiers is a great one.  Gene Hackman is one of my favorite actors.

I did read The Natural before I saw the movie.  Been so long I can't remember the difference between the two. I do remember that there was something though.

The one book that everybody should read but nobody did is Forest Gump.  I read it before I saw the movie also.  The book was a light hearted comedy that caused me to LOL several times.  The book was fun.  The movie too serious.  I couldn't enjoy it.  Arnold would have been the perfect Forest. 

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6 minutes ago, Ben Hong said:

In the name of all sports related movies, there is but one to behold! Its name is "Slapshot".

 

All bow in supplication!

 

In a class of it's own.

 

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I have a real soft spot in my heart for 'The Great Outdoors'.  It's not a cinematic masterpiece, but I have watched it several hundred times.  When my friend and I purchased hunting land before our boys were born  it came with an old dingy 1960's trailer home on it.  The trailer was mostly gutted with cobbled together 2x4 bunks with chunks of foam for mattresses.  It must have been a real 'deer shack' during it's day because it came with a good supply of adult magazines, playing cards, and half empty booze bottles.  Due to location there is no over the air t.v. available and very limited cell phone coverage (a bonus).  There was an old tv and 80''s vintage VCR.  One of the only tapes was 'The Great Outdoors' and we would put in on like some people might a favorite old record.  It was just background noise as we puttered around frying fish, drinking whisky and plotting our next days adventure.  After the boys were born 'The Great Outdoors' was the only movie up there that was even in the realm of kid friendly (don't even get me started on the time we caught them playing 'go fish' with nude playing cards).  They would watch that movie in rapt attention back to back to back if we would let them.  They played their hearts out all day outside, and when we started cooking dinner on came, 'The Great Outdoors'.  It got to be they all had it memorized right down to the voice inflection by the actors.  We had to explain to them that their mothers might not let them come back up to the shack if they kept telling other kids what hot dogs are made of ('Lips and assholes' according to Uncle Roman in the movie).  The old shack was razed and built anew and we wore through the original VHS copy.  The new shack has a DVD player and I can still convince them to watch 'Great Outdoors' with me once in a while though they can't understand why I like the movie so much.  Last deer season we had to break it out to please 'The Shack Gods' in hopes of changing our luck the next day.  

 

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Kansas Big Dog

The Misfits

 

The Misfits is a 1961 American drama film written by Arthur Miller, directed byJohn Huston, and starring Clark Gable, Marilyn Monroe and Montgomery Clift. The supporting cast features Thelma Ritter, Eli Wallach and Kevin McCarthy. It marked the last completed film of Gable and Monroe. For Gable, the film was posthumously released, while Monroe died the following year. The plot centers on a recently divorced woman (Monroe) and her time spent with acowboy (Gable), his tow truck-driving friend (Wallach) and his rodeo-riding friend (Clift) in the Western Nevada desert in the 1960s. The film was a commercial failure at the time of its release, but received positive critical comments for its script and performances, and is highly regarded today.

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19 hours ago, Hub said:

I have a real soft spot in my heart for 'The Great Outdoors'.    

 

 

Here's a review of the movie.  Apparently you didn't have this experience.:)

 

"Imagine that it's raining cats and dogs and you're locked in a north woods cabin for weeks with the people you like least, and you'll pretty much have a feel for what it's like to sit through this movie," said Hal Hinson of The Washington Post.[5]

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4 hours ago, Big Al said:

 

Here's a review of the movie.  Apparently you didn't have this experience.:)

 

"Imagine that it's raining cats and dogs and you're locked in a north woods cabin for weeks with the people you like least, and you'll pretty much have a feel for what it's like to sit through this movie," said Hal Hinson of The Washington Post.[5]

I was a child of the 80' s and grew up in the midwest.  I can pretty much recite verbatim anything John Hughes ever wrote:

 

The Breakfast Club

Weird Science

Planes Trains and Automobiles

Uncle Buck

Vacation

Christmas Vacation

European Vactation

Home Alone

 

John Hughes was a guy who wrote movies about what it was like to be a midwestern kid at a time that I was a midwestern kid.  Hal Hinson can pound sand.  :) 

 

 

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Coming soon to a tv near you:  "Where Iggles Dare!", the story of the Philadelphia Davids versus the New England Goliaths.  

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I'm still waiting for it to be made. There was a TV mini series done but while it was a respectable effort, it did not do real justice to the greatest adventure novel ever written.

By that I mean James Clavell's novel "Shogun." Taipan has been done, King Rat, Ditto but Clavell's best work? Sorry! Doubt me? Think I'm kidding? Give it a good read.

Sex, love, betrayal, intrigue, Samurai, Ninja, faith, duty, war. It's all there woven into a intricate  literary tapestry set in an age of discovery and the early days of the peak of Japan's Samurai culture. First chapter sets the tales rough picture from there on it takes off and continues on fast pace with twists and turns right to the end.

 

 

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Los of great picks.  I have seen most of them multiple times. 

 

I can't believe no one picked my all time favorite yet...so I will.

 

The Mel Brooks classic :  SPACEBALLS.    It just never gets old for me.

 

RayG

 

 

Edited by Ray Gubernat
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7 hours ago, Spin said:

I'm still waiting for it to be made. There was a TV mini series done but while it was a respectable effort, it did not do real justice to the greatest adventure novel ever written.

By that I mean James Clavell's novel "Shogun." Taipan has been done, King Rat, Ditto but Clavell's best work? Sorry! Doubt me? Think I'm kidding? Give it a good read.

Sex, love, betrayal, intrigue, Samurai, Ninja, faith, duty, war. It's all there woven into a intricate  literary tapestry set in an age of discovery and the early days of the peak of Japan's Samurai culture. First chapter sets the tales rough picture from there on it takes off and continues on fast pace with twists and turns right to the end.

 

 

Spin, I agree mostly with your assessment that Shogun is one of the greatest novels in recent memory but I was not that impressed with the TV series. But would a 6 hour movie treatment ala LOTR be better?

 

I have read every one of his major novels, and would rank Taipan and Shogun as the best. Little know fact is that he wrote the screenplay for the Great Escape!

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