Jump to content
REGISTERING FOR MEMBERSHIP ON UPLAND JOURNAL Read more... ×
Thinblueline

Do You Keep E-Collars On Your Dogs During Hunts?

Recommended Posts

Thinblueline

I thought I would try to raise my dog without an e-collar, but when my dog turned one year old in March, I could see him occasionally stop and consider his options when I would call him back to me. A couple times when he chose poorly, I had to run him down...something I decided I was not going to do on a regular basis. Combine that with the widespread opinion there is no more effective way than an e-collar to trash break a dog or keep him from making a beeline across a highway, and I finally broke down and bought a Dogtra e-collar with low to medium stimulation. After the proper introduction, he’s batting a thousand on his recalls.

 

I’m curious though how many guys strap on the e-collar each and every hunt, because it would seem like an irritating thing for the dog to run miles for hours with those probes against their neck. I have the right idea on fit so the collar doesn’t slip around on his neck, but still, those metal probes tight against the neck would seem bothersome. 

 

I’m also trying to figure out which device has to give way. I think my little dog has about a 12.5 inch neck, on which I plan to strap on a Garmin Astro T5 Mini GPS. I thought about strapping the beeper collar to him that I bought last year, run in point mode only, instead of a bell, to protect his hearing, but that doesn’t leave any room for his e-collar. I like the idea of the Dogtra 2500 beep and train, but my dog’s neck was so small I passed on it. Now when I get the GPS I’ll have three smaller devices, but three devices definitely aren’t going to fit. If I scratch the e-collar though, I’d hate to miss out on the chance to break him from chasing a deer or tackling a porky.

 

What do you guys do with your e-collars when it’s time to hunt?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gaberdeen

I know it’s a bit more money but I run the Garmin Alpha on my dogs. GPS and Ecollar built into one unit. I love mine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
oak stob

No...it depends upon need rather than routine.

 

I like seperate collars, simpler and less problems if one or tother has issues....not a bundler here.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
finsfurfeathers

If it was me I would drop the GPS before the e collar. Your Brit should recall way before you need to track it down with the GPS if it doesn't well that's what the e collar for. As you said there are many dangers and temptations for a young dog that control is sometimes a good thing. Also never had a problem with my dogs wearing the collar they actually get excited as they know its hunt time. There  is a fine line between too tight too loose and just right once found mark it on the collar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

37# Pointer here.

 

Astro ALWAYS. 

Regular name collar ALWAYS. 

Garmin Pro 70 doing anything but running a trial. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cooter Brown

With a young dog you want to be able to stop it chasing trash (deer, rabbits,etc.).  In your area you also want to be able to break it off porcupines.  Any of those things can lose a dog permanently if you have bad luck.  I wouldn't run a young dog without a collar for those reasons.

 

When you break a dog from chasing or jumping a porky, the collar is used differently than it is when you are reinforcing known command.  When the dog initiates the chase or starts at the porky, light it up hard--not the annoying buzz you use when reinforcing a command, but a serious zap.  I just turn the thing all the way up and give a 2 second shock.

 

When you do this don't say a word, don't yell, nothing.  You want the dog to associate the lightening bolt with what it's doing or the animal it's messing with, NOT with your voice.

 

I hate hurting a dog like that, but it works, and can save a dog from a bad fate.  And though I've never had to do it more than once, I think it's a good idea to leave the collar even on a mature dog in case it loses its mind.

 

I'm also a fan of the Alpha for hunting.  It's a game changer not having to worry at all about losing your dog.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Korthaar

My dogs have an ecollar on every time out. I see it as a safety tool to get my dogs at heel asap.  I want to know I can get them back should they venture close to a road, interfere with another hunter/dogs, or try a deer. 

I guess my bias stems from running beagles and hounds which are bred to focus on the trail no matter what.  That said, my collars have a tone button and most always a beep will suffice. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bull

Alpha always

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
boutdoors4

I should be getting my Alpha any day now, upgrading from an Astro 320 DC50 collar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jim Vander

Alpha on always in Uplands or Prairie. I was on a  trip years ago where a friends GSP disappeared and spent the night out on his own. We left a kennel out overnight and miraculously he was near it in the morning, he looked pretty spooked. When Alpha came out I was an early adopter. The young retrievers wear a collar waterfowling until Im content they don't slip and are handling with reasonable precision. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Craig Doherty

The only time one of my dogs (and that includes customer dogs) runs without an e-collar is in a field trial and then they have a garmin t-5 mini on as allowed by rules for recovery only if the dog runs off or is lost on point.  I think a Garmin Astro with a TT-15 mini would solve all your problems -- GPS replaces beeper and TT-15 is both GPS and e-collar in one.  One collar replaces three.  I leave the dog's regular collar on with an ID plate and thread a bell on.  The bells I run on most of the dogs are quite small but are good out to about 150 - 200 yards in the woods depending on the conditions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WPG Gizmo

My dogs see the collars coming out and they start doing back flips as they know that good times are going to happen they are going hunting.  I prefer to have a separate GPS and E Collar/Beeper the beeper I only run on point mode I dont run a bell as I cant hear it.  The GPS is great for checking on where the dogs are if you have not seen them check in for a period of time I have one spot I hunt that is a over grown apple orchard the dog gets into that stuff and they disappear from sight in 10 feet.

 

I run a Dogtra 2002 and a Astro 320 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MDash2

Alpha, mini 15 collar, Fenix 3 watch. Very pleased with the setup. I also strap on a standard blaze orange nylon collar for extra visibility as well as a better option to clip a leash when necessary than the e-collar. 

 

And yes, both collars stay on the dog until we finish the day afield.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yukon1

I always ran my Setters with e-collars, bells and occasionally a beeper set to "locate" mode. Last year I ditched the bells and beeper in favor of an Astro when I realized my hearing wasn't getting any younger, especially on windy days. I do miss the traditional sound of the bells sometimes but the dogs seem to keep track of me better without them and interestingly enough, I find I sleep better at night when I haven't been listening to bells all day...

 

(My Cocker wears no collars while hunting except name plate). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
C.J.L.
On 8/3/2018 at 7:56 PM, Cooter Brown said:

When you break a dog from chasing or jumping a porky, the collar is used differently than it is when you are reinforcing known command.  When the dog initiates the chase or starts at the porky, light it up hard--not the annoying buzz you use when reinforcing a command, but a serious zap.  I just turn the thing all the way up and give a 2 second shock.

Well when it comes to a porky while hunting, you are very seldom at the same location as the porky and the dog to administrate a corrective shock.  Typically ol Roy just comes back with quills in it's face, neck or side after attacking said porky on his account.  Only time I've witnessed a sticking was when one of my shorthairs was pointing a clump of short fir trees.  I walked around that clump kicking it and no bird came out so I told the dog "OK" and she jumped in. She jumped back out quick as you can snap your fingers with a face full of quills.  My bad.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×