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Your worse perdicament - out in the field; not in a bar.


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Mike da Carpenter
1 hour ago, steveziv said:

 

I always say duck hunting is expensive, inconvenient, uncomfortable and dangerous.  But when its good, man, there's nothing like it.

 

It is the MOST powerful addiction I have ever had.  Ended up naming my duck hunting boat “The Other Woman”, as that is where I spent all my time and money.

 

laying on the ice of Lake St. Clair during the late season was some of the most fun that could be had.  Just getting to the island “camp” was an adventure in itself.

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I was hunting elk in the Buffalo Peaks area of Colorado and I ran into a friend who was there with a couple of his buddies. I was hunting off my horse Comanche while they were afoot. On about the seco

I once told my wife that every year I was going to go hunting out of state for two weeks.

I had recently moved from North Dakota to Minnesota, I was duck hunting on a friends land. He had all the proper gear so all I needed was waders, gun and shells. This day I was hunting alone on a smal

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Dick Sellers

After the Exxon-Valdez oil tanker "accident", oil was washing ashore from Prince William Sound to the shores of the Alaska Peninsula. A wide range of studies were hurriedly designed to assess the impacts to wildlife.    Brown bears along the coast of Katmai National Park were known to forage along the tide line, digging razor clams, scavenging carcasses, etc.  I was the ADF&G wildlife biologist for the Alaska Peninsula and was assigned the job of assessing the effects of the oil contamination to the brown bears.  Within a couple of weeks, we had captured 55 bears, taking lots of samples (blood, hair, feces), affixing radios, etc.  Then came the job of flying about every 3 days the 150 mile to get to the study area to monitor these radio-marked bears.  The radios would change the pulse rate if it was immobile for more than 6 hours - an indication the bear was dead.  Then I had to get to the bear to take more samples to determine the cause of death, and if oil contamination was involved. 

 

So on this rainy August day I was making my way down a very step hillside into a ravine to investigate and recover a radioed bear, and I slipped, falling and bouncing my way roughly 50 feet down to the creek bottom.  I was knocked out, and when I came to I found myself in the creek and hurting from head to toe.  It took about 5 hours for a Coast Guard helicopter from Kodiak to arrive, lower a "rescue diver" and basket to get me out of there and then to the hospital in Kodiak.  In addition to the concussion, I had numerous facial cuts, 3 broken teeth, a dislocated jaw, compressed vertebra, stretched sternum, torn rotator cuff, partially collapsed lung, and of course hypothermic.

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10 hours ago, Fishnfowler said:

This is a recurrent topic, and I've told this story before, but there are new people here, so I'll tell it again.  30 years ago, I was hunting mule deer high in the Selkirks of N. Idaho.  I thought I hit a very large buck, but couldn't find a drop of blood or the arrow.  My headlamp died and I left for the night.  Early in the AM I returned with my spouse.  We were 4 miles from the rig and 8 miles up a 2-track from the road.  I found my arrow perfectly centered in a branch that stuck up and must have been in front of the deer.  My wife was up the hill on a stump catching some early morning rays while I looked around.  When she came down to me, I discovered she had dropped several arrows from my quiver.  I followed her tracks in the frost up the clearcut and managed to fall on a broadhead which entered my groin and cut my femoral artery.  I tried to remove the arrow, but it was hung up on the back of the broadhead.  I stuck my finger in along the shaft and freed up the three blades of the snuffer.  When it came out, blood sprayed as if from a garden hose about 15 feet with every heart beat.  I tried to stop it with direct pressure, but it was spraying out with a hiss no matter how hard I pushed.  I told my wife that I was dying and to go for help.  At this time I had 10 years of ER experience and was pretty savvy about my chances.  She ran off and I got to work with a tourniquet.  I managed to staunch the flow and several hours later a helicopter showed up.  I lost about 2/3 of my blood and was pretty pale for several months. There are more details, but I saved my life and my leg.  There is a hell of a pucker in my leg and a hitch in my get-a-long, but I'm here to tell the tale.   My advice is to let lost arrows lay. 

 

Thank God you had the knowledge and know how to save your life. Many years ago I read of a hunter in Wyoming who cut his femoral artery while field dressing an elk. His saga ended more badly than yours. It is very dangerous work using sharp knives in far from ergonomically advantaged conditions. 

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As young twenty-something’s, my friend and I backpacked by snowshoes 12 miles into the interior of Michigan’s UP Porcupine Mountains. Got snowed in during one of the worst early spring snowstorms in the state’s history. 

 

By by the grace of God my friend was a Forest service smokejumper from Montana and he dragged my sorry ass out of there - far enough to be rescued by UP rangers.

 

Ken

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I’ve never been very coordinated, in fact I was 16 years old before I was finally able to walk and chew gum at the same time. However, God in his wisdom compensated for my lack of coordination by giving me a very strong and durable body. I’ve always been that guy that shouts “I’m okay!!!” from the bottom of the cliff. Of course now that I’ve posted this I’ll probably have my last “OH Sh**!!!” moment this next hunting season. Oh well, I’ll be 71 in a few days and nobody lives forever. Someone else will have to worry about it.

Steve

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I was 22 and moose hunting in northern Ontario with four other guys.  We flew into the bush and set up camp in the afternoon.  It was mid-October.  One of the other guys and myself decided to take a canoe out and scout the shoreline of the lake we were on. The other guy's rifle had a scope and mine didn't so we were swapping rifles.  I have no idea why we didn't have binoculars.  Well during one of our swaps we both leaned the same way and the canoe flipped.  We both had our full hunting gear on and back in those days it was all wool.  When we flipped we both went totally under but fortunately the canoe didn't get pushed away from us.  We were able to hang on to it and swim our way to the nearest shore.  Had the canoe moved at all I never would have been able to get to it.  I would have ended up in the bottom of the lake the same as my rifle.  We were cold and wet but thankful to be alive.

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Jeez you guyslive dangerously. The worst that ever happened to me was a coiple of times when I forgot to pack tp in my vest pockets. Thank heavens I am a short guy whose shirts have a lot of tail!

 

One day while hunting with my BIL, I slipped off a frozen tire rut and broke my tibia. He walked out to get the truck and what shoud normally take an hour at most took him 3.Apparently he hunted all the way out and MY dog was at his best, with point after point! Really couldn’t get mad at him for doing what I taught him!

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Not one incident, but some serious pucker factor when I look back at it... In college, my buddy and I, two real dummies we were, would go put our sit-on-top kayaks into the New River and jump shoot ducks. Now, this jump shooting was ONLY good when it was cold enough to freeze up all the ponds or when we'd had heavy rains that blew out all the back creeks.

 

Of course, what that means is that two idiots were floating down a notoriously powerful river, quite far from civilization or even a road, in the dead of winter, in waders, in either well-below freezing temps or during flood-stage river levels, all in tippy little kayaks where the name of the game is to cross an eddy line while simultaneously trying to swing and fire a shotgun. 

 

We had a whole lot of almost-really-bad moments but came out pretty unscathed. In fact, I've had a recent itch to buy myself a canoe and do some jump shooting this year. 

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Since you did say predicament . First let me say this  some of these reads glad to hear it ended well.  

 

Springtime many yrs ago I was going to retrieve a loc-on tree stand from the prior season.  Hot late spring morning.  Get almost up to stand location and my stomach starts rumbling, sweat starts to form on my brow....... ut- oh...  I back up against a tree take care of business . Stand up feel'n much better . Walk about  20 yrds and there was a turkey hunter standing there.  I said to him "hey how ya do'n " his response with a smile was "better then you" 😃 I was like - oh ya saw that.   I wondered while walking away if he noticed before I embarked on task at hand I walked in circles like a dog looking for a place to go.....

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I had a crazy friend in high school. He used to live with his older brother, who was a car nut that lived for the high performance cars of the mid 1960's, and he had a number of them. One was a yellow 1965 GTO, tri-power, 4 speed, 4.30 rear... pretty fast car. In those days, we all would partake of the herb. One night, in the dead of winter, Lake Ronkonkoma, which had a reputation for claiming young men every year, was frozen over. We took that GTO out to the middle of the frozen lake... till we heard cracking sounds coming from beneath the car.

We got off that lake as quickly as we could, and I don't remember anyone laughing or in need of munchies when we reached the town beach..

 

https://www.newsday.com/lifestyle/recreation/secrets-of-lake-ronkonkoma-1.11455894

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9 hours ago, E.Young said:

Not one incident, but some serious pucker factor when I look back at it... In college, my buddy and I, two real dummies we were, would go put our sit-on-top kayaks into the New River and jump shoot ducks. Now, this jump shooting was ONLY good when it was cold enough to freeze up all the ponds or when we'd had heavy rains that blew out all the back creeks.

 

Of course, what that means is that two idiots were floating down a notoriously powerful river, quite far from civilization or even a road, in the dead of winter, in waders, in either well-below freezing temps or during flood-stage river levels, all in tippy little kayaks where the name of the game is to cross an eddy line while simultaneously trying to swing and fire a shotgun. 

 

We had a whole lot of almost-really-bad moments but came out pretty unscathed. In fact, I've had a recent itch to buy myself a canoe and do some jump shooting this year. 

My wife used to kayak this river and had some interesting experiences with gators

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SelbyLowndes

I got nothing.  You guys live interesting lives.  Any of your tales would make a good story for the old Outdoor Life "This Happened to Me" series.  I'm glad I ain't you...SelbyLowndes

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Mountain fell on me in British Columbia while bear hunting. That sucked.

 

Also fell though the ice on a beaver pond with my snowshoes on.  It's impossible to pull yourself back out with snowshoes still on.  Had to reach down and unzip my boot and kick my feet out then fished my boots and shoes out with my walking stick.  That really sucked too.  

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This one time a bunch of us went hunting sharpies and huns. We packed this really big lunch. When lunch time rolled around my buddy went to get the spread out of the cooler....no lunch...he had left it at home. We almost starved. We still talk about that day.

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Just now, Canuck said:

This one time a bunch of us went hunting sharpies and huns. We packed this really big lunch. When lunch time rolled around my buddy went to get the spread out of the cooler....no lunch...he had left it at home. We almost starved. We still talk about that day.

 

Same thing except we left the tailgate open.

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