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martyg

Making 4Runner More Off Road Comfortable

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martyg

I have been contemplating a 2019 TRD. The cons are that I have a very solid 2000 4Runner, i don't care if i dent my current 4Runner, I don't care if I haul mulch in my current 4Runner. and registration for the current 4Runner costs almost nothing. The pros of  anew vehicle are that the seat won't poke springs into my ass and I get a better sound system.

 

My goal is more comfort on FS roads / jeep trails. I have a few roads that access trailheads that access lakes where big, stupid trout live.  It takes me less time to climb the 3,000 - 4,000 vertical feet on a mtn bike than it does to drive it. I have no interest in rock crawling. If something is that steep I was equipped with legs so I can walk it.

 

Thinking about 33" tires, 2" lift, some pimp-ass suspension that was suggested to me by a shop, alloy swing arms to reduce sprung weight.

 

Has anyone been down this road before?

 

Thanks in advance.

 

 

 

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E.Young

I had a 4th gen T4R with Bilstein 5100s, Toytec coilovers, and SPC UCAs and ball joints. 3" of lift and 33's. The ride was substantially nicer than stock and it was very capable off-road while still very easy to drive around town and on the highway. Gas mileage was reduced, but it was never going to be good anyway. 

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C.J.L.

I put 33" on my sons 4 runner (2010 maybe?) and just a lift and level on the frontend.  It looks and drives great. Didn't see the need to get crazy with the suspension since he doesn't go where no truck or jeep has gone before.  If I can get there in my jeep, he can get there in his 4 runner.  

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E.Young

Yep - the level will do fine for you, too. I did my T4R because it was at 196k and the suspension had begun to need replacement. The end of life for stock suspension is, in my mind, the best time to lift. If you do it in the beginning, though, you can recoup a lot of the lift costs by selling your suspension to folks looking to un-lift and sell their trucks. Of course, I'd recommend keeping the stock suspension in the basement for when you decide to sell. You'll come out on top selling it with stock suspension and selling the lift separately. 

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Speaks

I go back and forth between new and old trucks. About the time I buy a new one I am soon busting down logging roads and beating it up, then I will get a beat up old one and not do much of that, miss the comfort, and end up swapping. I guess I really just need two trucks..... 

 

In terms of a lift the above advice is solid. 

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River19

I have a 2009 GX which is basically a 3rd gen 4 runner with a larger body and nicer interior and the V8 standard.....air suspension stock in rear and still there but with top flight ICON adjustable shocks with remote reservoir etc.  Front will be getting Toytec BOSS coilovers in the next few weeks.  I run 32" tires and even with the stock front suspension height It is more than comfy for whatever logging roads throw at me.

 

I've gone down the rabbit hole as well on my Tundra and the best thing I did was front lift of 2".....didn't need more and didn't care to deal with new uppers and lowers up front etc.

Whatever you do, avoid any "lift" that is just screws with your springs (ie. blocks) etc. just makes things stiffer....you want comfort.  Tires, and the right tire pressure seem to be a key as well.....run those roads with highway psi and you may want new fillings and kidneys......maybe a good onboard air system capable of real pressures to air back up would be something to think about.

 

Also, how much weight will you be putting in or on this rig?  People tend to go lift and suspension first, then before you know it, roof top tent, sliding drawer system, winch bumper, extra fuel cans etc. and now they are like 800lbs heavier than before and that suspension is all wrong for the weight.....

Just my random thoughts.....

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SelbyLowndes

I drive a 2016 4-Runner.  Stock SR5.  No mountains down here but lots of swampy trails. If the Taliban can go to war in them, mine ought to get me in and out of the woods...SelbyLowndes

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BlacknTan

I've got a 2015 (5th gen) 4Runner Trail Edition, It's got everything the TRD Pro has except the exorbitant price tag. I wanted the E-Locker, which, in truth, you don't really need with the A-TRAC system, so an SR-5 would have been just fine, and less $$$ to boot.

That said, I changed coil oversin front and shocks in the rear, for a mild lift.. 1 1/2 inches, using the Bilstein 6112/5160 system. Adjustable up front for your desired lift. I did not want to stress CV joints excessively, so I stayed conservative. I have the TRD skidplate, and I upgraded wheels and tires. The wheels are 17 x 8 with 0 offset, what the factory should have used. Tires are also conservative.. I want to be able to hear the radio, and myself think, on the highway. Toyo Open Country AT ll's in stock size. I also clearanced the front bumper cover the way they do it at the port for the Pro models. These vehicles can be sensitive to overly large tires and big offsets. It often creates rubbing, as Toyota USA found out with the Pro models, hence the bumper cover trimming.

That's about it... the 4Runner is highly capable in every way just as it comes from the factory... I think you have made an excellent choice!

 

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martyg
10 hours ago, E.Young said:

I had a 4th gen T4R with Bilstein 5100s, Toytec coilovers, and SPC UCAs and ball joints. 3" of lift and 33's. The ride was substantially nicer than stock and it was very capable off-road while still very easy to drive around town and on the highway. Gas mileage was reduced, but it was never going to be good anyway. 

 

E - any tire rub? No body lift? Would that be a 275 tire? Thanks.

 

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E.Young

To be honest, I don't recall the exact tire size, but I think they were 285s.

 

Anyway, yes, they will probably rub. Most after-market UCAs will be shaped to alleviate the slight to moderate rubbing and at 2-3" of lift, you have a 50/50 chance of needing UCAs to keep alignment on point anyway. If you can keep things in alignment without new UCAs but do rub, the most economical solution is wheel spacers, the most expensive solution is new wheels. In my book, the UCAs are the smart money in the long term for wear and safety's sake. 

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BlacknTan
50 minutes ago, E.Young said:

To be honest, I don't recall the exact tire size, but I think they were 285s.

 

Anyway, yes, they will probably rub. Most after-market UCAs will be shaped to alleviate the slight to moderate rubbing and at 2-3" of lift, you have a 50/50 chance of needing UCAs to keep alignment on point anyway. If you can keep things in alignment without new UCAs but do rub, the most economical solution is wheel spacers, the most expensive solution is new wheels. In my book, the UCAs are the smart money in the long term for wear and safety's sake. 

 

Yes..

 

285's are pushing the envelope on a 5th gen. That, and over 2 inches of lift can require UCA's to bring alignment into spec. 275's are more do-able, but be aware your speedo will be off, but, you can drive by the tach.

Further, 285's often require a "body mount chop" to prevent rubbing of the forward body mount. It requires cutting and welding in a reinforcement. I don't have the intestinal fortitude for that on a new rig... Particularly just for appearance sake.

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WPG Gizmo

On the 2003 I had I did a 2 inch lift and changed the shocks out to Bilstein 5100's everything stayed in spec and the system worked great off road I had no issues running 33's.

 

You can go higher then 2 inches but the cost quickly rises with each inch you add.  The 2 inch lift cost me around $400 and was very similar to this one https://bilsteinlifts.com/shop/toyota-4runner/1996-2002/lift-kits-96-02/bilstein-5100-0-2-3-lift-front-rear-shocks-1996-2002-toyota-4runner-4wd/?gclid=CjwKCAjwtvnbBRA5EiwAcRvnprG8GNs3soOIL537cAT0LhTZLRQRWp_QZf4ktRJnzJjvkmL-3syz0hoCNg8QAvD_BwE

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bjorn240

For less than the price of a TRD Pro, you can get a 2015 LC200 or LX 570 with less than 25,000 miles.  I love the way the TRD Pro looks and I went back and forth a few times, but after really looking at the specs of each, I am happy with:

 

IMG_3172.JPG

 

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River19
On 10/23/2018 at 9:15 PM, bjorn240 said:

For less than the price of a TRD Pro, you can get a 2015 LC200 or LX 570 with less than 25,000 miles.  I love the way the TRD Pro looks and I went back and forth a few times, but after really looking at the specs of each, I am happy with:

 

IMG_3172.JPG

 

 

You should be, that is a superior vehicle, LC200 platform is outstanding.  Heavy but that isn't a real issue.  I love my GX after taking my first week long hunting trip with it.  Very capable, comfortable, dogs were in comfort, space for gear etc.

 

Love it.

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bobman

The engineers at the factory do it right lifting a nice vehicle is always a mistake

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