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Dogwood

Years 2015-2017. Ford F 150 or Chevy Silverado?

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DonT
50 minutes ago, River19 said:

I think Ford and the Aluminum body is heading in an interesting direction, but the frames are still steel right?

 

Yes the frames are Steel but Ford and Dodge E-Coat the frames and GM still uses a wax coating, although I am not sure about the 2019 body style.  Frame rust was terrible on my last GMC and I wasn't going down that road again, drove a new Ford, now I have my first Ford, I like it a lot.  2016 F150 Super crew long bed 5.0 L 

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River19
29 minutes ago, DonT said:

 

Yes the frames are Steel but Ford and Dodge E-Coat the frames and GM still uses a wax coating, although I am not sure about the 2019 body style.  Frame rust was terrible on my last GMC and I wasn't going down that road again, drove a new Ford, now I have my first Ford, I like it a lot.  2016 F150 Super crew long bed 5.0 L 

 

Frame rust.  Something I know all too well.  One of our 3 rigs is a 2001 Tundra......I HAD a 2001 F-250 as well.  Toyota famously recalled and replaced a lot of their frames, mine included in 2011 with 155K on it..... by 2014 my Ford didn't look much better than when Toyota said mine was unsafe and replaced it and the old Ford bodies I swear were built from rust to begin with....Turned that in for my 2014 Ram 2500 and couldn't be happier.  My 2001 Tundra?  Still kicking strong at 250K and the body still has only a couple spots of rust from rock damage.....new frame looks solid still.......so hopefully ford solved for their frame rust issues as well.....

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settem
On 11/16/2018 at 9:41 AM, WI Outdoor Nut said:

 

Having pulled many loads with the GM 5.3 powerplant in the last 15+ years, if you start to slow due to headwind, hill or very heavy load, it will drop down a gear or two and "really spin" to gain back that speed.  In comparison to the ecoboost, for the most part, the gear does not change, the turbo's just spin and feels much smoother.  Not to say the 5.3 GM is bad, and for most applications, has more than enough power, but to move loads down the road at HWY speeds, it drops gears, and increases RPM.  Pull 5-6000#'s with this motor and you will see what I mean.  If all you are hauling is a few dogs, I think it would be a great truck. 

I get it now...

So a 5.3 Silverado would struggle to haul more than a few dogs, but that Ecoboost won’t even have to gear down with 6000lbs... 

 

I guess I’ve been on borrowed time with my 5.3 and the thousands of miles I’ve pulled cars, Jeeps, tractors, boats, or a usually very overloaded dump trailer. 

I guess I was pretty lucky to have ever made it out of Virginia the four times I hauled that slide-in camper, three dogs, and a months worth of gear to Montana. 

 

 

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bobman

Hahaha we aren’t talking about girl friends they are just trucks and they are all a PITA sometimes, well then again maybe there are some similarities 

 

I buy the best deal I don’t think any of them have a huge advantage over the others

 

I currently have two dodges, two fords, one Silverado and a Tacoma everyone of them are handy for something 

 

 

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salmontogue

If you are hauling serious weight, want a long-term durable pickup and hate repair trips to the dealer/garage, there is one clear choice....Ram/Cummins.  I have owned multiples and they are great trucks.  My understanding is that the new Ford diesel is awesome but I have no personal experience with them....yet.

 

In gas trucks, the Ram Hemi and the Ford Eco-boost have great followings and great reviews.

 

I gave up on everything GM due to reliability issues and fighting over sleazy refusals to honor the GM warranty.  I know some folks love them but my experiences have been substantially negative. They have lost me forever.

 

Perk

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settem

Aww come on Bobman everybody loves a good truck debate😀

 

Perk, as much as I tow I probably need to make the jump to a diesel, but the cost of admission is a little to steep for me. 

I understand your dislike for GM. A truck is a big investment and you have to go with what works for you. 

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salmontogue
22 minutes ago, settem said:

Aww come on Bobman everybody loves a good truck debate😀

 

Perk, as much as I tow I probably need to make the jump to a diesel, but the cost of admission is a little to steep for me. 

I understand your dislike for GM. A truck is a big investment and you have to go with what works for you. 

 

The diesel option is just slightly under 10k, a whole lot of money.  The diesel trucks are a more robust build and amortize the increased cost with longer term usage.  I have had all my diesels for over 250k miles and sold them for, in my opinion, a whole lot of money, way more than a similar vintage gas truck.  Having said that, if you don't do a lot of heavy towing, the diesel is probably overkill.

 

Perk

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bobman

Have you had a late model Cummins with all the emissions stuff

 

I was wondering if that’s figured out yet I’ve been thinking about selling my fleet lol and getting a tradesman crew cab dually 4x4 and pull a toy hauler behind it with a Jeep or some kind of atv in it

 

been looking at the ATC toy haulers they are all aluminum and real basic which I want so I can outfit it the way I want it for bird hunting

 

I keep flip flopping around and can’t make up my mind Cummins or the 6.4 Hemi

 

my wife and daughters would use the truck the rest of the year for pulling their darn horses around

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salmontogue

The new diesels, all of them regardless of make, have DEF injection system problems.  The fluid needs to be fresh, the DEF tank needs to be filled frequently and you need to be certain that the DEF fluid is not allowed to freeze.  The EPA is considering changing their DEF regulations due to the problems.  There has been no official announcements yet.

 

The toy haulers are nice.  I have an enclosed 36' High Country aluminum double car hauler that I have used for snowmobiles, ATVs and various cars/suvs.  It is an easy hauler and is very stable.  The GVW is 14k#.  It could be towed by a full-size half ton although not at full capacity.  You may find that to be true with the toy haulers.

 

A typical two horse trailer with a dressing room can be pulled by many full-sized half tons.  When you stretch that to include three or four horses and living quarters, a larger truck is a necessity.

 

A lot of folks like DRW for the added stability.  Pulling something like a big Montana (or similar fifth wheel) is more comfortable with the wider rear stance particularly in crosswinds.  DRW pickups are more easily stuck in off-road situations with soft or worse driving surfaces.  That $1700 option gets you a standard 4.10/4.11 rear axle ratio which is only helpful with extremely heavy loads and it reduces fuel economy.  Everything in life has trade-offs.  If the horse hauling is not long distance at highway speeds, the SRW option may be preferred.  It certainly is easier to maneuver.

 

An important consideration is that the three quarter and one ton trucks have substantially larger braking systems and are more stable in emergency stopping situations particularly when under heavy loads.  The diesels have engine brakes more commonly known as Jake brakes, another advantage.

 

If I was towing less than 8k miles per year and none of the towed loads were over 10k pounds, I would seriously consider the big Hemi.  I never would have recommended that previously but the DEF injection situation is a mess.

 

Perk

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bobman

Thanks

 

I have a 97 dually F 350 crew cab 2 wd with a 460 in it it’s in good shape so I might just live with it. It only has 150 k on it so it’s got a lot of life left and they don’t rust where I live,

has a glitchy trans that acts up and shifts hard sometimes. One of fords stupid ideas the way it’s electronics work

 

I like a dually for towing they are super stable but you’re correct they will get stuck on a wet leaf.

 

 I don’t care about gas mileage They all get around 10 if your pulling anything of consequence in my experience, the diesels just pull a lot stronger. I’ve had a couple 7.3s they were nice and simple like an engine should be

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blanked

Salmontontogue you certainly know trucks.  Any opinion on rear end for the hemi 6.4 towing 10,000 pounds.  Not concerned about economy.  Fair amount of hill / mountain driving.  Currently have a 3.73 and some research says 4.10 not enough some guys going 4:56. Thoughts

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salmontogue
6 hours ago, bobman said:

Thanks

 

I have a 97 dually F 350 crew cab 2 wd with a 460 in it it’s in good shape so I might just live with it. It only has 150 k on it so it’s got a lot of life left and they don’t rust where I live,

has a glitchy trans that acts up and shifts hard sometimes. One of fords stupid ideas the way it’s electronics work

 

I like a dually for towing they are super stable but you’re correct they will get stuck on a wet leaf.

 

 I don’t care about gas mileage They all get around 10 if your pulling anything of consequence in my experience, the diesels just pull a lot stronger. I’ve had a couple 7.3s they were nice and simple like an engine should be

 

I wouldn't replace that truck until it becomes absolutely necessary.  You know what you have and a new one can produce surprises until the kinks are wrung out. I like crew cabs and I like the 460 which is a proven and reliable engine.  The hard shifting may be a sensor problem particularly if there is not excessive slip in the torque converter.  An R&R on that transmission, if necessary, is usually around 3K, more or less.  We have the Ford Sync system in a Lincoln Navigator and it is mediocre at best.  The new versions are greatly improved. 

 

The new gas trucks will do better than 10 mpg under heavy loads.  Twelve or thirteen is not unusual and that is accomplished through electronic fuel management and substantially improved transmissions with more speed ranges.  Properly set up diesels can achieve fifteen mpg, sometimes a little more.  The diesels are superior tow machines but the added cost, nearly 10k, is only supported by a lot of heavy towing.  10k buys an awful lot of gasoline.  Also consider the DEF injection problems which have plagued all the new diesels.

 

Perk

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salmontogue
3 hours ago, blanked said:

Salmontontogue you certainly know trucks.  Any opinion on rear end for the hemi 6.4 towing 10,000 pounds.  Not concerned about economy.  Fair amount of hill / mountain driving.  Currently have a 3.73 and some research says 4.10 not enough some guys going 4:56. Thoughts

 

Many trailer haulers overestimate the weight of their typically loaded trailers.  I have weighed mine on truck sales which are available at sand and gravel companies, cement plants and ag plants.  Many truck stops have scales.  You should weigh some of your typical loads to get a clear idea of weight.

 

How is your current 3.73 working in your driving area?  A 4.10 will accelerate a load faster and should be more than adequate with loads up to 12k.  Beyond that, a diesel is the best choice and negates the use of 4.56 ratios.  The 4.56 spins a gas engine too hard at all speeds, creates earlier wear failure and the fuel economy is dismal.

 

Dodge has enhanced the tow capacity of their Ram 1500 to the level of 9k and with a 3.21 ratio.  This is possible because their eight speed transmission has two very low first and second gears which work well in getting loads moving.  More pickups will be using transmissions like the ten speeds in Fords which are new but will likely transform towing/hauling significantly.

 

If the EPA ever modifies the DEF injection requirements with new diesels and manufacturers supply transmission for them with more speeds, the results for towing will be magic.  The large gassers, most with greatly improved torque numbers at lower revs and with more speeds in the transmissions will decrease the need for diesels except for the heaviest of loads.  I really like diesels but am unhappy with the DEF injection mess.  At this moment if I was buying a new pickup for hauling, I would look at the large gas engine models.  My comments are based on personal experience with Ram and Ford.

 

My last GM was a 2002 one ton crew cab 4x4 DRW diesel.  It was a very pretty truck but it was a mechanical and electronic nightmare.  You shouldn't have to replace injectors and injector pumps every 50k to 60k miles, a pricey repair. The transmission was excellent but the front end was wimpy.  At that time, GM used what is called a common electrical bus for sensor communications with engine control modules.  The individual signals are multiplexed with an identifying carrier.  In theory, it is a brilliant piece of work and hugely simplifies wiring harnesses.  In practice, it created substantial problems.  I'm sure they eventually debugged that system but my sample had constant problems that were fixed by dumping it.

 

Perk

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dogrunner

Next year some time Ford is supposed to come out with a new 7.3 gasser for the Super duty. 

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salmontogue
10 minutes ago, dogrunner said:

Next year some time Ford is supposed to come out with a new 7.3 gasser for the Super duty. 

 

Combined with the ten speed transmission, it will probably be a winner.

 

Perk

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