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.22 blanks


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I want to do some training in the off-season, but I don't have, and really don't want to buy a blank gun. I see that I could buy .22 blanks. Any downside to using .22 blanks in a handgun for training...damage to the gun?

 

thanks

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Westksbowhunter

If your doing gun intro I would not recommend shooting 22 blanks.  Get a training pistol that shoots the acorn crimps.  Pretty cheap through Lion Country Supply.  

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JMO. For gun intro I use one of these from Lion Country: https://www.lcsupply.com/Retriev-R-Trainer-Basic-Kit/productinfo/RTR/

It is loud and louder yet if you use the .22 green nail gun blanks from the hardware store. Green will blast the dummy out a 100 yds or more. The blanks come in varying strengths/loudness and are color coded..  Let the pup work out in front a ways, whistle for his attention, turn 90 degrees or more from the dog, and fire horizontal to the ground. The white dummy bounces along for eye popping appeal. If you wet the inside sleeve of the dummy it will be quieter and won't shoot as far. The handy thing about the unit is that the dog will love it his whole life, gives them exercise, teaches retrieving and marking.

And it is just plain fun in the off season. Try it first without the pup.

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I just use cheap .22 shorts in a regular .22 handgun and make sure it's pointed safely at the ground and away from the pup.

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No problems at all.

 

I always start with acorn crimps, but the newer ones can be problematic in blank pistols. No problems with .22 short blanks, just start further away...

 

As Greg states, pointing the pistol low and toward the ground can save your ears a bit. Even .22 shorts can be quite loud.

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I start with the smokeless acorn crimps very early and in the house employ a jury rigged gun pocket (large rectangular cover made from a strip of old carpeting folded over and "Sewn"  together at the ends with soft craft wire). Make it big enough to fit the blank gun in your hand to sit deep inside. Muffles the sound down and helps keep the smell down and "she who must be obeyed" from complaining. I like to use this early on when food is put down. The idea is the dog will very early get use to the shot and associate it with something pleasurable. Later on outside I go with Black powder blanks. Plenty loud although a bit of gun cleaning is a good idea after training sessions.

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 Blanks are a lot quieter out of a single shot 22 bolt rifle and the young dog gets used to seeing a long gun

 

they are loud in a regular revolver but won’t hurt it

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If you have a .22LR revolver, you can use just about any blanks in it with no issues.  Just make sure it is actually legal to be carrying the pistol itself, since it is a weapon.  A starter or training pistol has a solid barrel and thus is incapable of firing a projectile.  A starter pistol is NOT a firearm according to the ATF so there are no legal issues with carrying or possessing as I understand it.

 

As to .22 blanks, they come in a variety of forms.  The acorn crimps mentioned above are about the lowest volume of them all.   The black powder crimps are about the loudest of them all and the CCI crimps are not quite as loud as the black powder ones.  The Nail gun loads are in between with the lower power loads(2)  being noisier than acorn crimps, but not by much.  I use the #2 crimps myself when using a 22 blank gun.  These days I mostly use a blank gun which fires 209 shotgun primers, mostly because the primers are are cheap compared to 22 crimps of any type.

 

The report from a .22, no matter what kind, is different from a shotgun report.  It seems to me that the shotgun report, in addition to being louder, is a lower deeper sound. 

 

RayG

 

 

 

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I have used the various .22 nail gun loads for quite a few years. While they are more money than shotgun primers, they are still pretty cheap.

 

You can go from a pretty light report to,  if you use the level 5's, load loud enough that more than a few field trialers use them in place of 32 caliber blanks. 32 caliber blanks aren't that easy to find and are spendy.

 

I introduce gunfire when a young dog is in full chase mode with a wild bird. First when they are quite a distance away, and then closer and louder over time.

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At one time, .32 blanks were required for real (non AKC) field trials. I don't know if they're still required, but I still have a bunch.

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21 minutes ago, BlacknTan said:

At one time, .32 blanks were required for real (non AKC) field trials. I don't know if they're still required, but I still have a bunch.

 

They allow 209 shotgun primers, and many trialers use them in trials. A few people use 32 caliber blank guns. More than a few of them must reload for them and it is amusing how quiet they can get them.

 

As I said earlier .22 blank guns with nail gun blanks get used, even thou they are not officially blessed, as far as I know. 

 

One advantage of both primer  and .22 blank guns is that their cylinders hold many more rounds than a .32. It is a pia to reload during a brace.

 

 

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Metal garbge cans or anything that can make a loud noise around the house is what I start out with. Don't use a blank gun anymore. I run my dogs at least once a week on state WMA's once the nesting bird restrictions are off (mid July here). I take a 20 ga and just shoot it away from the pup when it is a ways off to start. Never had a problem yet. I have an older dog though and that sure helps. When they hear a loud impact noise many pups will check to see want the old dog does.

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Birdcountry70

I used to buy black powder 22 blanks because they seem louder with more of a shotgun like boom than the regular blanks in a revolver. The downside was the crud that had to be cleaned out of the gun each day.

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