Jump to content

BEST OVERALL RIFLE FOR HUNTING AFRICAN PLAINS GAME?


Upland_Hunter

Recommended Posts

UH,Just for interest sake ,my go to rifle now (last 25 years) is  7x57mm ,hunted almost every thing from duiker to Kudu with it.Got rid of  most of the other dust collectors years ago(223/270 and 30.06 ).The perfect battery for Africa ,375,h+h, 7x57mm and a 12g shotgun 👍

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 31
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Marc Ret

    4

  • redwing

    4

  • Upland_Hunter

    3

  • lee sykes

    2

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

UH,Just for interest sake ,my go to rifle now (last 25 years) is  7x57mm ,hunted almost every thing from duiker to Kudu with it.Got rid of  most of the other dust collectors years ago(223/270 and 30.0

I've posted these before but I don't mind posting them again to offer a bit more persuasion.     My wildebeest I referenced earlier.      Random pics from camping in Hwa

marc ret, an old 'campfire tale' that stems from the Anglo/Boer war in the early 1900,s ,the Afrikaaners(Boers) were armed with 7mm mausers,(which in its day was the best military rifle around) and th

Posted Images

3 hours ago, redwing said:

UH,Just for interest sake ,my go to rifle now (last 25 years) is  7x57mm ,hunted almost every thing from duiker to Kudu with it.Got rid of  most of the other dust collectors years ago(223/270 and 30.06 ).The perfect battery for Africa ,375,h+h, 7x57mm and a 12g shotgun 👍

 

Redwing, have you ever heard the .303 British referred to as a "baboon gun"? One of my best friends immigrated here with his family from SA a decade ago. He told me one time that he and his friends in South Africa referred to the .303 as a "baboon gun" because when a baboon hears the shot it drops but due to the leisurely velocity of the .303 by the time the bullet reaches the target it's standing upright again. Just curoius if it's a localized nomer to where he grew up and hunted. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Upland_Hunter
On 1/16/2019 at 8:39 PM, Marc Ret said:

Just as important as a gun you shoot well and of sufficient caliber is the selection of a quality bullet like Barnes or Swift's A Frame. My one hunt there I used a .375 H&H. Having watched the wildebeest I shot run a couple hundred yards with a completely destroyed heart  compliments of a 300gr Partition gave me a respect for how tough some African game can be. 

 

A 30-06 would be a good starting point.  .300 H&H is a classic African cartridge with a slight edge on the '06. If longer shots are likely, I think a .300 Wby would be a fine choice. From there I'd probably go to the .375. 

 

Winter time dreaming or are you actively considering a hunt? 

At the moment winter time dreaming but looking to may actually doing a African hunt in 2 to 3 years. A friend of mime went to SA twice and Namabia once and after hearing about his experience a fire was ignited. Over the Christmas holidays I read Robert Ruark's "Use Enough Gun" and "Robert Ruark's Africa" and this ignited the fire even more. Did you hunt in SA? Who did you hunt with when you were there?

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Upland_Hunter said:

At the moment winter time dreaming but looking to may actually doing a African hunt in 2 to 3 years. A friend of mime went to SA twice and Namabia once and after hearing about his experience a fire was ignited. Over the Christmas holidays I read Robert Ruark's "Use Enough Gun" and "Robert Ruark's Africa" and this ignited the fire even more. Did you hunt in SA? Who did you hunt with when you were there?

 

Ruark and others can be tough on the bank account! You should read "Horn of the Hunter" if you haven't already. I would really encourage you to go if it's feasible for you. You won't regret it. 

 

I hunted Zimbabwe. I spent the better part of a month there with a friend who lived there for close to a decade. One of the best times of my life. Traveling with him afforded me a lot of opportunities to really experience the country in the time I was there. My PH's name was Brett Enslin. I'm not sure if he's still doing safaris as I was there ten years ago and his taxidermy business was really growing when I hunted with him.

 

The friend that I was with in Zim hunted Namibia a few years ago. He had a really good safari with a young upstart in the business. All truly wild animals, no high-fence operation. I can get the info from him if you'd like. All I remember offhand is the PH/owner was named Dreekus. If I were to go back, Namibia would probably be high on the list. 

 

My South African buddy has hunted Zambia, Zim and SA. Having lived there for the first 35 years of his life, he has a lot of good contacts but a lot of them are through friends he still has on the continent. He and I are three months apart in age. Five years ago, we had planned a trip for our fortieth birthdays but that fell through for me and I didn't make it. He typically goes back every other year to see family and friends and always manages to squeeze a few days of hunting in... Jerk. Again, I can talk to him to see if he can offer any recommendations if you'd like. 

 

A few pics to help dissuade you from going-

 

 

My South African buddy with a bushbuck and a warthog 

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

 

 

Warthog and springbok from my friend's Namibia trip

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've posted these before but I don't mind posting them again to offer a bit more persuasion.  

 

My wildebeest I referenced earlier. 

image.thumb.jpeg.24ebf191ce91180f8572be3d41f1a6a6.jpeg

 

 

Random pics from camping in Hwange NP. 

image.thumb.jpeg.c2e25ec8b002ba422fbefb18c5cfef19.jpegimage.thumb.jpeg.e7265e81c54e56f1481ded187127a186.jpegimage.thumb.jpeg.fd410633418cf1b29c7cb62382f6f4e0.jpeg

 

 

If you need any more inspirational photos, I can add more.😇😇

Link to post
Share on other sites

UH,i live in SA(have hunted all over the country)most of the hunts have been on private land, unguided.,but have the opportunity to hunt in some of the national parks over the years,Here local trackers(parks board rangers) are assigned to each hunter.these guys are absolutely brilliant ,very seldom do they not find a wounded animal and their knowledge of the bush is amazing.Two of my good friends(  professional hunter outfitters) are currently in Reno for the SCI hunters convention.Will send you their contact details on PM if interested 

Link to post
Share on other sites

marc ret, an old 'campfire tale' that stems from the Anglo/Boer war in the early 1900,s ,the Afrikaaners(Boers) were armed with 7mm mausers,(which in its day was the best military rifle around) and the brits brought along their 303,s.there is no doubt that the 7mm was better,but the boers were all great marksman, farmers who had grown up in the country, from little they were out hunting and knew how scarce ammo was and made every shot count.Remember these were the guys that started the commandos/spes units we know today.The word commando comes from the Afrikaans/dutch  word ,Komando.which essentially was a group of horse mounted Boer snipers that used guerrilla tactics on the Brits.There is still a fierce competition between the English speaking (Engelsmanne) and the Afrikaans speaking(Boere) especially when it comes to sport, but particularly hunting and shooting .In our farming community there is a keen interest in long range shooting and who's the best shot.Never the less, going back to the ,'bobejaan geweer"(baboon gun),obviously not the greatest long range calibre, but still a great short range one.There are literally thousands here,,sporterised ex military rifles still been used today.I had one for years and no baboon ever scoffed at it😂 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I wish I could post pictures I have, but I don't have permission and don't want to risk my job. 

 

I few years ago I visited a customer, a wealthy oil man.  His offices were filled with African trophies.  I'm told what I saw was just the spill over that couldn't fit in the mans home.  His secretary told me that she hated walking down the "hallway of death" that connected one side of the building to the other but had grown used to the giant cap buffalo that loomed right over her head.  She also told me that she had heard it said that he had spent over a million dollars on taxidermy alone.   The "hallway of death" was filled with plains game.  The glass conference room was surrounded by lions and leopards.  The walls were covered in zebra and other hides I couldn't identify.  

 

It doesn't seem fair.  It seemed he was just after quantity.  He couldn't tell me what game tasted best or much about his hunts at all.  Second time I was there he had just got back from getting an elephant.  Never even shot a whitetail or turkey in his home state.  Imagine that?  Guy's probably killed more pounds of meat than half the people on UJ combined, and I doubt he could even figure out how to get a deer in his own back yard.  Don't want to begrudge or judge the man to harshly, seemed nice enough.  But damn, I'm jealous of the opportunity he's had.  I purposely have not read Ruark.  I'm not likely to ever have the time and money to take advantage of the adventures available on this continent, never mind travel to the other side of the world.  No sense torturing myself, I'd rather not know what I'm missing.   

 

I'll count my blessings and be thankful that while I haven't heard the thunder of an elephant trumpet, I've still felt the grunt of a big bull moose in my chest.  I'll never have a distant lions roar raise the hair on the back of my neck, but I've felt the unease of having a pack of coyote circle me in the dark as I dragged a buck out of the woods.    I won't have halls of taxidermy rivaling many natural history museums, but I have a few of my best memories preserved on my walls.  

 

For those fortunate enough to get to Africa, I hope you have a beautiful and epic adventure and you're able to soak it all in before the hunt is over.   I've always suspected that those one or two week African hunts are such a whirlwind that they are over and done with before you can fully appreciate where you are.

 

Oh, and based on zero African experience, my recommendation for a rifle is the largest one that you can honestly shoot accurately.   

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

These's a guy I know from another forum that lives in S Africa and hunts with a .30-30 (uses Win Power-point factory ammo). His trophy wall of non-dangerous game is impressive. Another I know in Australia hunts scrub bulls with the .30-30 and 150 grain core-loks. The .30-06 is plenty of gun.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The '06 with 180 grain nosler partitions at 2700fps a boring, utterly reliable combo for about 98.7% of what's out there.

 

Maybe you could spice it up with a 200 grain nosler? :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

AN opinion from someone who has never been to Africa...

 

The 30-'06 with 180 or 200 grain bullets is more than adequate.

 

The .338 Win Mag with 225 grain premium bullets would be optimal. Knock down power, reasonably flat trajectory. This cartridge kills elk like a 30'06 kills deer.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've hunted in Africa 3 times; twice in Tanzania and once in Zimbabwe. I loved hunting  with my .375 (the minimum for a lot of stuff) and .470, but most of my animals were taken with a .300WM.   Used my handloads for each with bullets selected for over there.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
Don fischer

Never been to Africa but always wanted to go. Not gonna make it I'm afraid. One thing I think I got about it through reading is the most important component is not the cartridge but the bullet. Seem's to me it's always a heavy for caliber bullet! I suspect that the 6.5's with 156gr class bullet's would work fine. 175gr in 7mm's and 200gr in 30's. Guessing a 308 with a 200gr bullet would be fine. I don't think you could carry anything that would be good to go for a charge by some dangerous game. I doubt even a lion would be able to take a well placed 200gr 30 cal bullet. At the same time it might not be a good idea on something like a Cape Buffalo! Then again a 458 with 500gr solids will probably pretty will stop anything from a Dik Dik on up! You'd have to decide just how much your willing to carry! I read years ago where Elennor O'Conner only ever killed one elephant. Did it with a 30-06! Oh well, so much for that theory. The range of animals in Africa is huge and I think one can get over gunned pretty easy. If I ever did make it there now, I'd carry my Nikon and a couple nice lens! I have lost my desire to shoot an animal there for some reason.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×
×
  • Create New...