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Favorite Outdoor writers


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3 hours ago, Marc Ret said:

I met and chatted for a while with him a few years ago. Decent enough guy but the one thing that really struck me was what a small man, stature wise, he is (or at least was at that time). He does have at least one very attractive daughter though. 

Clearly you don't know that Col. Boddington can kill a man with a hard look and just one of his itty bitty pinkie fingers.

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Sadly all my favorite outdoor writers are gone.

Cooter Brown. Internet scribe.

I’ve read Robert Ruark’s “The Old Man and the Boy” and “The Old Man’s Boy Grows Older” so many times over the years, I could practically recite them from memory.    I have been so moved over

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13 minutes ago, Cooter Brown said:

Clearly you don't know that Col. Boddington can kill a man with a hard look and just one of his itty bitty pinkie fingers.

 

Perhaps, but his writing can't hold a candle to Cooter Brown, Internet Scribe.

 

My comment wasn't meant in any way to belittle the man and I hope it wasn't taken in that manner. It was just having seen him numerous times on tv shows, my impression was he was a much larger man. 

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1 hour ago, Marc Ret said:

My comment wasn't meant in any way to belittle the man and I hope it wasn't taken in that manner.

Hey, pal, that's between you, Boddington, and Al's jealous daughter.

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8 minutes ago, Cooter Brown said:

Hey, pal, that's between you, Boddington, and Al's jealous daughter.

 

Well, according to Al, his daughter only wants a "real man" so I guess that means I only need to concern myself with Boddington...

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5 hours ago, steveziv said:

Hill and Capstick are the only two who jump to mind. Thomas McGuane turns a brilliant phrase from time to time but it can be work getting there.  Honestly I'm a little jaded to outdoor writing. How many times do you need to hear the story about the boy and the old truck and the farmhouse and the gravel road and Uncle Clem's Ithaca and the dead dog?

Capstick's nickname among outdoor writers was "chapstick".  After he finished recounting his own adventures--which were MAYBE his own adventures--he started retelling stories that had been told by hunters/writers who experienced them first hand.  If I want to read about Jim Corbett hunting maneating tigers or leopards in India, or Patterson dealing with the Tsavo lions, I'll go straight to the source and read what Corbett and Patterson had to say.  They both wrote books.  I can remember magazines running Capstick on Corbett or Patterson . . . with a reference to the latest Capstick book which was the source of the article.  Rubbed me the wrong way.  Never mentioned the original.  I finally wrote to Petersen's Hunting complaining about it.  Capstick was retelling Corbett at that time.  And, to credit Petersen's, they finally did begin including references to the originals.

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I've heard the raps on Capstick, and also read Corbett, Patterson, Bell, Hunter, etc.  Some of Capstick's books, most notably Long Grass and Silent Places are excellent, a lot of his later work was not so great and somewhat cliche.  It's been a while but I remember liking Hunter's book a lot and Bell's not so much.  I guess being a great hunter doesn't make you a great writer, and vice versa.

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I wish Datus Proper had written more, a lot more.  Pheasants of the Mind is one of my all time favorites and have read it several times.

 

The only work of Roderick Haig Brown I've read is A River "Never Sleeps, but based on that, I believe he belongs in the pantheon of great fishing writers.  Maybe that's a differnet thread.

 

And I'm surprised no one has mentioned John Madson.  He's not necessarily a favorite, but his essays are great.  I especially love Pheasants Beyond Autumn.  I've read that and some others several times over too.

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5 hours ago, Brad Eden said:

Member Wisconsin aka Ken is making a name for himself. Two upland books published in the last year or two.

 

I considered myself a friend of Ken's for a number of years before I got around to reading any of his stuff. Grabbed his books from the UJ auction and I'm enjoying them immensely!!

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All have been mentioned but for me Gene Hill, Micheal McIntosh, Harry Middleton, and John Barsness who is my current favorite (as in alive) who I wish would write more on Shotguns and bird hunting. I have a few books by him and know he is a dedicated bird hunter. Maybe writers get known for one thing and it is hard for them to get more well known in other areas.  Who knows? 

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Not truly an outdoor writer but Robert Ruark's stories of Africa and hunting are about as good as it gets. Far better reading than the current run of the mill monthly hook and bullet wonks.

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Now that I'm home and can see my books I have  a few others to add;  Robert F. Jones, Ted Lundrigan, Steve Grooms, Vance Bourjaily, Stephen Bodio, Dan O'Brien, Rick Bass and of course Hemingway. 

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This is a pretty thorough listing of the good ones and hard to add to. I'll only add John Holt and a story in the 2017 bird hunting edition of Grays by Christian Oakley. Good stuff here and thanks for the reminders of some I need to find or revisit.

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On 1/29/2019 at 11:21 AM, Marc Ret said:

 

I think we place too much emphasis on physical mass when it comes to handling recoil. I would guess I had 5 inches or so (I'm only 5' 11") and a good 60 lbs (I usually run a fairly solid 215lbs) on him at the time of meeting. I'd wager he can handle a big gun much better than I. Familiarity with how to handle heavy recoil and a proper fitting gun go a long way. 

 

I read somewhere that small people are actually MORE recoil tolerant than big people. I mulled that one over for a while and it actually began to make some sense. 

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