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Favorite Outdoor writers


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Jack O Connor and Pat McManus top the list...but there are several others also already mentioned

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Sadly all my favorite outdoor writers are gone.

Cooter Brown. Internet scribe.

I’ve read Robert Ruark’s “The Old Man and the Boy” and “The Old Man’s Boy Grows Older” so many times over the years, I could practically recite them from memory.    I have been so moved over

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DennisMcFeely

hill

tom word

volk

ford

gaddis

babcock in no particular order.

 

 

if forced to choose one it would absolutely be Guy de la Valdene.

 

.02

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On ‎1‎/‎29‎/‎2019 at 4:01 PM, BirdBrain said:

 

 

And I'm surprised no one has mentioned John Madson.  He's not necessarily a favorite, but his essays are great.  I especially love Pheasants Beyond Autumn.  I've read that and some others several times over too.

That's one of the best pieces on pheasant hunting ever written.

 

Most people know of McIntosh mainly as a shotgun writer.  That's the way I thought of him too . . . until I read "Green Eyes" in the anthology "Come October:  Exclusively Woodcock".  He was very good at fiction too.

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Great thread. Spurred me to find The Best of Nash Buckingham and Jaybirds go to hell on Friday and reread them for the umteenth time. If I could only find Horn of the Hunter, my triple play would be complete. 

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Yeah, this thread is costing me some book money, but it has been exactly what I was looking for. Thanks everyone.

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8 hours ago, Don Steese said:

 

I read somewhere that small people are actually MORE recoil tolerant than big people. I mulled that one over for a while and it actually began to make some sense. 

That might be true. I am pretty skinny 6ft even and 165 pounds, I noticed in my youth (20yrs ago) that during an occasional fight. I would just fly backwards when hit by a big guy, but was too light for much real damage

...bigger guys seem more planted so the force transfers. Oh yeah, landing 5ft away on the ground gives you time to reconsider being in that particular fight..:)

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On ‎1‎/‎29‎/‎2019 at 4:01 PM, BirdBrain said:

And I'm surprised no one has mentioned John Madson.  He's not necessarily a favorite, but his essays are great.  I especially love Pheasants Beyond Autumn.  I've read that and some others several times over too.

Thanks for listing that one, found it in a less than organized form but it seems to be all there.

 

http://muse.jhu.edu/chapter/409247

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All the mentioned and I will add Jim Casada to the list. He is a very good writer on many outdoor topics and I enjoy his monthly email musing.

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My favorites are too numerous to count.  But i think I have most of everything Hill ever wrote, and still find the guy to be an extremely facsinating writer and person.  Another guy that has always interested me is George Reiger.  Hill was one of the post-WWII ivy league writers that the "big 3" outdoor mags seemed to always hire.  And Reiger was (is?) a post-vietnam era writer, who was a Vietnamese interpreter at the Paris peace talks, with a wicked sense of humor and stainless steel opinions. 

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I’ve read Robert Ruark’s “The Old Man and the Boy” and “The Old Man’s Boy Grows Older” so many times over the years, I could practically recite them from memory. 

 

I have been so moved over the years by his personal stories of growing up in the “Old Man’s” house in the early 1900’s, that last year on a winter road trip out of Wisconsin, my wife and I included a stop in Southport, North Carolina, just so I could see the house which still stands today, as does the magnolia tree in the yard the boy wrote about. I could take in the distance the house was from the water where they launched their row boat for duck hunting, peer out at the distant salt marsh where he wrote of those duck hunting trips, look over the sound where he caught all those fish, and drive the countryside where he did so much quail hunting over pointing dogs. It was a real neat experience. What great books those were.

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As a self taught bird chaser I always enjoyed Larry Brown’s advice and book on pheasants. Well done and all some guy from east Texas needed

to better understand those raucous roosters. Babcock is someone whose books and stories about quail hunting and bream fishing in the old South 

i really liked.  McQuarrie’s Old Duck Hunter and tales about “Mr President” of duck hunting are a favorite. Nash Buckinham and tales of ducks and

Bo Whoop are a favorite as well. George Bird Evans and his tales of chasing grouse and woodcock are great. He imho had a real literary talent. 

I cant believe Evans hasn’t been raved about by the grouse chasers. Corey Ford I enjoyed as well. 

 

I never really was was a real enthusiastic big game chaser, except in Germany , and I read The BJV (Bavarian Hunters Society) pubs then, so I never paid

much attention to the Capsticks of this old world.  

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