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WABBIT-SLAYER

2018 Ford F-150 2.7L Turbo V-6

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WABBIT-SLAYER

Anyone have one? If so, what kind of gas mileage are you getting? Any problems with this engine?

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Zkight89

We have a '16 and '17 with this motor. Pulled everything I've ever hooked to them from Aluminum boats to enclosed tool trailers and our camper. Average around 20 mpg and both have around 50,000 miles on them already with no problems yet.

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TTSpringers

Just got one at the end of November.  Getting about 18.5 mpg.  That is winter driving and warming up the vehicle every day for 10 minutes.  only have 3,000 miles on it so far.  Really like the truck and the motor.  

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chilly460

I have 15k miles on a 2017 4x4 Supercab.  I get 19mpg city/hwy, 21mpg if I don't care what speed I drive on the highway, 23mpg if I keep it to 65mph.  No issues so far.  

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dogrunner

Looks like you guys are not getting any better than my 5.0  and that is basically what a guy at work is getting with his 2.7  or worse. Turbo motors are nice until there under powered for what they are trying to move, than the turbos are constantly spinning and the mileage is not that great. 

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Locher

I thought the 2.7 would do better.  I have the 3.5 eco and get 18+ average up and down the mountains in W. Pa.  When I'm on the highway, I'm around 21.  With the factory tires (Goodyear Wrangler Fortitude) I was getting close to 24 on highway.  My all terrain type tires knocked 2+ mpg off what I was getting.  My buddy's 5.0 gets about 1-1.5 mpg less than I get on the same work commute (we carpool).  

 

1 hour ago, dogrunner said:

Turbo motors are nice until there under powered for what they are trying to move, than the turbos are constantly spinning and the mileage is not that great.

 

I agree about the turbos but the same can be said for the trucks that shut off cylinders.  Besides my buddy, I  carpool with 2 other guys.  One guy has a newer GMC (17 or 18)and it displays whether it's in V8 or V4 mode.  The only time he seems to be in V4 mode is when we're going downhill (likewise I imagine my turbos are spinning unless were going downhill).  He's getting mileage similar to the 5.0.  The 3rd guy has a new Ram. Tons of power but not even close to any of the others for mpg.  That 5.7 really sucks it down on the long steep grades we drive. Shutting of 4 cylinders doesn't seem to help much when you're coasting.  They're all good trucks though. I'd take any of them home.  

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dogrunner
On 2/11/2019 at 8:31 PM, Locher said:

I thought the 2.7 would do better.  I have the 3.5 eco and get 18+ average up and down the mountains in W. Pa.  When I'm on the highway, I'm around 21.  With the factory tires (Goodyear Wrangler Fortitude) I was getting close to 24 on highway.  My all terrain type tires knocked 2+ mpg off what I was getting.  My buddy's 5.0 gets about 1-1.5 mpg less than I get on the same work commute (we carpool).  

 

 

I agree about the turbos but the same can be said for the trucks that shut off cylinders.  Besides my buddy, I  carpool with 2 other guys.  One guy has a newer GMC (17 or 18)and it displays whether it's in V8 or V4 mode.  The only time he seems to be in V4 mode is when we're going downhill (likewise I imagine my turbos are spinning unless were going downhill).  He's getting mileage similar to the 5.0.  The 3rd guy has a new Ram. Tons of power but not even close to any of the others for mpg.  That 5.7 really sucks it down on the long steep grades we drive. Shutting of 4 cylinders doesn't seem to help much when you're coasting.  They're all good trucks though. I'd take any of them home.  

So basically the 4 cylinder switch does nothing just sorta a gimmick. My 2018 5.0 gets better than my 16 did because it has the 10 speed trans, it also has more hp and torque. 

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chilly460

The 2018 5.0s went to a dual injection (port and direct) meant to help fuel economy

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WI Outdoor Nut

A few buddies have the 2.7's.  No issues that I know of from any of them.  IMHO, however, they are a great motor in the F150 if you basically use your truck as a commuter vehicle or pull less than 2000#'s on a regular basis.  The 3.5 is just a much better motor for any serious pulling.  My co-worked had the 2.7 and after two years traded for the 3.5 for that reason.  MPG is slightly worse on the 3.5, but the motor is waaaay more capable.  If you don't pull, certainly go for it. 

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River19
1 hour ago, WI Outdoor Nut said:

A few buddies have the 2.7's.  No issues that I know of from any of them.  IMHO, however, they are a great motor in the F150 if you basically use your truck as a commuter vehicle or pull less than 2000#'s on a regular basis.  The 3.5 is just a much better motor for any serious pulling.  My co-worked had the 2.7 and after two years traded for the 3.5 for that reason.  MPG is slightly worse on the 3.5, but the motor is waaaay more capable.  If you don't pull, certainly go for it. 

 


This is the age old good debate on "what is the intended use of the vehicle?"

 

I love how in the "1/2 ton" market there are so many options across manufacturers.  They are all building "good" rigs compared to stuff 10 years ago.  They have all answered the cries from truck forums around the country.  For 10 years people cried for a small displacement diesel option in the 1/2 ton market, for a better V6, for forced induction.  Now there are at least 3 diesels in the 1/2 ton market, multiple very stout normally aspirated V6s with power numbers as strong as or damn close to V8s from 2010ish.  We have outstanding NA V8s over 400Hp at the crank etc.  6sp, 8sp, 10sp transmissions, multiple rear end gearing options, cylinder deactivation, MDS, etc.   So many choices you should be able to find exactly what you want.

 

Amazing stuff.  Down side.......there is now a $97K F-150..... lol.  All this stuff isn't cheap.

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john mcg
21 minutes ago, River19 said:

 


This is the age old good debate on "what is the intended use of the vehicle?"

 

I love how in the "1/2 ton" market there are so many options across manufacturers.  They are all building "good" rigs compared to stuff 10 years ago.  They have all answered the cries from truck forums around the country.  For 10 years people cried for a small displacement diesel option in the 1/2 ton market, for a better V6, for forced induction.  Now there are at least 3 diesels in the 1/2 ton market, multiple very stout normally aspirated V6s with power numbers as strong as or damn close to V8s from 2010ish.  We have outstanding NA V8s over 400Hp at the crank etc.  6sp, 8sp, 10sp transmissions, multiple rear end gearing options, cylinder deactivation, MDS, etc.   So many choices you should be able to find exactly what you want.

 

Amazing stuff.  Down side.......there is now a $97K F-150..... lol.  All this stuff isn't cheap.

Yup, yup and yupper.

As I look around even at not-dead-yet used trucks, the prices are rediculous.

Over the top crazy--IMO.

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25/06
On 2/11/2019 at 5:42 PM, dogrunner said:

Looks like you guys are not getting any better than my 5.0  and that is basically what a guy at work is getting with his 2.7  or worse. Turbo motors are nice until there under powered for what they are trying to move, than the turbos are constantly spinning and the mileage is not that great. 

I think the 5.0 is a great motor, I have no experience with 2.7 but have a 14  that has a 3.5 echo in it.  While the 5.0 and 3.5 have similar HP and torque top numbers at top end,

the difference really shows itself in regular driving, the 3.5 twin turbos have much flatter torque curve and produces much higher torque numbers where you use it

day to day in the 1500-2200 RPM range. This difference is even greater at higher elevations, Naturally aspirated motors really give up power in the mountains. Turbos

gained a well deserved bad reputation in the 80's. Cars were running turbos and carburetors together, the results were dismal. Computers and fuel injection has changed the

game. Proper fuel management and timing has increased hp, mileage all while making vehicles last longer. The days of waiting for an oversized turbo to spool up are long

gone. From most of the negative comments I see here I know most folks have not actually driven one. The 5.0 is still great and either will do a great job.

 

Universally ALL  gas motors have big fuel economy drops when pulling relatively modest loads regardless if they are naturally aspirated or turbo. That is partly why they make diesels, unfortunately the EPA has the diesels so jacked up on the emission side of the equation they are cost prohibitive to keep on the road. We have 12- RAM 2500s in our fleet, 2014-2017 between 25,000 and 100,000+ miles. Once they are off warranty we are having to do a DEF delete and tune as they have chronic issues with the emission systems regardless of miles. If you had to replace the sensors, mufflers and misc. equipment at a dealer when you get warnings or the truck drops into limp mode, you will spend and average of $2,000- $7,000 a year keeping one on the road for an average of 28,000 miles a year NOT counting lost productivity. We do operate in cold weather and this does seem in exacerbate the frequency of emission failures. Fortunately we live in a state that does not perform emission testing, the dealers have told us they will happily buy trucks with emission delete, they actually sell at a premium. Our typical cost for an aftermarket company to perform the delete service is $1795. We do not spend money lightly and no one is interested in aftermarket hot rod work or "increased performance". We simply need the equipment to work every time every day or the lost productivity is unacceptable. We are seeing 2-4mpg on average increase in mileage with the delete under the same driving conditions, which is a nice bonus but we would have still performed the work if we saw a similar decrease in mileage. For us fuel economy is a dollar waiting on a dime when you have a crew or superintendent not at the job site.

 

Gas motors make good sense for private ownership if you can live with the lower performance. If you need the power for pulling you have to go diesel and deal with the

issues forced on us.

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jeff88
4 minutes ago, River19 said:

 


This is the age old good debate on "what is the intended use of the vehicle?"

 

I love how in the "1/2 ton" market there are so many options across manufacturers.  They are all building "good" rigs compared to stuff 10 years ago.  They have all answered the cried from truck forums around the country.  For 10 years people cried for a small displacement diesel option in the 1/2 ton market, for a better V6, for forced induction.  Now there are 3 diesels in the 1/2 ton market, multiple very stout normally aspirated V6s with power numbers as strong as or damn close to V8s from 2010ish.  We have outstanding NA V8s over 400Hp at the crank etc.  6sp, 8sp, 10sp transmissions, multiple rear end gearing options, cylinder deactivation, MDS, etc.   So many choices you should be able to find exactly what you want.

 

Amazing stuff.  Down side.......there is now a $97K F-150..... lol.  All this stuff isn't cheap.

^ Interesting observations ^

 

As we start phasing out the internal combustion engine in the next 20 years or so, it comes at a time when power trains are at their most efficient and effective.  15 years ago with a large v8 and a 4 sp tranny if you got 20 mpg on the highway you were nursing it.  I know, my '04 expy 4wd would get a measured 18.5 mpg on it's best days w/o a trailer on back.  Only once did it get a measured 20+ mpg, on I-55 from Memphis going North to Chicago for one tank.  It had below 300 HP, probably 260 - 280 if I recall correctly from a 5.4L engine.  Around town, 12 - 13 mpg.  Combined it was around 15 - 16.  

 

A friend of mine called the Ford Ecoboost an either/or proposition:  Either really powerful or really economical but don't expect both.  He went with a Tundra.  Based on what I read above, looks like some are doing just fine with the 2.7 and 3.5 eco-boosted mills.

 

Per your $97K comment, this from my favorite auto reviewer on an f150, thought it pretty interesting and funny:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/why-the-ford-f-150-supercrew-limited-sparks-joy-11549572040?shareToken=st098ee19e446e416f9fdefb29d717b5df&ref=article_email_share

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chilly460
3 hours ago, WI Outdoor Nut said:

A few buddies have the 2.7's.  No issues that I know of from any of them.  IMHO, however, they are a great motor in the F150 if you basically use your truck as a commuter vehicle or pull less than 2000#'s on a regular basis.  The 3.5 is just a much better motor for any serious pulling.  My co-worked had the 2.7 and after two years traded for the 3.5 for that reason.  MPG is slightly worse on the 3.5, but the motor is waaaay more capable.  If you don't pull, certainly go for it. 

I pulled a '63 Mercury on a car trailer from Va to mountains of Georgia, and Va to northern PA with my 2.7L, 6000lb or so.  No doubt a 3.5 is better, but I've had a 2001 Lightning 5.4L supercharged, 2004 5.4L F150, 2009 5.3L Silverado, 93 Lightning 5.8L Supercharged....and the 2.7L is a better towing motor than all of them.  Saying it is not appropriate for towing > 2000lb is not at all something I'd agree with.  

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bigjohnsd

From the 2019 Ford Towing Guide

 

Engine HP @ rpm           Torque @ rpm                                     Towing (lbs.)                Payload (lbs.)

3.3L Ti-VCT V6                290 @ 6,500 265 lb.-ft. @ 4,000         7,700                                 1,990

2.7L EcoBoost V6           325 @ 5,000 400 lb.-ft. @ 2,750      9,000                                 2,470

3.5L EcoBoost V6           375 @ 5,000 470 lb.-ft. @ 3,500      13,200                                  3,230

5.0L Ti-VCT V8                395 @ 5,750 400 lb.-ft. @ 4,500      11,500                                   3,270

3.0L Turbo Diesel V6     250 @ 3,250 440 lb.-ft. @ 1,750       11,500                                   2,020

3.5L EcoBoost H.O. V6  450 @ 5,000 510 lb.-ft. @ 3,500        8,000(1)/11,100(2)            1,200(1)/1,530(2)

(1) Raptor only. (2) Limited only

 

2019 Ford Towing Guide

Edited by bigjohnsd
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