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CAN TURKEYS BE HUNTED WITH A .410?

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mccuha
7 hours ago, GLS said:

40 years ago, the 10 ga. was the rage.  The GMC Jimmy was new at the time this photo was taken.  My buddy has the Mag 10; my double is Spanish.  Both are 10 gauge.   They shot some wicked loads.  The 10 gauge loads of that generation were no more potent than what I can now shoot out of my 20 gauge.

 

Here's the long and the short of it in the second photo of my current turkey arsenal.  (I also have the Ithaca 20 ga. TurkeySlayer and a Super Bantam 20 ga.)  No more 12 gauges for me with turkeys.  A blast from the past is on top.  Ithaca NID 10 ga. 3.5".  I bought it over 40 years ago, sold it about 25 years ago and got it back in a trade 5 years ago with the man I sold it to.  11 lbs., 1 oz. unloaded.

Middle gun is my 20 ga. Baikal MP18.  5 lbs., 7 oz.

Bottom is my .410 Yildiz TK36, 3 lbs., 4 oz.

 

Gil

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I had a Jimmy just like that in high school.  Guzzled gas but was like a tank that could go any where.  I sure do wish I still had it

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uplandnut30

Would not be my first choice but don't see why it can't be done.

 

Turkey hunting is a ton of fun.  It's a welcome change of pace when there hasn't been any hunting for awhile.  Plus it's prime arrowhead finding season.  I can call for a bit, then walk the fields for points...call for a bit, walk the creek beds for points, rince and repeat.  

 

My only problem...I don't really enjoy wild turkey meat.  It's really tough.

IMG_0060.JPG

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Brad Eden

Anybody who has hefted a big old turkey or even an average hen can feel the armor plated feathering. There is a reason they are traditionally shot in the head and neck area with a shotgun, any shotgun. It assures a clean and quick kill and not a winged and wounded bird. It also ensures that the meat isn't damaged. They can be shot on the wing, I've done it in the fall, and with a small gauge shotgun and field load 8's or high brass 7.5's. More out of instinct to my Springers flush. They are a lumbering beast upon flush and I was able to get in front and hit the head. I don't recommend wingshooting turkeys. Shoot them on the ground, in the head, after calling them in. If you've never done it, you should try it.

 

IMG_0043.JPG

 

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Virgil Kane
7 hours ago, uplandnut30 said:

Would not be my first choice but don't see why it can't be done.

 

Turkey hunting is a ton of fun.  It's a welcome change of pace when there hasn't been any hunting for awhile.  Plus it's prime arrowhead finding season.  I can call for a bit, then walk the fields for points...call for a bit, walk the creek beds for points, rince and repeat.  

 

My only problem...I don't really enjoy wild turkey meat.  It's really tough.

IMG_0060.JPG

 

 

Nice finds !  Makes me jealous, I've looked for over 60 years for arrow heads and have never found a one.

That is a heck of a collection you got there.

 

Virgil

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Brad Eden
8 hours ago, uplandnut30 said:

My only problem...I don't really enjoy wild turkey meat.  It's really tough.

 

 I've heard this before. And I do agree that the dark meat legs and thighs are tough and not your greasy tender store bought dark meat. Much like ruffed grouse because they are ground birds and travel miles on their feet every day. I admit to discarding those on occasion, but generally keep them and boil down in soups, etc.

 

I personally don't find the white breast meat tough. I think it's how you cook it. We keep one or two wild turkeys every year whole or breast on bone and bake like a regular turkey, but we cover or wrap in bacon and bake low and slllllooooowwwww. Or we cut breasts into turkey fingers, bread and fry. I don't have a deep fryer but have had wild turkey that way and it's likely the best way. We also smoke a breast on bone wild turkey and a breast or two after brining or adding a dry rub. Seriously good. One of our favorite ways of eating wild turkey is I grind the breasts and we make turkey burgers or add it to any dish like you would store bought ground turkey. There is almost no difference in taste.

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SelbyLowndes
7 hours ago, uplandnut30 said:

Would not be my first choice but don't see why it can't be done.

 

Turkey hunting is a ton of fun.  It's a welcome change of pace when there hasn't been any hunting for awhile.  Plus it's prime arrowhead finding season.  I can call for a bit, then walk the fields for points...call for a bit, walk the creek beds for points, rince and repeat.  

 

My only problem...I don't really enjoy wild turkey meat.  It's really tough.

IMG_0060.JPG

 

Nice points and a nice variation in form. Most of mine are field finds, but I have snorkled the river shoals and found a few there.  Creek walking sounds like texas or oklahoma,,,SelbyLowndes

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uplandnut30
1 hour ago, Brad Eden said:

 I've heard this before. And I do agree that the dark meat legs and thighs are tough and not your greasy tender store bought dark meat. Much like ruffed grouse because they are ground birds and travel miles on their feet every day. I admit to discarding those on occasion, but generally keep them and boil down in soups, etc.

 

I personally don't find the white breast meat tough. I think it's how you cook it. We keep one or two wild turkeys every year whole or breast on bone and bake like a regular turkey, but we cover or wrap in bacon and bake low and slllllooooowwwww. Or we cut breasts into turkey fingers, bread and fry. I don't have a deep fryer but have had wild turkey that way and it's likely the best way. We also smoke a breast on bone wild turkey and a breast or two after brining or adding a dry rub. Seriously good. One of our favorite ways of eating wild turkey is I grind the breasts and we make turkey burgers or add it to any dish like you would store bought ground turkey. There is almost no difference in taste.

I'll give the burger a try for sure.  

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uplandnut30
59 minutes ago, SelbyLowndes said:

 

Nice points and a nice variation in form. Most of mine are field finds, but I have snorkled the river shoals and found a few there.  Creek walking sounds like texas or oklahoma,,,SelbyLowndes

There's about 15 different states in that picture.  Mostly field finds but I'd say about a 3rd were dry creek finds.  Snorkeling would be a fun method.

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homelessadam

TSS 9 weighs 1.2 grains 

lead 4 weighs 3.3 grains 

 

There’s still no replacement for displacement. 

 

I use a 20 gauge for turkeys and I’ve not used tss but I’ve used pretty much everything from steel to federal heavyweight and I always go back to lead 5’s. 

 

A turkeys head is pretty easy to penetrate and a lot of holes in paper look cool but I think big holes kill faster when the shot isn’t perfect. 

 

 

 

 

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Brad Eden

20 gauge. HeviShot turkey choke tube. HeviShot 3" Magnum Blend (5, 6, 7 shot). Had good results with HeviShot 5's and the Blend is likely a gimmick, but it works. Since going with this combo I rarely pick up the 12 gauge Turkey dedicated shotgun. For me it's not an exercise in how far I can kill a turkey, and with the 20 gauge HeviShot that's a long way. The vast majority of my Spring gobblers are killed within 30 yards, many under 20 yards. But if I've put in the time and effort and a bird only gives me a shot opportunity that is a ways out there ,I'm glad I can take it. It's up to the hunter how close he wants to kill a bird, not the shotgun. IMO, etc.

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tut

I've been pretty lucky in that I've only body shoot 2 turkey's that I can recall in my life.  One was because of a broken rear sight which really messed me up when it came time to kill the bird.  The other time I was just too excited and when the bird came around a cedar bush I thought he was about to spook and body shot him because I couldn't see the head.  In both cases I'd say 75% of the meat was ruined in both birds because I was shooting a 12 gauge with size 5's and the birds were both about 20 yards away.  Not a good thing at all.   

 

FWIW,   My favorite way to fix them is Turkey Fajitas.  The secret to them is for goodness sakes don't overcook the meat.  They can go from perfect to turkey jerkey in about 1 minute extra time in the frying pan.   If you think they a shade under done, that's the time to get them out of the pan and let them rest.   Then throw the veggies (onions/peppers) in the same skillet with the Fajita seasoning and saute under high heat for 4 or 5 minutes and then throw the turkey meat back in and pull it off the stove and cover it.   Mix up a batch of Pico along with some nicely heated flour tortillas and a dash of sour cream and have at it.   Truly an exceptional meal and if we are on a turkey trip, that's what we do with the first bird we shoot.  

 

PS.  I use this sauce because its easy.  No one has ever complained about eating fresh Turkey Fajita's in camp, washed down with a cold Corona with some black beans on the side.

 

 

 

 

HG0504381.jpg

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GLS

I used to smoke a whole, plucked turkey (scalded with hot water), but the legs were tougher than an old baseball glove.  Now, I filet the breasts for various recipes and slow cook legs and thighs and strip the meat from bone and those plentiful ligaments.  I use the dark meat for chili and combined with white meat in pot pies.   First pot pie I made was with chanterelles for Thanksgiving 2016.  It got rave reviews.  The chants were harvested in the summer, sauteed in butter and olive oil and vacuum bagged for the freezer.  Photo doesn't show off the chants, but they are in there.  A half-pound of them.  Turkey was 2016  spring bird.  I've done it several times since then, but without the chants.  However, it is hard to beat fried anything and turkey nuggets fried in peanut oil heated to 375 after being rolled in a flour seasoning is drool-worthy.  Gil

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MAArcher

Nothing beats a nice wild turkey pot pie with field garlic, peas and carrots.  Mmmm. 

Jake Turkey Pot Pie 2014.JPG

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WMassGriff

Legs and thighs into the crockpot and used in Enchiladas or White Chili. Filleted breasts are cooked various ways in the oven to keep them moist. All good!

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bobman
16 hours ago, lee sykes said:

I have always thought it might be fun to use a traditional muzzleloader. A .45 or .50 cal. Round ball through the wing butt should anchor one pretty well.   I have an aversion to shooting a bird on the ground with a shotgun for some reason.  I know it's a safety issue but probably not so much where I live.  Just not legal. 

 

Its legal in Georgia 

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