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Appalachian turkey dogs


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Watched an old espn gundog clip the other day, it featured the Appalachian turkey dog.First time I'd ever heard of such a breed .Found it quite comical that a gundog would be "bagged" and then released after a turkey was shot to retrieve it, but hey, what do I know about turkey hunting(on my bucket list though).Nice hunting companion, but are the dogs more versatile than this?Anyone have/hunt with them?

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That's a real dilemma in Alabama. What's interesting is the opposite is true way the heck up here in Maine. That article keys in on loss of ideal habitat as a contributing factor in the decline of wil

Boykins were originally used as turkey dogs. Just saying, the little bastards can do everything except calm down until they are three!

You can hunt turkeys with dogs in Ky. But it seems I am by myself in the way I hunt them . We dont scatter the flock, instead the dogs run up to them so quick the turkeys squat just like pheasant or q

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I didn't know there was a particular turkey hunting dog breed. But it's a tradition in the south to scatter Fall wild turkeys using a dog, set up at the center of scatter, bag or cover the dog and wait and/or lost hen call. The turkeys naturally want to group back up and will come back to gather and to the gun. If all goes as planned. 

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Redwing, first the dog breaks up and scatters the flock. Then the dog is bagged while the hunter calls the birds back in. I thought the dogs were usually  curs or feists and also used for squirrels, etc. Hopefully the Appalachian hunters on here add their knowledge.

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mister grouse

It is a "traditional" fall method.  Really the Va, Pa and NY areas are about the only areas where it is still legal I believe.  

 

The common mix breed for the dog fall hunting today is a setter or pointer mix with another breed .

 

Given the dropping turkey populations in many areas of appalachia it is perhaps ikely the fall hen seasons, dog or otherwise,  are soon to be things of the past.

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Treerooster

I have a friend in Wis that has a turkey pretty good dog. He uses a Vizsla. The dog is mainly a turkey dog but it also upland bird hunts and points those birds. Ruffed grouse, woodcock, quail and pheasants are birds that the dog has hunted that I know of.

 

A dog is much better and getting a good break (scattering the turkeys in different directions) than any human could be. If you don't scatter the turkeys in different directions they just regroup somewhere else. Its best if the dog barks when he is scattering a flock, that way you know he busted them.

 

I think a lot of dogs could be turkey dogs if one takes the time to train it. It does take a dog that can sit still tho. I have a Pudelpointer that could be a turkey dog, but I just don't hunt turkeys that hard in the fall.

 

My friend does not use a bag, just has his Vizsla lie down next to him. Using a dog to hunt turkeys in the fall is legal in many states. Off the top of my head I know CO, NE, WI its legal. I believe the number of states where it is legal to use a dog for fall turkey hunting is in the 30's.

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4 hours ago, Treerooster said:

I think a lot of dogs could be turkey dogs if one takes the time to train it.

 

It always surprised the heck out of me, but my GSP's point turkey's a few times each fall.  It's always exciting when you're expecting a grouse or woodcock and great, big turkey (or several) comes busting out.

 

I had a case last fall where the girls cut a scent.  They worked them down to the edge of a bog area where there was a small patch of spruce.  That's where they locked up.  I walked down there and got in position...then sent the girls in.  3 of them flushed out...all poults.  It's nice that you don't need to apply for a fall kill permit anymore...you just get one.  

 

Anyone else have this sort of thing happen? 

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Yes, last fall in NE Minnesota. I was grouse hunting and walked up a point only to have a turkey fly right at me. I've heard they have been moving north but I surely wasn't expecting to see one.

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Ky setter man

You can hunt turkeys with dogs in Ky. But it seems I am by myself in the way I hunt them . We dont scatter the flock, instead the dogs run up to them so quick the turkeys squat just like pheasant or quail. We walk in and shoot off of points. Hell of a lot of fun. Especially watching the dogs try to retrieve it. Lol

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6 hours ago, mister grouse said:

It is a "traditional" fall method.  Really the Va, Pa and NY areas are about the only areas where it is still legal I believe.  

 

The common mix breed for the dog fall hunting today is a setter or pointer mix with another breed .

 

Given the dropping turkey populations in many areas of appalachia it is perhaps ikely the fall hen seasons, dog or otherwise,  are soon to be things of the past.

You can hunt them with a dog in Ohio's fall season. Our bird numbers continue to grow. They are really putting on a show with this good weather.

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Treerooster
2 hours ago, Kre said:

 

It always surprised the heck out of me, but my GSP's point turkey's a few times each fall.  It's always exciting when you're expecting a grouse or woodcock and great, big turkey (or several) comes busting out.

 

I had a case last fall where the girls cut a scent.  They worked them down to the edge of a bog area where there was a small patch of spruce.  That's where they locked up.  I walked down there and got in position...then sent the girls in.  3 of them flushed out...all poults.  It's nice that you don't need to apply for a fall kill permit anymore...you just get one.  

 

Anyone else have this sort of thing happen? 

 

I have had my dogs point turkeys several times while upland bird hunting. Yeah it does surprise me when a big old turkey gets up when I thought it might be a quail or something. Never had a turkey point in Wis but have had several in Colorado. Trouble is in CO the turkey season is closed by the time upland opens.

 

My PP loves turkeys. He will start to bark whenever he hits hot turkey scent and continue the bark when he busts the flock. He is steady on other upland birds, but turkeys he busts big time...has a bunch of fun doing it too. PP's as a breed have a reputation for giving voice. When mine points a grouse or a quail and I miss, he will then bark while going after the bird. He will always swing back by me and barks at me a couple of times...I think he is yelling at me for missing as they don't sound like barks of encouragement.

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homelessadam

It can be a lot of fun and if you get a good break you can hear a lot of turkey calling.

 

The Boykin is the only breed,bred for turkey hunting as far as I know.

 

Mixes of all sorts have been used successfully of course.  

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Appalachian turkey dogs are from a pointer/setter/Plott-hound.  https://www.outdoorlife.com/blogs/strut-zone/2012/09/john-byrne-dog-man

 

I saw a show or video's some years back about the Appalachian Turkey Dogs. 

 

My Draht Wes loves to bust up a flock.  I have one of those pop up dog blinds for duck hunting, I was thinking of trying to use that this fall to turkey hunt.  Let him bust up the flock and then see if I can get him to sit quietly in the blind long enough for me to call them back in.

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Well, what do you know: http://www.turkeydog.org/

 

I like their t-shirts and sweatshirts!  Always wondered about fall turkey with the dog.  Gonna have to give it a go.  She'll need a good orange vest since I hunt turkey during big game archery season!

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I've tried scattering in fall but I can't run fast enough. They all laugh at me and run in one direction. Despite thoughts otherwise, wild turkeys will come to a call, not gobbling but out of curiosity. Cash flushes turkeys each fall, and Ive taken advantage of that. It's pretty funny seeing him carry or should I say drag one to me. I actually shot a Grouse right after this photo with a turkey and Woodcock was taken. 

 

image.jpeg

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