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Brad Eden

Official 2019 Garden Thread

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Alaskan Swamp Collie

Raised beds are the only way to go here. The beans, peas and carrots are popping out in the covered boxes. Tomatoes and peppers can only be grown in greenhouses, that said I start the seeds on March 1 and now have blossoms. My haspcaps are blossoming well and if we don't get hail we should have a good harvest. Still hoping if all those Siberian cherry trees I planted 4 years ago are going to finally blossom and produce a crop. Nothing on the apple trees yet. I think my asparagus experiment went south as no growth has shown up yet this spring.

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Brad Eden
9 hours ago, Mike da Carpenter said:

We are simple when it comes to gardens.  Today, we planted pickling cucumbers, Gypsy peppers, green bush & wax pole beans and just for grins we decided to plant 4 stalks of sweet corn just because it was $1.69 to see what happens.  

 

Our tomatoes last year were awful at best so we opted to skip tomatoes all together as they are relatively cheap at the market or already canned at the store.  The beans are a new addition, and we are looking forward to see how they produce.  The corn is probably not going to last as the GSP has obviously found an attraction to the growing stalks.

 

We bought everything already started as growing from seed has lost its appeal as we age.

 

I use to grow several large blocks of sweet corn of a couple different varieties at the old place with an in ground garden. If the coons didn't get to it first we enjoyed some seriously good corn. I'd get a pot boiling, run up to garden, pick some ears and shuck it right there, head back to house and boil it up. No loss of sugar whatsoever. My understanding is you need a good amount of corn rows or blocks for proper polination. Good luck. I tried sweet corn in 4x8 raised beds at this new place and the results were dismal. No more.

 

Maine is likely similar to Michigan as far as growing vegetable. Here are a couple tricks to try if you ever do tomatos again. Run a furrow through garden about 5-6" deep. Pull off all the leaves from the transplants and leave the cluster at top. Lie the plants in the furrow lengthwise and cover, just angle the top cluster of leaves above the soil. The plant will still grow straight up. This way the root ball isn't buried deep in cold soil, and roots form all along that buried stem. Seems to help a lot.

 

Another trick, if you are waiting and waiting for green tomatoes to turn red. Take a shovel or spade and dig down in a circle around the plant about a foot down and about 6-8" from the stem. This severs a lot of the root system and doesn't  kill the plant but prompts the plant to ripen its fruit. 

 

I also use to start most all my own vegetables in some old greenhouses or under grow lights. Got tired of that too, and buy my transplants nowadays. But times have changed and you can buy simple and inexpensive portable type greenhouses with shelves and everything now. I might try that at some point.  

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Korthaar
On 5/20/2019 at 7:22 AM, Brad Eden said:

I like the relative ease of raised beds. (Only real choice at this new to us place with gravel ground) but miss the huge open ground and tilled garden at old place. I had large blocks of different corn varieties and pumpkin patches. I just don't have much luck with corn and pumpkins in raised beds.

Corn and pumpkins need a fair sized plot to be successful. Isn't corn pollinated by wind?  I tried it once in a bed with few resulting ears.  Kale, spinach, onions and some varieties of lettuce are surprisingly frosty tolerant. I can get mine in mid March here in Ohio without concern. This recent hot spell is pushing my salad greens to bolt already.

20190526_122510.jpg

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Brad Eden

IMG_1084.JPG

 

Garden area looking from upstairs window. The two 4x8 beds in very back are strawberry dedicated. I have to put bird mesh over them once they fruit or the birds peck and eat the berries. The cold frame on upper right that I built for fall greens last year is being used as a greenhouse of sorts for a bunch of transplants I've yet to plant. After that it will be placed over a bed that has heat loving stuff like cukes or squashes. The other plastic covered frame on left is an A-frame I built yesterday that I'll use to help things get off to a good start in a typically cool early summer in Maine. I have all the beds prepped except the one that has tools lying in it. I'll cover a couple more beds in black plastic, and all transplants will go in those. The black plastic although not aesthetically pleasing has proven to be a game changer for these raised beds that don't get full sun all day,  The small bed on far right is for herbs like Basil, chives, etc. The new unfilled 2.5x8 beds on left may get tomatoes or something, not sure. I'm still waiting for my guy to drop off a couple/few yards of compost/loam mix. 

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fishvik

Got my spuds, maters, peppers and zukes planted and fertilized just before it started raining. No frost so things should be good.

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gwponr

my raised beds

IMG_2102_zpsfdw2rvge.jpg

peppers and watermelons   watermelons have sprouted peppers have been in the ground over a month and are growing very little not enough sun yet. the peppers and melons are in a new area that I tilled and amended its about 350sf   I dug up dirt in a couple of different spots and took it to the organic garden store. They tested the soil and gave me the recommendations for amendments  I tilled it in let it sit for two weeks then rototiller again a week later I started planting. the Placero tomato on the left went into the ground a week prior to the peppers

IMG_2099_zpszjivnbhd.jpg

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WPG Gizmo

Planted the garden yesterday I dont have any space so we did a raised bed in the front yard where it gets all the sun we have Squash,  Red Peppers, Tomatoes, Herbs and some Corn.  All the Vegis were started over a month ago Paulas father has a greenhouse and about 15 raised beds in his back yard. 

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GB Jack
On 5/20/2019 at 6:22 AM, Brad Eden said:

I like the relative ease of raised beds. (Only real choice at this new to us place with gravel ground) but miss the huge open ground and tilled garden at old place. I had large blocks of different corn varieties and pumpkin patches. I just don't have much luck with corn and pumpkins in raised beds.

They have made me garden again ! 

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GB Jack
1 hour ago, Brad Eden said:

IMG_1084.JPG

 

Garden area looking from upstairs window. The two 4x8 beds in very back are strawberry dedicated. I have to put bird mesh over them once they fruit or the birds peck and eat the berries. The cold frame on upper right that I built for fall greens last year is being used as a greenhouse of sorts for a bunch of transplants I've yet to plant. After that it will be placed over a bed that has heat loving stuff like cukes or squashes. The other plastic covered frame on left is an A-frame I built yesterday that I'll use to help things get off to a good start in a typically cool early summer in Maine. I have all the beds prepped except the one that has tools lying in it. I'll cover a couple more beds in black plastic, and all transplants will go in those. The black plastic although not aesthetically pleasing has proven to be a game changer for these raised beds that don't get full sun all day,  The small bed on far right is for herbs like Basil, chives, etc. The new unfilled 2.5x8 beds on left may get tomatoes or something, not sure. I'm still waiting for my guy to drop off a couple/few yards of compost/loam mix. 

This gives me a garden boner 

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Korthaar
2 hours ago, WPG Gizmo said:

Planted the garden yesterday I dont have any space so we did a raised bed in the front yard where it gets all the sun we have Squash,  Red Peppers, Tomatoes, Herbs and some Corn.  All the Vegis were started over a month ago Paulas father has a greenhouse and about 15 raised beds in his back yard. 

If you're short on space, I'd recommend the book "The Square Foot Gardener".  While I don't follow it religiously, I've found it practical and very useful. 

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WPG Gizmo

Not short on space as we dont really put up a big garden Paula's father grows enough to feed a army I went a little larger this year so she could get some peppers and such and I wanted to try some corn.  My raised bed is 4 feet by 12 feet which is just about what I wanted.

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nutmeg grouser

Mine garden has been finalized and in for a week. Seeds and transplants. 5 type of peppers, cukes,squash, eggplant broccoli,cauliflower, brussel sprouts, beans,peas, 3 varieties of tomatoes and a small patch of sweet corn for the first time.  Blueberry plants and apple tress are loaded with flowers. 

On a side note. I usually line the bottom of my plant "wells" with lawn clippings but this year I treated the lawn so I won't use them. I trimmed a few live maple tree branches today and got to thinking about stripping the leaves off of the branches, mince them up with a weed whacker in a barrel and use it as a plant mulch? Anyone ever do that? Thoughts?

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Brad Eden
7 hours ago, nutmeg grouser said:

.... 

On a side note. I usually line the bottom of my plant "wells" with lawn clippings but this year I treated the lawn so I won't use them. I trimmed a few live maple tree branches today and got to thinking about stripping the leaves off of the branches, mince them up with a weed whacker in a barrel and use it as a plant mulch? Anyone ever do that? Thoughts?

Not a bad idea to chop up the leaves. When I had in ground gardens at the old place I would spread leaves (and compost I had developed) and till it in with a Troybilt rear tine tiller. That seemed to break it up pretty good. Adding any organic matter to garden soil is a very good thing. Its harder with these raised beds, but Illl probably mix in some compost I have cooking in the new beds.

 

Oh, I sowed a bed of 2 types of spinach and several lettuce varieties yesterday. 

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salmontogue
15 hours ago, GB Jack said:

This gives me a garden boner 

 

Gardening gives me a negative boner.

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GB Jack
3 hours ago, salmontogue said:

 

Gardening gives me a negative boner.

Then you’re doing it wrong 

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