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Guy de la Valdene article


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1 hour ago, Larry Brown said:

Found the passage I was thinking of in "Making Game".  It does indeed refer to a "practicing witch", including a most unflattering description and a reference to her being  "the  mother of four mongoloids".  But the previous page makes another reference Michiganders in particular might not appreciate:

 

"South of Traverse City, where we often hunt, the land is poor and the inhabitants poorer.  Rampant unemployment, alcoholism and a certain inbreeding have left in their wake a brutish demeanor in the carriage of men."

 

The same section also contains the following lines:  "Americans are people born with cap guns strapped to their legs.  They are shooters, unfortunately of a kind whose undeniable rights have also won them the dubious honor of killing each other at a rate one hundred times that of their closest rival."

 

He does, however, go on to suggest that Americans are the best natural shooters, even though they use "for the most part an ungainly, gas-operated automatic that bears all the charm and balance of a ratchet".  He compares that to shooting fitted guns in Europe . . . but he does admit that the American "shoots better than his French counterpart, who by nature is not very coordinated."  And he doesn't have very kind things to say about Parkers or Smiths or Foxes in comparison to British bests.

 

Result:  There are undoubtedly those who will find reason to take offense at some of the things he's written.

 

 

 

That's the book, and likely the right section of it.  Building himself up by berating others is at the core of it, the kind of dreck you won't find in the writing of Hill, Smith, Waterman, Spiller, or a host of others lining our bookshelves--so why make room for his?  That's only me, and my take on it, the balance of what he writes has to retain an audience willing to ignore the bad (as I perceive it) since he has obviously sold more than a few copies.  Shotgun comparisons are pretty much required chapters, lots of room for prejudices there and I expect to find biases based as much on fact as non-fact and again it can be done without condescension by most writers.  Not all, and for the most part it's amusement when taken very far which I believe is often intentionally tongue-in-cheek.

 

Many years ago I broke my favorite ratchet and was devastated to find they no longer made it with that particular handle.  It was a sad day, and I make do with a variety to handle the situations that were once covered by that singular piece.  Some people do that with shotguns, I suppose.

 

 

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In the realm of modern outdoor (upland) writing, there is Guy deLaValdene and Mike McIntosh and everyone else,  as they are erudite and educative. Many of the other praised and lionized writers will n

Which brings me to my absolute favorite book on grouse and woodcock:  Hill and Smith's "The Whispering Wings of Autumn", written for the Ruffed Grouse Society back in 1981.

Not all! Some of them spend the winters in Arizona with me!!   I received the woodcock book as a gift. Found it quite engaging. There's probably some truth to his take on our love affair wit

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Larry Brown

Which brings me to my absolute favorite book on grouse and woodcock:  Hill and Smith's "The Whispering Wings of Autumn", written for the Ruffed Grouse Society back in 1981.

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DennisMcFeely
22 hours ago, Larry Brown said:

Which brings me to my absolute favorite book on grouse and woodcock:  Hill and Smith's "The Whispering Wings of Autumn", written for the Ruffed Grouse Society back in 1981.

 

All of Hill's stories very enjoyable in this book interspersed with stories from Steve Smith.

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Dave in Maine

Something, something, French gun, … , something something.

 

Of course, my favorite 16 sxs, and possibly my favorite shotgun overall, is a svelte little French 16 strikingly well-proportioned, weighing only 5 lb 8 oz., handles like a dream, and reminds me of a jeune Parisienne, runway model.  Most important, it hits where I point it.

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Larry Brown
46 minutes ago, Dave in Maine said:

Something, something, French gun, … , something something.

 

Of course, my favorite 16 sxs, and possibly my favorite shotgun overall, is a svelte little French 16 strikingly well-proportioned, weighing only 5 lb 8 oz., handles like a dream, and reminds me of a jeune Parisienne, runway model.  Most important, it hits where I point it.

But does it shave armpits and legs?? :)

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Well since we are expressing opinion on popular Upland writers....I don't like reading Gene Hill. There, I said it.  What a relief. I will pass in my Upland card now. My apologies.

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2 hours ago, DennisMcFeely said:

 

All of Hill's stories very enjoyable in this book interspersed with stories from Steve Smith.

and they are pretty hard to tell apart.  Once discussed this with the late, Michael McIntosh.  Actually he brought up the similarity of their styles and having practically memorized the book,  years before, I did recall having to look to see which one wrote each story.  He admired both men a lot. 

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Funny thing is, as I have mentioned multiple times  before. Steve Smith is one of my favorite writers. And that I wish he would edit less and write and publish more. 

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On 7/1/2019 at 8:33 AM, C.J.L. said:

 

All those folks now live in Florida so it's cool.  

This would be funnier if the truth didn't hurt so bad....

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1 hour ago, Brad Eden said:

Well since we are expressing opinion on popular Upland writers....I don't like reading Gene Hill. There, I said it.  What a relief. I will pass in my Upland card now. My apologies.

 

Can you say why that is?  

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1 hour ago, Brad Eden said:

Funny thing is, as I have mentioned multiple times  before. Steve Smith is one of my favorite writers. And that I wish he would edit less and write and publish more. 

Funny thing alright.  Whenever Hill would hit a wall he'd send the piece to Smith, and Smith would complete it.  No matter to me cause I like both of them.  I think I have most if not everything the two of them wrote.  

When the PDJ board was active, and Smith a frequent participant, it was pure gold.  And another thing, Smith replies to every email and PM I ever sent him.  I regret never corresponding with Hill.   

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sharptail grouse
On 6/29/2019 at 5:59 PM, DennisMcFeely said:

There’s a short article on him in the current issue of Covey Rise magazine for anyone who may be interested 

Is there a link?

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54 minutes ago, 1971snipe said:

No matter to me cause I like both of them.  I think I have most if not everything the two of them wrote.  

 

Forgive me if I've asked before, but do you have Hill's essay titled "As was the father, so is the child" from Seasons of the Angler? It's a bit different, I don't recall seeing it elsewhere.

 

I buy copies of Hill's Tears and Laughter and give them to non-hunters I suspect of feeling similarly about their dogs as I do about mine.  Some like the stories, even the sad ones.

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4 minutes ago, kgb said:

 

Forgive me if I've asked before, but do you have Hill's essay titled "As was the father, so is the child" from Seasons of the Angler? It's a bit different, I don't recall seeing it elsewhere.

 

I buy copies of Hill's Tears and Laughter and give them to non-hunters I suspect of feeling similarly about their dogs as I do about mine.  Some like the stories, even the sad ones.

Yes, I think I very likely bought my copy of Seasons solely for that piece.  It seemed a bit different story line for him, I agree.   

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8 minutes ago, 1971snipe said:

Yes, I think I very likely bought my copy of Seasons solely for that piece.  It seemed a bit different story line for him, I agree.   

 

I picked up a copy of Seasons of the Hunter for the same reason, lucked out as it was a library kill.

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