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mnpheas

Where would you live

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Chukarman

Come on, Doug... Idaho is few native-born residents. California used to be a paradise... until it experienced 500% population growth. Now the overflow is spreading out into other western states. I'm a native California fugitive myself.

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dgfavor

Nope...no appeals...building a wall...born and raised in Hells Canyon...couldn't walk on level ground till my late 20's

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Fishnfowler

WA, OR, ID, MT, NV, NE, SD, ND, CO are all good.  Each has some particular attractions and detriments.  I've said this before, each area has its secrets, take the time to learn them and the hunting can be superfluous.

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GSPpurist

I found my perfect spot.  Far enough from everything busy but near enough to still get 2 days shipping from Amazon. 

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Reeba
7 hours ago, Chukarman said:

Come on, Doug... Idaho is few native-born residents. California used to be a paradise... until it experienced 500% population growth. Now the overflow is spreading out into other western states. I'm a native California fugitive myself.

Our cousin's husband is a multi generation Colorado resident.  With the influx there, he has a license plate that says Colorado native.  I always jokingly comment "i never knew you were native American."

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Brad Eden

I'll add that in my perfect world I would live in Maine from May through December, which would cover spring wild turkey season, Upland bird and deer seasons, and in the southwest, likely New Mexico, from January through April. 

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Tim Frazier

Where I live now would be acceptable if some of the dramatic changes of the past 20 years hadn't taken place.  The creek that I grew up in, full of mussels, crayfish, small mouth, (dozens of fish species actually), wood ducks, beaver, otters and so on has turned into an ag creek with run off and new homes many miles upstream.  This year flooding that used to be every other year or every 5 years happened 6 times in the first 6 months of the year.  Probably lost 1/4 acre of land and silt and sand everywhere.  I haven't seen a live clam in over 5 years.  Still, it's home and NE Ohio is central enough we can get to some pretty cool places in an easy day and anywhere I care to be in 2.  Like others I wish the population would go back to 1980s levels but none the less I likely won't be moving any time soon.

 

Oh, did I mention I used to be able to walk out my door and hunt grouse across the street...

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COPPERDOG

Northern Wisconsin for me. That way wouldn't be a bad drive to Minnesota or UP of Michigan.

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sharptail grouse

Hmmm.......reading much of this makes it seem like maybe too many humans........

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Millriver

I kinda like where I live here in western Massachusetts. There’s nothing like autumn in New England and I’ve got decent bird hunting and fishing close by. I can be in northern New Hampshire, Vermont, the Cape, and coastal Rhode Island or Maine in 3 hours or less. And 2 hours to Boston if I want a city fix. I’m not fond of the politics here, but I’m not generally fond of politics period.

 

 I wouldn’t mind spending summer in the northern Rockies for the fly fishing, you folks in Montana, Idaho, Wyoming and Colorado are lucky for that. I’d like maybe to be somewhere in the Caribbean to bonefish for a month or 2 in January and February. But have to be here in March to make syrup for the UJ auction!😊

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RayB

Colorado

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Rockdoc
12 hours ago, dgfavor said:

My wife and kids and I moved to the Seattle area in 1988. What a disaster! We’d gone there on vacation and loved the warm friendly people. It turned out that they weren’t warm and friendly, only polite, as in too polite to tell us to gotohell to our faces. After nine months of that BS my wife had enough and took the kids and bailed on me, moving back to her family home in Illinois. I followed them a month later.

There used to be cantankerous olde phart that wrote articles for the local Seattle newspaper. One time during heavy rains a residential area flooded because a new subdivision built nearby and up dip hadn’t allowed for proper rainwater run-off. Mr. Olde Phart blamed all the folks moving in from out of state and buying homes there. He didn’t say a word about the greedy local developers that originally screwed up the areas natural drainage.

Steve

PS after my above whining I just thought I'd mention the fact that I've lived in Wisconsin, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, California, Texas, Arizona, and Washington. Seattle Washington was the only place I've lived that I actually felt hostility for moving there.

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Rockdoc
1 hour ago, sharptail grouse said:

Hmmm.......reading much of this makes it seem like maybe too many humans........

According to demographers, the world's population didn't reach 1 billion until 1804, and it took 123 years to hit the 2 billion mark in 1927. Then the pace accelerated — 3 billion in 1959, 4 billion in 1974, 5 billion in 1987, 6 billion in 1998, 7 billion in 2011.

 Looking ahead, the U.N. projects that the world population will reach 8 billion by 2025, 10 billion by 2083.

Whatever happened to the zero population growth movement (ZPG) that was popular back in the 60's and 70's?

Steve

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jeff88
Just now, Rockdoc said:

According to demographers, the world's population didn't reach 1 billion until 1804, and it took 123 years to hit the 2 billion mark in 1927. Then the pace accelerated — 3 billion in 1959, 4 billion in 1974, 5 billion in 1987, 6 billion in 1998, 7 billion in 2011.

 Looking ahead, the U.N. projects that the world population will reach 8 billion by 2025, 10 billion by 2083.

Whatever happened to the zero population growth movement (ZPG) that was popular back in the 60's and 70's?

Steve

Isn't the US less than zero growth right now?  Can't recall where I read that there will be less workers year over year to support retirement and health care costs for the Boomers.  Other continents are definitely not practicing anything close to zero growth with the exception of Europe.  Asia, Africa and LATAm are rising.

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Big Al
1 hour ago, Rockdoc said:

According to demographers, the world's population didn't reach 1 billion until 1804, and it took 123 years to hit the 2 billion mark in 1927. Then the pace accelerated — 3 billion in 1959, 4 billion in 1974, 5 billion in 1987, 6 billion in 1998, 7 billion in 2011.

 Looking ahead, the U.N. projects that the world population will reach 8 billion by 2025, 10 billion by 2083.

Whatever happened to the zero population growth movement (ZPG) that was popular back in the 60's and 70's?

Steve

 

I watched the deer population explode in central Montana.  Then in 2011-2013 the population collapsed because of disease.  There is probably half the population now as there was before the collapse.  

Could this happen to humans also?  It has in the past.

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