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Tim Frazier

Who loves their job?

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Greg Hartman

I can say that I have always loved my "job" (more of a lifestyle than a job, actually, because I did and do still both work AND play all the time).  It's intellectually challenging and different every day.  Winning a hard fought battle or putting together a really great deal for a client is a rush.  The fact that I'm still working at nearly 74 years old says a lot.

 

That said, I could not work "for" anyone - that would not be good for my "boss" or for me.  My time in the Army taught me to loathe and bite back at anyone seeking to have authority over me and to simply not accept that situation.  But, I was always the "boss" for all the years I worked full-time, so a non-issue.  Now that I'm a lowly part-time employee of the firm I founded and my former protégé is my "boss", I still do, dress, come and go, etc., exactly as I please, when and how I please, so the "boss" thing doesn't bother me.  I figure that if they don't like what I am doing they can fire me.  Instead, they keep my name first on the wall and keep giving me perks to keep me from retiring, even though I show up in jeans and boots.

 

The only thing I didn't like about my career is that I was the only lawyer in the local area doing complex M&A and tax work (previously, people had to go to NYC or Phila to get that kind of counsel), so very quickly after I hung my shingle, I had far more work to do than I could do; and work in specialty areas that I didn't know.   So, I had to hire other lawyers (and, of course their support staff) to help me out.  They were good lawyers and before too long, they were swamped with work and needed help, too.  Pretty soon, I found myself the unintended "managing partner" of a fair sized (for this area) law firm, worrying about everything to making payroll for all the employees, to making sure we had enough paper clips, to hiring and firing, to resolving cat fights (managing good lawyers is truly like herding cats), etc.  One of the best things I ever did early on was hiring a Wharton MBA as a firm administrator, which took a lot of that off me, but too much still remained.  I was never trained in management, never liked it and wasn't especially good at it - just had no choice but to do it at the expense of time to actually practice law, something I thought I was fairly good at.  When my wife began to need full care back in 2008, I resigned as a partner and became a part-time employee.  I was VERY glad to be shed of the management and to be able to just practice law.

 

Nancy is retiring at the end of this month and she's much younger than me.  Lately, I have been giving serious thoughts to fully retiring as I am gradually enjoying my work less - just getting tired of it; and gradually getting more annoyed on the admittedly rare occasions when work gets in the way of things I want to do.  Maybe by this time next year, I'll actually retire and let my license go.  May drop my positions as president of some charities, too (except the gun club presidency) - after all the years of doing that stuff, I feel I've served my time for the community and being done would feel good.

 

 

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406dn
57 minutes ago, Don Steese said:

I never could understand how anyone could get up every morning ( in my case 4:00 AM) and go to a job they didn't like. I know money and benefits play a role but fear of the unknown also plays a big part of why people stay in jobs they hate. I looked forward to going to work every day.  If some fool with more money than brains hadn't come along I'd probably still be doing it!

 

While I didn't have to get up at 4am most mornings, I worked a job for 28 years that provided well for my family, funded a prosperous retirement etc. I would not say I hated the job,,,,but like it,,,, nope. There were great people there and a few a--holes, but the culture of the corporation was very cold. I was able to manage a path in the company and leave the stage under my own terms. That was good. 

 

As said earlier, retirement is the best job I've ever had.  

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Speaks

There are things that I love about my job, other things not so much. In my case the toughest part is never really being able to get away from it, cant recall the last vacation day that I didnt have to take a few urgent calls, same with a significant chunk of evenings and weekends. That said it also comes with reasonable flexibility on a day to day basis and great financial rewards for the effort. 

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MNice

I'll invoke the 5th.

 

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SelbyLowndes

My retirement from law practice was kind of like Greg's, I thought I would die at my desk.  But I had extensive heart surgery (seven by-pass) and decided while in the hospital I had too many grandchildren to hug and too much fishing and hunting left to do to devote the rest of my life with fixing other people's problems.

 

I quit at 68 after 45 years and have been happy ever since.  I'll let you know if I still like it when the money runs out...SelbyLowndes

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River19

Interesting question......

 

I think no matter how passionate you are about a particular role, industry, mission etc. there will always be some aspect of it that becomes tiring when you are forced to do it and have your time allocation somewhat dictated by someone else.

 

Do I love my job?  As far as "jobs" go it is acceptable and keeps me engaged and challenged enough.  That being said, there certainly are times where I deplore it on some level.  Would I rather work in a bike shop all day?  Sure.  But no one will pay me what I make now to do something I find enjoyable.

 

Also, for people that have turned a hobby into a business and job, many of them regret the decision.  I talked to someone who ties flies for a business, it was a hobby, they retired early, they liked tying flies and were good at it, began tying for a large company and now never fishes anymore and has deadlines and quotas and pressure and he hates that his escape is now something he deplores.

 

Balance.  As long as my job allows enough balance for me I am good.......

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Remo

Retired. Love it.

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MUSTANGER7

Since all you guys have been paying my salary my entire life, I do love that. Seriously I would say that 75% of the time I loved my time in the Corps which has its own culture, I've heard it said that the Army, Navy and Air Force are like business's while the Marine Corps is more like a religion. Being a "Mustanger" I definitely saw things from a much different perspective than my peers, with them being a mustanger caused some resentment issues but with the troops it was a definite plus. The 25% times where mostly the frequent deployments, they were hard on a family life. Exciting times were a definite plus, all in all I'm lucky and fortunate that for me I made the military a career!! Semper Fi

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MAArcher

I don't love my job.  If there was anyway I could make the same amount of money doing just about anything else, I'd be all over it.  

 

 

 

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Mike da Carpenter

Flat out enjoy what I get to do everyday.  Some days more than others, but for the most part I have no issues getting up and going to work.  
 

On the other hand, I work with quite a few guys who constantly complain (think Ron Swanson from Parks & Rec TV show).  I hold no punches back when telling them not to infect myself, or other good employees, with their cancerous attitudes.

 

Actually just started a pre-retirement gig last week (working weekends and when the business is swamped during the week) where I’m able to learn the finer points of bird dog training then start training for them and I’m able to run my dog OFTEN.  It’s a 12-15 year plan, but I don’t want to rush into anything.  Not to mention, I need to ease my wife into letting our GSP produce his own stock.  Right now, she is having no part of it.

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JonR

Retired.

Love what I do.

Love what I don't have to do even more.

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kgb

I retired from the Air Force, took a couple part time jobs to keep busy for a while and will be taking another soon, really enjoyed the career(s) especially as being part of what I considered a greater good.  As for making your hobby your career, that was sold to the students in part at the PA gunsmithing school.  I do not buy into that, not that there's anything wrong with loving what you do but for me they thrive better individually rather than combined.  Wrenching on my hobby car is a joy, all of the aggravation and blue language included, but it was my labor of love, not something to earn a living.  Same with guns, although aggravation has never approached what I've experienced with autos.  We had a student who came from a machinist background, I think sliding over to firearms was an easy step for him to increase his interest in what he was doing by branching out from what sounded like maybe too much of assembly-line work.  

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WI Outdoor Nut

Tough to believe, but have been at the "grind" out of college for 22 years.  If my advisor would have said the job I ended up with, for the pay, and flexibility, I would have said sign me up.  I love what I do, and often can't wait to get to the office.  This past morning was here by 6 am, even though my first meeting was at 8.  The work is challenging, stimulating, and I have an opportunity to work on cutting edge technology.  The company I work for has recognized what I am bringing to the table and I hire out the administrative parts of my job, or projects that can simply be executed.  I have full support of my current manager and he essentially lets me pick what I work on.  I get 6 weeks vacation, 10 paid holidays and 2 floating days, not that I get a chance to use them all, but I am not complaining.  Have a matching 401K, pension, and good insurance.  Going back about 15 years ago, a mentor of mine said put an add in the paper (would be facebook now), on what you do, your pay, bennies, etc, and 97 out of 100 people would trade with you.  Now mind you, this didn't just happen.  Hard work, early sacrifices, and making the moves necessary and the RIGHT times.     

 

Now don't get me wrong, there are still some BS parts of work.  And I have had a bad boss or two, but overall love my work.  From a financial standpoint, should be able to retire at 55 if I choose to, but either won't or I will consult on the side for a stupid bill rate (do a little moon lighting now, and can't believe the pay and already turning down jobs). 

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WI Outdoor Nut
7 minutes ago, kgb said:

I retired from the Air Force, took a couple part time jobs to keep busy for a while and will be taking another soon, really enjoyed the career(s) especially as being part of what I considered a greater good.  As for making your hobby your career, that was sold to the students in part at the PA gunsmithing school.  I do not buy into that, not that there's anything wrong with loving what you do but for me they thrive better individually rather than combined.  Wrenching on my hobby car is a joy, all of the aggravation and blue language included, but it was my labor of love, not something to earn a living.  Same with guns, although aggravation has never approached what I've experienced with autos.  We had a student who came from a machinist background, I think sliding over to firearms was an easy step for him to increase his interest in what he was doing by branching out from what sounded like maybe too much of assembly-line work.  

My uncle owns a gun shop and my cousin is now the gun smith.  It is amazing on how many people are very stupid with what they do to guns, and he needs to fix them.  He has had rounds explode while working on them, expect guns to work when completely neglected, and everyone wants their guns fixed for free because they purchased them there.  I don't envy him FWIW. 

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Randy S

On paper, my job looks pretty good to an outdoorsman. I work 19 hrs. every Sat. & Sun and am paid for 40. I also work the same hrs on 10 holidays. The problem is there's always required overtime and training that interferes with my weekdays off. I just took Christmas and the day after as my first holidays off in 14 years. I'm an air rescue firefighter who operates heavy equipment inbetween flights. Most guys would love the gig, but it's a municipal job and they don't pay much but have good benies. I have no supervision at work. None. No one knows if I show up or even die at work. I plan to work two more years to get full retirement and then I'll probably stick around for awhile just to return the aggravation they've caused me. That aggravation hasn't been insignificant. 

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