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Tim Frazier

Who loves their job?

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pa'tridge hunters

I think the trick to contentment is not to be defined by what you do for a living. If what you do is who you are, your not going to be very happy when you retire.  Do your job, take the money, go home, and be happy there.

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kgb
15 minutes ago, WI Outdoor Nut said:

My uncle owns a gun shop and my cousin is now the gun smith.  It is amazing on how many people are very stupid with what they do to guns, and he needs to fix them.  He has had rounds explode while working on them, expect guns to work when completely neglected, and everyone wants their guns fixed for free because they purchased them there.  I don't envy him FWIW. 

 

We may revere our firearms as "enthusiasts", but to many people they're just tools and I fully get that notion.  Small engine repair folks probably get to see similar treatment of their work.  Gun companies seem lately in competition to produce very affordable guns, the point of "cheaper to buy new than repair" has already passed in several categories of firearm.  Does your uncle's shop specialize or do they provide general services?  

 

You've expressed surprise at the hand-over-fist earnings you're now experiencing, I'd say few gunsmiths ever reach that point and the rewards come from the work itself.

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mccuha

I've never had a job per say that I looked forward getting up and going to do.  I do believe I have a job that I do on the side that I do enjoy doing but at times it gets in the way of my desire to hunt.  In say about 6 yrs from now when I can leave the job I'm in with full benefits and make my side job as permanent as I'd like. The other thing about my side gig is I make a whole lot more money, more than I make on my full time job.

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walt lister

Spent 48years as a Toolmaker/Jig & Fixture builder. Two great jobs, first, 14 years at North American Rockwell working on various airplane, Apollo capsule and Saturn rocket tooling. Very interesting, worked up to a leadman position at Seal Beach CA  overseeing a group of 10/12 toolmakers. Was laid off and luckily spent the next 34 years working at a small family owned Machine shop that specialized in difficult to make computer parts.  Much of the tooling we made was to very close dimensions. Routinely had to work to +-.0002 or even less tolerance on inspection fixtures/gauges etc.  Very satisfying work having to push myself to face new challenges often.

Excellent front office engineering and management and sharp though demanding floor supervision. It is wonderful to work in a situation where after you have been accepted into the "family" you can take any concerns right up to an owner and get a thoughtful response.  

Retired now but really liked my jobs.        

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Kre

I love my job...IT/Process Control.

 

7+ weeks of vacation, great benefits and decent pay.  The people I work with are awesome...union and management!

 

I hope this is the last job I have!

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Samuel Hoggson

Love my job.  Dairy farm pigeon and rat exterminator.  Love it so much I do it for free.  Farmers are happy to see us, tell us where the hot spots are.  Sometimes get asked if we want to be paid in some way.  That's pretty funny.  Cuz we'd pay to do it. 

 

The house-husband part is OK, too.  Less fun than killing stuff, but not bad. 

 

Sure beats doing anesthesia.  They had to pay me to make me do that stuff.  Cuz otherwise......

 

 

 

 

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martyg
3 hours ago, Tim Frazier said:

I have long believed that any job becomes a job no matter how great it starts out.  

 

So spot on.

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WI Outdoor Nut
29 minutes ago, kgb said:

 

We may revere our firearms as "enthusiasts", but to many people they're just tools and I fully get that notion.  Small engine repair folks probably get to see similar treatment of their work.  Gun companies seem lately in competition to produce very affordable guns, the point of "cheaper to buy new than repair" has already passed in several categories of firearm.  Does your uncle's shop specialize or do they provide general services?  

Their bread and butter is low cost, high volume and main stream guns.  Be it rifles, shotguns, pistols and scopes.  They also sell quite a few a few shells/rounds that the big box folks can't touch.  Have a large assortment of used stuff that either comes in on trade, or estate sales.  They are not rich by any means, but have done well.  I started to work for him when he just started out.  I was 14-16 at the time.  Was a good little gig for him and me, and for him, turned full time job.  The AFT is a pain to deal with and that is almost my aunt's full time job.  I know when I talk with my uncle, aunt or two cousins that will be taking over the biz, they like dealing with gun, just not the idiots who purchase and abuse them. 

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Flairball

I love what I do, but in the last few years, the last year specifically, there have been some changes which I am still adjusting to. Some of these changes are of my own doing. After years of riding busy engine companies, and a busy rescue company in some of the city’s worst neighborhoods, I decided to slow down. Getting promoted put me at the bottom of the seniority list, so I was bound to land at a slower house, but I bid on, and won the bid for an extremely slow (though you wouldn’t know it last night; 4 runs after midnight) engine company in a nice residential area. Even with less than a year in grade I’ve had opportunities to go to busier fire companies, but I’m ready to let some dust settle on me when I’m at work. It is a little difficult adjusting to the boredom, but there are many positives, too.

 

Currently I am getting my crew accustomed to enjoying a little freedom from the firehouse while working. Our district has a lot of ammenties, and they are starting to understand that when I ask if anyone has anything to do each morning I mean it. Slowly we are spending a bit more time driving around our sub-district doing things, even if it’s just going out for a coffee.  Yesterday we picked up dry cleaning, and shopped for new sneakers. When the weather gets warm again we’ll be eating lunch at one of our local parks or greenways. We’re always in service and on the air, and we need to get the flat spots out of the tires somehow. Anyway,  sing on the road is how you learn your district inside and out. That never hurts. 

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Pub Scout

The word is Job because Fun was already taken.

 

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406dn
37 minutes ago, pa'tridge hunters said:

I think the trick to contentment is not to be defined by what you do for a living. If what you do is who you are, your not going to be very happy when you retire.  Do your job, take the money, go home, and be happy there.

 

I completely agree with that. Two of my siblings had long high pressure top level management jobs in corporate America. Each of them made quite a bit more than I did. But they had to sell their souls to do it. They did not own a minute of their time. Even when our father was hospitalized clinging to life, they had to duck in and out to take care of things. 

 

While my sister took to retirement really well, my brother had quite a bit of difficulty with it. Largely, I think, because his career consumed him.

 

I remember my last day of work as an indescribable state of joy.  

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ElGordo

As long as you have to get up and go to work everyday my jobs not bad.

I'll never be rich but I consider myself comfortable. I get 22 vacation days, 12 sick days and 12 holidays. I live in an area with good bird hunting and good to excellent fly fishing. I sometimes feel like rainbows and sunshine come out of my butt. I feel lucky. 

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CptSydor

I currently have two jobs I guess:

 

1) Paid on-call firefighter. Love it, however I really only average 7-10 hours a week, which keeps it fresh. I'd do it full-time, but that's not in the cards. Certainly elements would get old if I was doing it full-time.

 

2) I also coordinate/administer a satellite educational program for a major university. Its 3 days a week, pension, benefits. Pretty solid job, especially for where I live and my lifestyle. I rarely interact personally with anyone in my job. Our central office is 700km away and all the local instructors/learners are spread throughout the region. I sit alone in my office most of the time, which is the worst part. Lots of potential for the job to be flexible and work from home, hopefully that will come in the future.

 

I worked managing/coordinating a large program in a university prior to this. Really enjoyed it, had its rough times, but the new influx of students yearly kept it fresh and upbeat. Have had a couple jobs in the past I hated. Woke up dreading going in. Quickly learned that if I woke up and didn't mind going to work, that was pretty good.

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Dick Sellers

My career as a wildlife biologist had some rough going early on, but my final 25 years with the Alaska Dept. of Fish and Game were the stuff dreams are made of.

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snapt

I dig my Fire/Medic Job, 48 on with my second family, 4 days off to hunt, ski, fish etc. It has its negatives but at this point in my career the positives far outweigh them. Also, I'd like to be on Flairball's engine, sounds like my kind of Co.

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