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Tim Frazier

Who loves their job?

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Mike da Carpenter
On 1/9/2020 at 10:31 PM, FlyChamps said:

After 44 years in the CPA business, the last 34 self-employed, I must say I enjoy my "job" (it's really much more than a job) but the end is coming.  At 71 I've decided that the time for me to retire has arrived and will be doing so at the end of this year.  

 

I'm quite sure that I'll be able to keep myself busy fly-fishing, shooting, hunting, traveling, etc. for the rest of my life but I will miss assisting my clients in the future - I have several grandparent, parent, grandchildren client groups I work for and other clients who are almost family.  We'll stay in touch but it won't be the same relationship as being their CPA.

 

Now it's off to a 3 day weekend with our Vintager group at Back Woods Quail Club in Georgetown, SC - tax work postponed until Monday.

 

 


Out youngest is wanting to be a CPA.  At 14, he says the best way to make money is to figure out how to make even more money for people who have more than you.  Pretty simple business plan.

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martyg
14 minutes ago, Mike da Carpenter said:


Out youngest is wanting to be a CPA.  At 14, he says the best way to make money is to figure out how to make even more money for people who have more than you.  Pretty simple business plan.

 

Spot on.  My end-game was not to build infrastructure and brand equity, but to build as much wealth as possible, like six-figures per month, and not six-figures per year, and get the fuk out. As one person said early on in this thread, anything becomes a job. In teaching skiing in some of the most stupendous places in the US, by February I am just done skiing.

 

While I dealt with tangible goods, my overall model was to work with data analytics to make others hundreds of millions. That made my time and attention valuable to them.

 

I retired at 52, fully self funded. My job now is to race bikes, ski, kayak, fly fish, be a loving husband, and to be a service animal to my canine.

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NJ_Springer

I love my job but hate where I work. Hoping to change that soon.

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bigjohnsd

I loved the Navy for twenty years, a new job every 2-3 years, but was glad to go after 20 years.

I had several jobs post Navy each for a few years and I looked forward to the individual challenges they provided.

When I bought my Powersports  Dealership I looked forward to going to work every day for the first five years, once I decided I was tired of working it became a drag.

When my partner bought my share I was really glad and at 53 was able to do what I wanted when I wanted, hunted a lot, traveled a lot.

As the years have gone by interests have changed, compulsions have arisen, motorcycles have replaced some of the hunting days.

Grandkids have come into the picture.

Retirement is great - as long as you can afford it!

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DoubleAuto

Worked 26+ years in fisheries work and doing water quality work for a federal agency.  Got to do a lot of great and varied things.  Spent a lot of times out on the rivers and lakes in boats of various sizes.  Spent the last 6+ years working in a Coal Quality Lab.  Not as much fun but worked with some nice people.  Got to retire at 58 years old.

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Brad Eden

I started out my working life with a great deal of satisfaction in the commercial art field in the Boston area. This was way back in the early 80's before the digital revolution. Graphic design was more of a trade back then. Everything was hands on, in the sense that you built printed design work (mechanicals) on a drafting table. There was a skill involved above and behind "artistic talent". Creating a mechanical with layers of acetate and waxed typography, covered with tracing paper marked up with color codes and photo and printing specs and instructions demanded a level of expertise not found today. And there was a great deal of pride when you delivered it to an offset printing production departments to have it shot with stat cameras and plates burned. And then watching the printed piece be it a brochure, a catalog, or an annual report roll off the printing press, and then holding something in your hand that you made and created was gratifying. Eventually "Desktop Publishing" was born and everybody with a Mac became a designer. The entire industry quickly turned totally digital, arguably more so than any other industry, and grasping software was more important than artistic talent and mechanical skills. I never became completely comfortable with the digital side of graphic design. Although the occasional illustration assignments were still enriching. I stuck with it, working at Ad agencies for short stints but mostly worked solo freelance out of spare bedroom offices. That lifestyle allowed me maybe too much freedom and I hunted my ass off for birds every fall. The Ad/marketing agency world is one big fat deadline and having to deal with clients in general, as anyone knows can be a real PIA. It ended up a constant battle to upgrade and relearn design software and attempts to keep up with constant digital changes was exhausting. I ended that career consulting as an art director on a project to project basis (I did work with my oldest daughter who is also a graphic designer, on projects towards the end which was cool). After doing it for over 35 years I basically weaned myself off the commercial art wheel, and am retired from that. So to answer the question. Yes and no. I loved my career and work choices because of the freedom and independence it provided. But it wasn't particularly lucrative so "full retirement" isn't part of my vocabulary. I have a few irons in the fire now to keep the wolves at bay.

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airmedic1

When I went to paramedic school we had two instructors that had been flight nurses.  I asked the one why she would ever quit that great job?  She told me that when you get to the point where you don’t like flying with the people you fly with its time to quit.  I thought she was crazy.  44 of us started medic school, 14 finished and the other 13 all wanted to be flight medics.  I never had the desire to be a flight medic but one day a job posted and I applied and was hired.  I loved flying even though I was deathly air sick for the first nine months.  I stayed with it for five years and then things changed.  When I first started, all of the pilots were Vietnam era vets with thousands of hours of PIC.  They had all been shot down at least once and survived.  They were fantastic.  Towards the end of my career as a flight medic some of those guys retired and others medically retired.  The replacements didn’t have the experience those guys did and didn’t have the hours of PIC either.  They weren’t safe.  One of those new pilots flew us in to a level 5 thunderstorm and had to beat a hasty retreat to get us out of danger.  He then flew us a circuitous route back to base and we landed on fumes.  We fueled at the airport BoO and based at the hospital.  I refused to ride with him back to hospital and quit shortly thereafter.  There was also a corporate element as well, we used to fly BK-117’s and then transitioned to A-Stars.  Those old Vietnam guys told me never trust a helicopter whose rotor wings turn the wrong way and I believed them.  We went from two engines to one and no ability to treat the patient.  Eight months after I quit, that pilot landed and then took off again to troubleshoot a problem.  He piled that A-Star up and killed himself, the nurse and the medic.  I had over 100 hours in that ship, glad I quit when I did.

When I promoted to chief at the fire department, I went to the training division.  Four weeks after I promoted, the chief that promoted me quit.  The assistant chief became the interim and then got the full time position.  I really like the guy but right after he was announced the full time chief he called me to his office and said he was changing things.  He changed the makeup of the command staff and gave me EMS as well as Training and I had to be a suppression chief every eight days.  It wasn’t what I signed up for but what do you do.  I worked 70-80 hours a week for several years and now I am only the EMS chief but I still put in 50+ hours a week.  The politics are worse now than ever and I can’t wait to retire.  My wife is younger than I am and just went back to nurse practitioner school so I said I would stay for another two years until she finishes if I can.  I can honestly say I don’t like my job much anymore.

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Tilkut

Been with current employer about 15 years. We are continually changing compensation package, sales practices, goals, etc... and none of it helps me be more successful. I have done well in my career, but I am way tired of the next great thing. Losing the patience and will to keep battling the negatives. So no, can’t say I love my job. Hope to tolerate it another couple years. I envy those that do. 

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GB Jack
28 minutes ago, Tilkut said:

Been with current employer about 15 years. We are continually changing compensation package, sales practices, goals, etc... and none of it helps me be more successful. I have done well in my career, but I am way tired of the next great thing. Losing the patience and will to keep battling the negatives. So no, can’t say I love my job. Hope to tolerate it another couple years. I envy those that do. 

Yup 

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Zoli 16ga.

Retired...so I love my job...and I love my boss even more...😉

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Don Steese

I'm really surprised at the number of people who are working in jobs they don't like. I guess the fact that I worked for myself for many years has something to do with that? 

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airmedic1

I have what is called a “golden noose” around my neck, can’t do anything else to make this much money!  Since I’m a shitty golfer, I can’t turn pro, there’s not a lot of demand for a mediocre pheasant hunter and my wife would frown on me being a male hooker ( not that there would be any demand) I don’t know what else to do.  

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tclprin
18 hours ago, ccavacini said:

Taught high school English for forty years, coached football for 28.  Loved it.  Never had two bad days in a row.  No two days were alike.

 

I went from teaching senior comp to teaching freshmen at our Freshman Academy my last ten years.  Frosh are goofier than hell, but I had a blast.  

 

Still in contact (on Facebook) with many former students and players.

 

Retired in 2011.  I know this. I'll never wake up one day, look in the mirror, and ask what I've done with my life.

 

So similar to my public school experience. 16 years as a teacher, then 24 years administration (the prin in my user name). I too have FB "friends" who are former students. I actually worked 2 years beyond my maximum pension benefits because I loved it. Deciding to retire was difficult, but fishing/hunting was a motivator! I have landed in a perfect spot 7 years later. I currently am a coordinator of a graduate program for teachers aspiring to become principals, supervise student teachers at a local university, and work for Pearson training scorers and scoring the state assessments for those who are seeking the principalship. All of these are part time,  and for the most part, have total control of my time. And I love going to work because now it is a break from fishing/hunting/ running the setter! Feel most fortunate in my choice of careers.

Edited by tclprin
Added dialogue

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doodlecrazy

Sitting at work right now at 4:50 A.M after another 13 hour night shift. If you love shift work, missing out on birthdays, anniversaries, and holidays with family then sure, I love my job, but those things are important to me. I do respect my job and am blessed to have it because it allows me to provide for my family and I honestly love driving 830,000 pound trucks for a living but shift work still sucks.

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birdhuntervet

I’m a veterinarian that limits practice pretty much to cattle. I really do like what I do. Been at it since 1988.

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