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Tim Frazier

Who loves their job?

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Zoli 16ga.

37 years in the construction industry as an Ironworker.

10 years of hard labour as a rodman. Hated the job, but great money.

17 years welding ornamental iron and car plant referbs. Great job, great money.

10 years as a construction safety officer. A ton of stress, loved/hated it, but great money.

One way to look at it is that the job allows you to do/afford (retired, debt free) things that you love to do when not at work. Very few have both, but good on them if they do.

 

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Ben Hong
On 1/9/2020 at 11:17 AM, Canuck said:

I loved my work as a self-employed fisheries biologist even though my boss was a jerk.

I retired for medical reasons. I really love being retired. It is the best job ever.

You did right. If you were self employed and the boss is a real jerk, get rid of the barstage by retiring9_9.

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Ben Hong
21 minutes ago, Zoli 16ga. said:

37 years in the construction industry as an Ironworker.

10 years of hard labour as a rodman. Hated the job, but great money.

17 years welding ornamental iron and car plant referbs. Great job, great money.

10 years as a construction safety officer. A ton of stress, loved/hated it, but great money.

One way to look at it is that the job allows you to do/afford (retired, debt free) things that you love to do when not at work. Very few have both, but good on them if they do.

 

How old are you? I added 74 years of work in your career.

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Ben Hong

Most of my formal working life has been in the international trade field, on both levels of government. I was a Foreign Service guy without ever having been posted overseas (by choice), although I did some temporary relief postings. I was well paid , worked for and with some great people, did some interesting work, rubbed elbows with the high and  not so mighty, experienced some fabulous places, ate some strange and tasty food, enjoyed some great cultures, and most importantly introduced our Canadian companies to the wonderful, and profitable,  world of exporting. It was rewarding and enjoyable.

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Fishnfowler

I'm working small town Family Practice Medicine.  One of my mentors used to say, "10% of the people give you 90% of the satisfaction."  That has always been true for me, but after 18 years in the same place, I think I'm up to 20% on the satisfaction scale.  That said, the corporate side of the medical world has eroded any joy I previously found in my work, (sorry to any of you who are my patients).  I've got less than 10 years to retirement and can see the light at the end of the tunnel. I'm going to finish my career with dignity, but can't say I enjoy it much anymore.

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Coalman
On 1/9/2020 at 10:17 AM, Canuck said:

I really love being retired. It is the best job ever.

 

Ditto

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Zoli 16ga.
7 hours ago, Ben Hong said:

How old are you? I added 74 years of work in your career.

10+17+10=37 

Started at 16, retired at 53, now I'm 58

 

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Tim Frazier
On 1/11/2020 at 5:10 PM, airmedic1 said:

When I went to paramedic school we had two instructors that had been flight nurses.  I asked the one why she would ever quit that great job?  She told me that when you get to the point where you don’t like flying with the people you fly with its time to quit.  I thought she was crazy.  44 of us started medic school, 14 finished and the other 13 all wanted to be flight medics.  I never had the desire to be a flight medic but one day a job posted and I applied and was hired.  I loved flying even though I was deathly air sick for the first nine months.  I stayed with it for five years and then things changed.  When I first started, all of the pilots were Vietnam era vets with thousands of hours of PIC.  They had all been shot down at least once and survived.  They were fantastic.  Towards the end of my career as a flight medic some of those guys retired and others medically retired.  The replacements didn’t have the experience those guys did and didn’t have the hours of PIC either.  They weren’t safe.  One of those new pilots flew us in to a level 5 thunderstorm and had to beat a hasty retreat to get us out of danger.  He then flew us a circuitous route back to base and we landed on fumes.  We fueled at the airport BoO and based at the hospital.  I refused to ride with him back to hospital and quit shortly thereafter.  There was also a corporate element as well, we used to fly BK-117’s and then transitioned to A-Stars.  Those old Vietnam guys told me never trust a helicopter whose rotor wings turn the wrong way and I believed them.  We went from two engines to one and no ability to treat the patient.  Eight months after I quit, that pilot landed and then took off again to troubleshoot a problem.  He piled that A-Star up and killed himself, the nurse and the medic.  I had over 100 hours in that ship, glad I quit when I did.

When I promoted to chief at the fire department, I went to the training division.  Four weeks after I promoted, the chief that promoted me quit.  The assistant chief became the interim and then got the full time position.  I really like the guy but right after he was announced the full time chief he called me to his office and said he was changing things.  He changed the makeup of the command staff and gave me EMS as well as Training and I had to be a suppression chief every eight days.  It wasn’t what I signed up for but what do you do.  I worked 70-80 hours a week for several years and now I am only the EMS chief but I still put in 50+ hours a week.  The politics are worse now than ever and I can’t wait to retire.  My wife is younger than I am and just went back to nurse practitioner school so I said I would stay for another two years until she finishes if I can.  I can honestly say I don’t like my job much anymore.

Wow, you gave me goose bumps this morning!  I experienced many of those same circumstances and for the most part I couldn't get myself to trust a pilot who hadn't flown in the military in some sort of combat/expedition role.  We had some of the finest pilots and the Sikorsky's were phenomenal birds.  Of course it's never as simple as just one factor but after 3 hard landings and a run of really gruesome flights involving kids, I just thought it better for my own mental health to see what my other options might be.  I still miss it some days (not so much the nights when it wakes me up) but I didn't look back and have no regrets from moving on.

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Dick Sellers

All this talk of flying prompted this post.  The last 22 years of my wildlife management career was out on the Alaska Peninsula (the one that goes out to the Aleutian Islands (not the better known Kenai Peninsula).  Where I lived the entire maintained road system  (not counting 4-wheeler trials) was about 30 miles, and "my area" stretched from Lake Clark to the Aleutian Islands (roughly 1,000 miles).  My area also included the Aleutian Islands, but fortunately the US Fish and Wildlife Service covered the islands beyond the first one (Unimak) which had caribou and brown bears that I was responsible for managing.  Obviously most of my "field work" involved flying, amounting to several hundred hours a year in either a Super Cub, Cesna 185 or small helicopter.  Our sanctioned policy was that we got to chose who we wanted to fly with, rather than going with a low bidder.  Nevertheless, "sheet'" happens.  While I was out there, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service lost a plane, killing the pilot and severely injuring a graduate student that was doing a moose study.  It took 2 days to find that wreck, despite 5 planes looking.

I was in 2 "unscheduled landings", both involving gas problems.   Fortunately in both cases the combination of pilot skill and a the proximity of a relative nice landing spot (a frozen lake in one and marsh in the other) resulted in minimal damage to the helicopter in one case or Cesna 185 in the other, and no injuries to me or the pilots.  My assistant was also in 2 crashes (one rather mild and the other totaling a Super Cub) and was banged up some in the later. 

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Canuck

Two helicopter auto-rotation landings (one no real damage, second one collapsed the skids and rotor cut off the tail boom) and one hard landing and one blind, landing in a blizzard on a lake with no fuel left in Twin Otters.

 

Scary but looking back I wouldn't have changed a thing except the landing in a blizzard. That was pilot error and a passenger (me) who went along to get along even though I knew we were in for a weather change.

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Tim Frazier
15 minutes ago, Canuck said:

Two helicopter auto-rotation landings (one no real damage, second one collapsed the skids and rotor cut off the tail boom) and one hard landing and one blind, landing in a blizzard on a lake with no fuel left in Twin Otters.

 

Scary but looking back I wouldn't have changed a thing except the landing in a blizzard. That was pilot error and a passenger (me) who went along to get along even though I knew we were in for a weather change.

So we are landing at a hospital in the Lake Erie snow belt and just as we are maybe a mile out we hit this complete white out.  Two of the finest pilots I flew with got us down.  Afterwards I asked JJ, "what was the clicking I could hear in my headset?"  JJ informed me it was the "re-ignitors" to keep the engines from flaming out as the snow filled the intakes (something to that effect)  Flying is often a risky proposition and I keep all who do it for a living in my prayers!

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mccuha

just realized. Starting Friday and for the next two weeks I'll like my job. Paid to quail hunt.  I don't want to grow old but I'm looking forward to retiring and being able to make my schedule and work or be off whenever I want.

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bennelli-banger
On January 13, 2020 at 10:00 AM, Dick Sellers said:

All this talk of flying prompted this post.  The last 22 years of my wildlife management career was out on the Alaska Peninsula (the one that goes out to the Aleutian Islands (not the better known Kenai Peninsula).  Where I lived the entire maintained road system  (not counting 4-wheeler trials) was about 30 miles, and "my area" stretched from Lake Clark to the Aleutian Islands (roughly 1,000 miles).  My area also included the Aleutian Islands, but fortunately the US Fish and Wildlife Service covered the islands beyond the first one (Unimak) which had caribou and brown bears that I was responsible for managing.  Obviously most of my "field work" involved flying, amounting to several hundred hours a year in either a Super Cub, Cesna 185 or small helicopter.  Our sanctioned policy was that we got to chose who we wanted to fly with, rather than going with a low bidder.  Nevertheless, "sheet'" happens.  While I was out there, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service lost a plane, killing the pilot and severely injuring a graduate student that was doing a moose study.  It took 2 days to find that wreck, despite 5 planes looking.

I was in 2 "unscheduled landings", both involving gas problems.   Fortunately in both cases the combination of pilot skill and a the proximity of a relative nice landing spot (a frozen lake in one and marsh in the other) resulted in minimal damage to the helicopter in one case or Cesna 185 in the other, and no injuries to me or the pilots.  My assistant was also in 2 crashes (one rather mild and the other totaling a Super Cub) and was banged up some in the later. 

 

        ever hear of Pat Mcgee?  bush pilot?

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nutmeg grouser

Been blessed for the passed 30 years. Was a hack framer for my younger years. Worked hard and long hours and loved it. One day in a February with a Nor- Eastern bearing down on us a builder asked us to get a roof sheathed before the snow hit. He had been good to us,me and my bro, so we hammered it out with sleet , ice and snow flying while we were running around on the roof of a walk out basement home.Got it done by noon and he paid us for the whole day with a little bonus that was appreciated. We went to our nearest watering hole. At the time my wife was 6 months pregnant with our first child. I was 29 and I never thought about this in the past but all i thought about on that roof was becoming a statistic.

Behind the bar we went to was a friend who was there on a part time basis. Out of casual conversation he happened to ask me if I would be interested in a sales job as his other job was working at a masonry supply yard and they were looking for another sales guy.  I said yes and he arranged the interview. I immediately got the job. It started as a small salary to get me going and then turn into 100% commission. Daunting to say the least but I put my nose to the grind stone and all worked out. I got off of the small salary within 6 months and the 100% commission kicked in and I loved the job beyond belief. I did well and eventually my buddy and I sold out he companies manufacturing capabilities. I found myself doing well and some time on my hands. The housing market was good back then so we , we being my wife and i, decided to build some houses. She had a full time job so I would look for land and get them built as a GC and do my sales job as well. I loved it. Kids, now 2 of them, were young. I worked  mornings,day and evening selling and building. Absolutely loved it. 12-14 hour days - fantaaaastic! Fun stuff. This thread brought back this memories. I remember my wife at dinner one night saying to me, " most people hate their job. You have 2 that you love. That's not fair! I All I remember is saying yes i do.

She was right. I remember letting it soak in. I couldn't understand not loving my job(s). I was /am lucky to have had those years in my life.

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spring

For many people their faith, family, and their health are the most important things in their lives. Every day, the work I do influences these things; for my clients, who are also my friends.  Helping kids go to college, retire gracefully, and often, young families move into their first home. Helping businesses get started, sold, or transitioned to the next generation is special, while helping charities accomplish their goals of helping neighbors and communities, in part, because of the work that I do. I get invited to weddings, graduations, and also funerals. Holding a client's hand as they consider their next chapter can be tough, but it's part of being a friend. I've helped people shoulder the burden, and the joy, of dealing with an older mom and dad.  I try to make complicated things clear so people can understand them, and I do a lot of listening. Hearing of problems and finding solutions is what I get to do every day.  People need someone to put their interests first, and for many people, that someone is me. Helping people live the life they want, and in some cases, one that was only a dream, is rewarding. 

That's why I love my job....  🙂

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