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Treerooster

Need A New Truck UPDATED...got one

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Brad Eden
1 hour ago, salmontogue said:

Mine have been mostly leather with a few in nifty fabric.  Perhaps I should have taken a selfie to see if I resemble a wart.

 

Perk

Yes please do. I’ve always wondered what a wart in a sea of leather looks like. 

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Treerooster

Appreciate all the replies.

 

I actually looked at a Ranger today. Sat in it and checked it out. Smaller than I thought. Not sure I can go that small. I travel for all my hunting and need too much crap...plus the dogs. I drive mostly highway really, I do the 16 hour ride to Wis and back 4 times a year. Then turkey hunt several states and other upland hunting here & there puts a bunch of hours/miles on/in it. So long haul comfort is an issue with me.  Need the 4WD so I can really stuck when I get to the back roads. I have slept in the back of my truck quite a bit over the years but now that I am 63 those camps may be over. I do tow a pop-up camper now & then, but the camper is fairly light.

 

So I am probably back to a 1/2 ton sized vehicle. Looked at the Ford 150 while I was there and it seemed adequate for my needs. Still want to look at the Tundra and maybe Ram & Chevy. Still haven't decided between a 4 door with 5' bed or Super Cab with 6 1/2' bed. 

 

Interesting thoughts on the Ford engine between the 3.7 turbo and the 5.0 8 cyl. 

 

 

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bmeador

I bought a 2008 Tundra, second owner, 56000 miles.  Double cab, 5.7L engine, 8 foot bed, shell over bed.  Immaculate shape.  Gas mileage 16 MPG 35 - 90 MPH (don't ask).  Towing my camper - 11 MPG.  Wife and I ABSOLUTELY LOVE IT!!!!!  It is our hunting trip and camping vehicle without question!  We have a Toyota Prius that has batteries and a motor that gets 49.9 MPG on 5K mile round trips - but the Tundra gets the majority of the long haul miles.  It is bigger and safer than most other vehicles (other that tractor trailers) on all the major interstates - you are taller and this really helps with forward vision.  Better reaction time.  Bigger motor = quicker acceleration to avoid impacts.  8 foot bed and double cab = more space to carry more gear and more dogs!!!

 

It IS a huge vehicle!  With a winch on front we take 2 spots in any parking lot.  But it fits our needs and the only 2 things it lacks is more charging ports and a dual gas tank set up!

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C.J.L.
7 hours ago, dogrunner said:

I wouldn't call those guys Pros most of them acted like they never drove them or knew much about either motor. 

 

Mechanics always drive he worse vehicles on the road

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dukxdog

I have a 2016 Tacoma. Have owned Toyota trucks since 1986. Had a 2009 before this one now and 2005 prior to that.

 

They downsized the motor from 4.0L to 3.6L. No better fuel economy and now gutless. About all I tow is my duck boat or snowmachine trailer. Mileage drops to 12mpg towing and struggles with any wind. 17mpg daily driving.

 

This one squeeks & rattles. Tires wore out at 36,000then I put on Michelins. I just turned 40K on odometer. I only keep my little truck to 95K then sell it off for a new one. I can't wait to get rid of this one. It just has no power or go. It's the TRD OffRoad long bed. I don't off road it or rough it up. It's just a turd.

 

I may look at the Colorado Diesel after they are out a year or so. Just been disappointed in my last two or three Tacomas.

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Brad Eden

IMG_0201.JPG
 

Mixed reviews on most trucks, of course. Confirms my...not being able to quit this 2006 First Gen Tundra. 208k hard miles and a few years of plowing our airstrip driveway. It has its share of bumps and bruises, and rust and dents, but when I turn the key it starts and purrs like a kitten, and rides like a luxury car.

 

 

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Rogue Hunter

Wish I'd had gotten that model when they came out.

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Brad Eden
28 minutes ago, Rogue Hunter said:

Wish I'd had gotten that model when they came out.

They started sprinkling in in late 1999, but 2000 is considered the first year for the First Gen Tundra. Before that there was a T-100. But rumor has it Toyota was forced to change the name to Tundra due to Ford being unhappy since T-100 was too close to F-150. I bought a new 2000 Tundra with the double cab (not the full 4 door like my 2006.). They did a minor facelift in I think 2005 where they raised the truck along with a few other things. You can tell the difference by looking at the tailgate. If there is a groove along bottom that’s the newer 2005-2006. They have a higher stance. They stopped production in 2006 and blew up the size of Tundra to compete with American brands in 2007 and in an attempt to gain traction in the working truck market, and at the same time increased the size of the Tacoma. Many feel the First Gen Tundra especially the last year/2006 was the best everymans truck ever made.

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GLS

Brad, which engine you have in the '08 Tundra?  Gil

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Brad Eden
1 minute ago, GLS said:

Brad, which engine you have in the '08 Tundra?  Gil

I think it has the 4.7L V-8. Only thing I had done to engine was to have the serpentine and all other belts replaced less than a year ago.

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GLS

Despite not having a timing chain but a belt, the 4.7 is among the champs of Toyota engine longevity.  It was been used across the Toyota board in Land Cruisers, Lexus, Tundra and Sequoia.  I've the same engine in my '03 Sequoia. I got lucky with mine.  I had asked a dealership service rep if it had a chain or belt and he told me "chain."  At 175K I checked again and about spit nails and had the belt changed.  I'm at 225K.  The 4.7 has turned a million miles in a handful of Tundras.  The serpentine is exterior on the block running the alternator, AC, etc. and not the timing belt which is internal controlling camshafts.  The 5.7L has a timing chain and doesn't need replacement. If you didn't have to have a timing belt replaced, maybe you have the 5.7 instead.  If you had a timing belt replaced, they would have also changed out the water pump. Gil

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Greg Hartman
1 hour ago, Brad Eden said:

 Many feel the First Gen Tundra especially the last year/2006 was the best everymans truck ever made.

 

I must agree.  I had a 2004 1st gen and it was the best truck I've ever owned, before or since.  Had to get rid of it when my wife got sick, because I couldn't get her out of the wheelchair and into the truck - too high and doors too narrow.  Otherwise, I'd probably still have it.

 

 

Truck - 2.jpg

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Brad Eden
20 minutes ago, GLS said:

Despite not having a timing chain but a belt, the 4.7 is among the champs of Toyota engine longevity.  It was been used across the Toyota board in Land Cruisers, Lexus, Tundra and Sequoia.  I've the same engine in my '03 Sequoia. I got lucky with mine.  I had asked a dealership service rep if it had a chain or belt and he told me "chain."  At 175K I checked again and about spit nails and had the belt changed.  I'm at 225K.  The 4.7 has turned a million miles in a handful of Tundras.  The serpentine is exterior on the block running the alternator, AC, etc. and not the timing belt which is internal controlling camshafts.  The 5.7L has a timing chain and doesn't need replacement. If you didn't have to have a timing belt replaced, maybe you have the 5.7 instead.  If you had a timing belt replaced, they would have also changed out the water pump. Gil

I’ll check and see when I’m home from a short trip. I was getting some noise from belts and my mechanic thought it was just the tensioner. But once he got into engine was shocked that I hadn’t had the serpentine or timing belt(?) changed before 200k. Once he had all that front of engine apart he changed out all other belts and such. Not sure if he replaced water pump. As you can see I stopped doing my own repairs after a couple VW Bugs and an old International Scout II...

 

I honestly can’t think of anything else done to engine besides oil changes every 3-5k mike. I have had to replace struts, leaf springs, brakes of course, and the biggest thing was the steering whatchamagiggy...the big unit under front end that controls the fluids etc. Rust has taken its toll up here in the Northeast and it had a recall scaling and frame coating around 8 years back, but still had a soft spot near front left that my mechanic cleaned out and welded in a strip of steel. (I will repeat from a previous thread, no truck is immune to road salt and rust, and my mechanic has a dedicated bay to undercoat and repair car and truck frames. There is always a Ford or a Chevy or a Dodge or a Nissan or a GMC or Toyota up on the lift when I stop by.)

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GLS

Moons ago, I spent a couple of months at Fort Polk learning to be a killer of M151 jeeps, as a "Light Wheel Vehicle Mechanic", 53B.  One of my innate skills was the ability to bog down a Multi Fuel Duece and Half on a paved parking lot.  I have just enough remaining mechanical skills to do more harm than good on a vehicle.  I can write checks, however.  Gil

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Flush
1 hour ago, GLS said:

 If you didn't have to have a timing belt replaced, maybe you have the 5.7 instead.  If you had a timing belt replaced, they would have also changed out the water pump. Gil

 

The only V8 offered in the first generation Tundra (2000-2006) was the 4.7, all of which had a timing belt. No idea when or if Brad had his timing belt replaced, but it definitely has a timing belt. The second generation Tundra that came out in 2007 was initially offered with either the 5.7L (timing chain) and the 4.7L (timing belt). Later in I believe 2010 they replaced the 4.7L with a 4.6L that was based on the 5.7L design and the 4.6L also had a timing chain.

 

I personally also had several of the first generation Tundras and they were great hunting trucks. They got no better mileage than a larger domestic truck, while having less capability, but for me at the time they were a really nice size.

 

Fun fact about the first generation Tundras. The full crew cab 4-door versions were not just longer than the extended cab (little suicide rear doors) models, the crew cab models were actually several inches wider as well. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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