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Jazz4Brazo

Recovery Gear...Who's packing it?

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whiskyjack

I carry an axe, shovel, tow strap, heavy duty rope, bottle jack, a few 2 foot pieces of 4x6 planking and a come along.

With most of my hunting being on dry, open prairie, I carry a fire broom, fire exstinguisher, 5 gallons of H2O in a jug, rake and 

one of those back pack wildland fire fighter water pumps aka  a "pi## pack. Most ranchers here require the

broom, shovel, rake, 5 gallons of H2O and exstinguisher. They love to see the pi## pack, rarely get turned away from access when they see it.

Jeff

 

 

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GSPpurist

I have a winch on the truck, extra lengths of recovery straps, Shackles, Shovel.  I also keep my 1200 g thinsulate waders, leather gloves.   The waders are for winter, because just my luck to get stuck on the way to work.  I have never been able to recover my vehicle without kneeling or crawling under my truck.  

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Rogue Hunter

Whiskyjack, will you discribe this fire broom for me, never heard of it before. thanks

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whiskyjack
On 4/6/2020 at 5:14 AM, Rogue Hunter said:

Whiskyjack, will you discribe this fire broom for me, never heard of it before. thanks

 

Sure thing. They are similar to an old style kitchen straw broom but are made of a fire retardant material.

They are designed to sweep at the edge of a grass fire or under brush and deadfall etc. getting at and removing hot spots.

I buy them at Kost Fire Safety here in Alberta but I suspect any place that sells fire fighting/safety gear would carry them.

Another source might be farm supply businesses.  www.thefirestore.com carries them in the US for under $20.00

I found them on the site at the bottom of the first page.

Very handy item to have. Lots of ranchers, farmers and oil/gas trucks run around with them as standard kit.

Jeff

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jeff88
On 3/1/2020 at 12:13 AM, bruski said:

4WD does not mean you can go everywhere.

All it means is when you get stuck it will be in a far worse place than with a 2WD.

See above. 2WD in, 4WD out.

This^

Only time I've ever been stuck and needed help getting out is in TX of all places.  Decades on Northern two-tracks, recovered strip mine trails, in snow and other bad conditions, not stuck once with 4wd low range.  Even with i4wd low range on a not-too-steep grade in a TX Nat'l Forest I got stranded by some very deep, amazingly slick mud.  It took a farm tractor to get me out.  Down that hill I went in 2wd never to get back on my own.  

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bigjohnsd

My '19 Ridgeline is not much of an "OffRoad" outfit, there just isn't much ground clearance.

 

That said, I always have a Tow strap, a set of HD Jumper Cables, a spare key. a shovel, and a first aid kit stowed in the Trunk.

I have a cut-down Horse Stall Pad in the back as a bed mat and have used it as a traction mat before.  

 

The Tow strap has never been used to unstick the Ridgeline but I have pulled some well stuck Diesel 1 ton 4wd trucks out of some mud holes on two-track roads they shouldn't have tried to go down.

 

My worst "Stuck" was back in about 1970 when my then Girlfriend and I took my '61 Ford Falcon Sedan Delivery down a muddy two track trying to get to a large field of Snow Geese in the Central Valley of California near Meridian CA.  I slid off the road into a wet plowed field.  Had to use silhouette decoys under the bumper jack to lift the car, push it off the jack towards the road, rinse and repeat.  It took us several hours but we turned the vehicle 180 degrees and got out on our own,  Both covered in mud from head to toe.  I think I recall a coed shower, but I am old and my memory is failing.....or my imagination may be fertile!

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Dogwood

NOCO Genius

 

Surprised this hasn't been mentioned. I've used mine a bunch this winter.  One solid charge is good for at least 4-5 jumps and it really holds a charge well.

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jeff88

Here's a not-getting-stuck story.  We had an '87 Saab 900S 5 sp.  From Thanksgiving to April 1 it ran with 4 Gislaved snow tires and I took it on many a two-track or unpaved forest road in W PA.  Hunting one Saturday in The Thornapples cover in the late season I drove down a two-track for a couple of miles off a dirt road in the mtns.  As I was pulling into a spot near the cover there was a 4wd pick-up with a couple of other hunters gearing up.  We had a nice talk, they were going muzzle-loading so we decided where we'd hunt.  About an hour into my solo trek in some really good ruff cover it started to snow really hard with those big, thick flakes.  By late morning I decided to make it a half-day in that spot and head to another cover as it was still really coming down.

 

A little after noon I got got to the parking spot with a ruff and bunny in the bag, the two other hunters were there too.  They decided to stick around a while if I came back and needed help getting out.  Pretty cool of them I'd say.  It was still really coming down, the Saab had over 3" on it already.  I started the engine and got the snow brush going on the roof and windows letting it warm up a bit.  Noticed they could not get their truck started.  The battery was dead as a door knob nor did they have jumper cables.  I had the cables and maneuvered the car next to the truck and gave them a jump.  Their truck started right up.  Once the truck started you could tell the parking lights had been left on.  None of us noticed when we headed out.  I followed them out of the two track, when we hit the dirt road they followed me to a gas station about 15 miles away I knew was open that could do a battery/system check.  Then the three of us hit a spot for lunch.  In a  heavy snow fall a little Saab rescued the 4wd pick-up in the wilds of W PA.   I can't think of any car I've owned that did not have jumper cables in the truck.

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Jazz4Brazo

Ye

9 hours ago, Dogwood said:

NOCO Genius

 

Surprised this hasn't been mentioned. I've used mine a bunch this winter.  On solid charge is good for at least 4-5 jumps and it really holds a charge well.

 

Yep have a version on board as well as heavy gauge battery cables...good call.

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GLS

I've recently updated my recovery gear to include two saws.  A smaller folding Fiskars 10" limb saw and an old Warranted Superior One Man Cross Cut Logging Saw.   I turkey hunt in a river bottom that has a road winding to a locked gate and a foot and bike trail.  Because of heavy rains, I've had to cut tops out of trees to drive past the fallen tree on the way to the locked gate.  The Fiskars has been up to the task, but recently I ran into a tree that was too big to cut with the folding saw.  The Cross Cut would have definitely handled the job.  I'll order a sharpening kit to re-joint the saw and a top handle for it.  The problem area is out of cell coverage and so far the tree falls have been on the way in and not out, but the larger saw may hopefully help should a tree block the way out.

Cross Cut Logging Saw.jpg

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Cooter Brown
1 hour ago, GLS said:

I've recently updated my recovery gear to include two saws.  A smaller folding Fiskars 10" limb saw and an old Warranted Superior One Man Cross Cut Logging Saw.   I turkey hunt in a river bottom that has a road winding to a locked gate and a foot and bike trail.  Because of heavy rains, I've had to cut tops out of trees to drive past the fallen tree on the way to the locked gate.  The Fiskars has been up to the task, but recently I ran into a tree that was too big to cut with the folding saw.  The Cross Cut would have definitely handled the job.  I'll order a sharpening kit to re-joint the saw and a top handle for it.  The problem area is out of cell coverage and so far the tree falls have been on the way in and not out, but the larger saw may hopefully help should a tree block the way out.

Cross Cut Logging Saw.jpg

I found a 48" Disston at a flea market and it's so sharp it throws 6 inch long chips that look like noodles--don't know if it wasn't used much or if somebody who knew what they were doing sharpened it.  If you look closely you can still see the Disston etch on the blade.  You can tell from the sound it makes when you cut it's sharp.  Fun to use (for a while)!

 

saw.jpg.2549fb48e9cc3b0a773dd5934afd5cfb.jpg

 

Here's the USFS guide to crosscut saw sharpening and use if you don't already have it:

 

USFS Crosscut Saw Manual

 

 

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GLS

CB, Thanks.  I hadn't seen the booklet.  That's a cool saw you have.  I'd rather have one of those in the back of the truck to clear the way than a gas leaking chain saw.  Unless someone else came by with a chain saw...

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Cooter Brown
9 hours ago, GLS said:

CB, Thanks.  I hadn't seen the booklet.  That's a cool saw you have.  I'd rather have one of those in the back of the truck to clear the way than a gas leaking chain saw.  Unless someone else came by with a chain saw...

The new Li-ion battery chainsaws would work, given the stability and charge holding of the batteries these days.  But a little bulkier and usually more expensive than a saw like yours, which works amazingly well if set and sharpened properly.  I have a bow saw--the replaceable blade type--in my kit.  I made a blade guard out of a section of hose.

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GLS

CB, I have a 21" bow saw with a replaceable blade that is worthless.  I've had to do a little trail maintenance where I hunt turkeys with my bike and my bow saw's blade is too flimsy.  It twists despite being tightened as tight as the bow allows.  The Fiskars work great, however.  Gil

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Rafterboy

I've got a winch, 2 shovels, strops, a Tirfor, bottle jack, 1/2" jack plate, ground anchor 2 saws and a pair of maxtracks. Still managed to get stuck enough to take 2 1/2 hours to dig out a couple of months ago.... Stuff happens, and then you deal with it. 

 

With regard to the saw, a hardpoint saw takes up very little space and can whip through timber in short order. They are so cheap I don't mind throwing them away when they are blunt.

Bahco 2500XT Hand Saw | Hand Saws

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