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Gardening 2020


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Korthaar

I'll put out onions, carrots, lettuce, spinach and peas at the end of the month. These plants/varieties can take a little frost. I put out warm weather items out the 2nd week of May.  I have a raised bed garden similar to Brad's. I've kept a little journal with the year's garden plan sketched, what crops were planted, and in which beds. I make little observations on successes and failures. It's 15 yrs old now, a little history book.

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Dug up some horseradish from the garden today.  Beef roast with horseradish sauce on the menu for tomorrow night.  

The snow softened up enough today for me to snowblow the garden today. I should be able to plant lettuce, carrots in 5 weeks or so. 

Garden/raised beds still under some snow but it is melting. I won’t even start thinking about the vegetable garden until mid April and won’t start prep or seed sowing until May. Planting transplants e

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BBlizzard18
1 hour ago, Korthaar said:

 I've kept a little journal with the year's garden plan sketched, what crops were planted, and in which beds. I make little observations on successes and failures. It's 15 yrs old now, a little history book.

I started one of those when we moved into our current place five years ago.  Whenever I do something garden related I'll put in an entry, I like to add a short anecdote about that particular day.  It's been very helpful to look back on and also amusing.  I hope my kids or grandkids will find it entertaining someday.  

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Clueless1

Who has a good lead on heirloom tomato seeds? 

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Brad Eden

I had large tilled in ground gardens for 26 years at my old place. The previous owner was an organic farmer no less, so I had good soil to start with. I had epic gardens there. Huge blocks of sweet corn, pumpkin patch etc., etc. The kids set up a vegetable stand at the road and sold vegetables. I’ve only been living in the new place for 6 summers including this one coming up. It’s taken me awhile to understand and get decent results from raised bed gardening. I like the convenience but miss being able to rotitil (Troybilt rear time) organic matter and compost right into the soil. It’s actually more work mixing in compost and such into 4’x8’ beds with a shovel and fork. The Aha! Moment came when I started laying black plastic over the beds for all the transplants. That’s when it started to really take off. It’s about perfect for me and JoAnn and the kids when they visits.

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Alaskan Swamp Collie

Plowing? Rototilling? I keep reading that we are not supposed to disturb the soil other than drilling the seed in. Supposed to be better for the microorganisms. I think it just makes pulling the weeds harder.

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Brad Eden
2 hours ago, Alaskan Swamp Collie said:

Plowing? Rototilling? I keep reading that we are not supposed to disturb the soil other than drilling the seed in. Supposed to be better for the microorganisms. I think it just makes pulling the weeds harder.

Yeah I’ve read that too....and it includes raised beds. “They” say don’t turn over the soil in raised beds. Sorry, I add compost and manure every year and use a 4 tine digging fork to mix it in as deep as I can. Otherwise I’ve found the soil in beds gets packed hard after a growing season and a winter with 4’ of snow on top of them. (I admit Im a rookie with raised beds but so far so good) As far as tilling my in ground gardens at old place. I spread leaves and compost and manure and anything organic on top every spring and rototilled that in. I used the wide row gardening method leaving the width of the Troybilt between rows. I could make passes and clear out all weeds until the vegetables grew so big and leafy that they covered the rows acting as a natural mulch. I used straw mostly to mulch in the rows when plants were small.

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SelbyLowndes

I usually root my tomatoes in December under a cold frame because I have Brandywine plants that are still alive then. This year I did not root any cuttings.  I think I'll wait until after Easter to plant.

 

My dream garden in waiting at my middle GA farm.  I've saved a spot on top of the tallest hill with a mountain view to build a "waiting to die" home for Emily and I.  I'm retired three years but still have a two year term on a local bank board until I'm free to make the move.

 

The home site is on the foundation of an ante bellum plantation home which burned a few years ago before I bought the property.  There is a 500 ft. by 80 foot garden plot in back with a few mature pecans on it now.  I plan to turn it into the garden I've always dreamed of.  I wonder if Emily would object to minding a little produce stand out front to sell the surplus to tourists?...SelbyLowndes

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Chief Paduke
8 hours ago, SelbyLowndes said:

I usually root my tomatoes in December under a cold frame because I have Brandywine plants that are still alive then. This year I did not root any cuttings.  I think I'll wait until after Easter to plant.

 

My dream garden in waiting at my middle GA farm.  I've saved a spot on top of the tallest hill with a mountain view to build a "waiting to die" home for Emily and I.  I'm retired three years but still have a two year term on a local bank board until I'm free to make the move.

 

The home site is on the foundation of an ante bellum plantation home which burned a few years ago before I bought the property.  There is a 500 ft. by 80 foot garden plot in back with a few mature pecans on it now.  I plan to turn it into the garden I've always dreamed of.  I wonder if Emily would object to minding a little produce stand out front to sell the surplus to tourists?...SelbyLowndes

Emily, if she is like Mrs. Chief, would respond like Antionette Lily, when Bronco Billy told her to put the blindfold on so he could spin her on the wheel for the dagger throwing exhibition. 

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Alaskan Swamp Collie

Was that the time she said Bronco Billy I love you??

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Chief Paduke

Yes; Miss Lily’s response rhymed with buckaroo. 

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Clueless1
22 hours ago, Alaskan Swamp Collie said:

Plowing? Rototilling? I keep reading that we are not supposed to disturb the soil other than drilling the seed in. Supposed to be better for the microorganisms. I think it just makes pulling the weeds harder.

 

Wow I had never heard that.  I'm still building soil from red clay though and I put straw, leaves, really anything organic I can get in it yet.  Rototil the old stuff into it in the fall when I can get a dry enough stretch and rototill in spring to break up the clay again.  Otherwise I wouldn't be able to plant anything.  Not sure if I'm doing it right but stuff is growing, for the most part.

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rideold
18 minutes ago, Clueless1 said:

 

Wow I had never heard that.  I'm still building soil from red clay though and I put straw, leaves, really anything organic I can get in it yet.  Rototil the old stuff into it in the fall when I can get a dry enough stretch and rototill in spring to break up the clay again.  Otherwise I wouldn't be able to plant anything.  Not sure if I'm doing it right but stuff is growing, for the most part.

I've been back and forth on the till/no till gardening theory.  I used to double dig and amend and then read about not tilling and tried that but found the ground was just too darn hard.  I have a high clay content as well and then in the floods we had in 2013 I lost a good part of my topsoil so I'm still trying to rebuild that.  I figure do what works for your site.  The best garden I have ever had was the year I stockpiled all my compostables and then built a big pile with the saved material and lots of fresh manure right in the middle of my garden.  A few weeks in it was reduced in height by 1/3 and by spring it was wonderful.  I spread it out over the whole garden, fished out the big chunks that didn't fully compost and then hand turned it into the ground.  Fantastic year for the veggies.  Unfortunately I lost my source for free fresh manure.  We used to get it from a goat dairy.  It was great because it was mixed with straw from the bedding areas.  Too bad they closed down.

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Alaskan Swamp Collie

The "experts" say that the anerobic bacteria suffers when you turn the soil and breaking up the surface allows the moisture to evaporate faster. It supposedly helps to coat seeds like peas and beans in a slurry of microbes(?) when you plant. Not sure, I grew up turning manure and straw into the garden every spring. I also hear that you don't need to use commercial fertilizers on the garden or lawn. I don't mind the lawn not growing as fast, but would like the best growth in the garden. Tried some organics like fish meal, but the dogs went ape over that and it brought in bears. Would like to find some old fashion cow cr%p.

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