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1971snipe

Both of my pear trees get this leaf curl with brown edges, even the new leaves are already showing it.  Some leaves curl up, and some curl downward.  The trees are fertilized conservatively and watered, and are occasionally sprayed with some sort of "cide" from a local nursery.

One tree is a biscamp, the other a pineapple pear.  I planted them in 2015 and they bloom but never produce fruit.  Each year I say I'm going to dig them up and plant something else, and friends always say to give them another year.

But this year is it then I'm done.  I'll replace one, and then see how the one left responds.  Sort of an encourager Les autres.  

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Dug up some horseradish from the garden today.  Beef roast with horseradish sauce on the menu for tomorrow night.  

The snow softened up enough today for me to snowblow the garden today. I should be able to plant lettuce, carrots in 5 weeks or so. 

Garden/raised beds still under some snow but it is melting. I won’t even start thinking about the vegetable garden until mid April and won’t start prep or seed sowing until May. Planting transplants e

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Alaskan Swamp Collie
6 hours ago, BBlizzard18 said:

I suppose that’s one of the problems growing hybrids, you rely on the company who owns the patent and produces the seed.  I’m not sure what happens to these hybrids, like your planet pepper, when they disappear. The “intellectual property” likely sits in a file somewhere collecting dust.  Maybe experiment with some heirloom varieties that have similar characteristics.  You could always create your own hybrid! That would be cool.  
 

 

Hmmm Create my own hybrid. Well it looks like I will have the time. Gonna have to research that.

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First garlic sprouts popped up in the last day or so - planted mid-November last year :

 

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Ruger 1

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On 3/8/2020 at 11:10 AM, Alaskan Swamp Collie said:

Plowing? Rototilling? I keep reading that we are not supposed to disturb the soil other than drilling the seed in. Supposed to be better for the microorganisms. I think it just makes pulling the weeds harder.

Have you considered those tiller attachments on/for gasoline weed trimmers?

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Earliest may asparagus  has ever ever emerged in my garden .  Have 4 50ft rows and eat it as much as three times daily for several weeks!  Also makes my wife’s bridge clubs happy!

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Alaskan Swamp Collie
3 hours ago, terrym said:

Have you considered those tiller attachments on/for gasoline weed trimmers?

Haven't thought about those. Gotta be easier than the manual hoe. Would still have time to get something, been down in single digits at night and only 20's for the high. That said the rhubarb started popping up.

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Alaskan Swamp Collie
5 hours ago, 61bhs said:

Earliest may asparagus  has ever ever emerged in my garden .  Have 4 50ft rows and eat it as much as three times daily for several weeks!  Also makes my wife’s bridge clubs happy!

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Man I love asparagus. However it doesn't seem to like me as well. I keep trying to grow some up here and I can make it survive, but not thrive. I've got a few plants that come up every year, but are as big around as pencil lead. Think that might be all I'm going to get. That said I kept my cherry orchard going for years with nothing and last year I got a reasonable crop so I guess it could happen.

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On 3/8/2020 at 11:10 AM, Alaskan Swamp Collie said:

Plowing? Rototilling? I keep reading that we are not supposed to disturb the soil other than drilling the seed in. Supposed to be better for the microorganisms. I think it just makes pulling the weeds harder.

Apparently, rototilling every year can destroy all the beneficial micro organisms, etc in the soil. However, turning over your soil by hand does much less damage. First couple years of gardening here I would borrow my dad's rototiller every spring to turn it over. Now I turn it over by hand most years. Probably been 3 years since I rototilled it. I've found that if I rake and turn it over a bit in late Fall and then again in Spring it's pretty easy to manage without the tiller. Each weekday when I get home from work I also try to weed one row during the growing season. Doesn't take long each evening and better success than spending a couple hours every weekend doing the whole thing. I use my grass clippings too as mulch and that really helps cut down on weeds too.

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Brad Eden

As a I’ve droned on about in the past. I had large vegetable garden plots at the old farmhouse and roto tilled  as deep as the tines could go with my Troybilt Horse Rear tine tiller. Every year for 26 years...tilling in leaves, and compost and tilling under old crops and prepping for the spring summer planting and growing season. We had so many vegetables we had a vegetable stand out at the road that the the kids would tend. 3-4 cukes for a buck, bags of beans, onions, pumpkins, squashes, etc. and sweet corn if the coons hadn’t wiped them out. I hand turn the soil with my raised beds at this place. I like it but so far the beds pale in comparison to my old in ground gardens. 
 

Although I did get some good stuff last year.

 

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I had great success when I tilled every year. Part of the reason I started following the whole avoid tilling every season thing was out of convenience (aka laziness) because it was a bit of a PIA to haul the big tiller back and forth each year from my dad's. Kinda in the market for a used one this year and I'm sure I'll go back to tilling each season. No reason not to since I can add so much good compost, etc anyway.

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blanked

How do you keep the deer, hogs, bears etc from tearing up the gardens

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Alaskan Swamp Collie
4 hours ago, blanked said:

How do you keep the deer, hogs, bears etc from tearing up the gardens

Moose and bear are my main issues. I have a 6 foot fence around everything I don't want eaten. Summer isn't so bad, winter is horrible on the fruit trees and berry bushes. Moose eat everything. For the fruit trees I get a 20 foot panel of concrete mesh(6x6) and wrap it around the trees. It's 6.5 foot tall and doesn't have to go to the ground. It's stiff enough that they can't crush it. 

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BBlizzard18

My biggest problem has been woodchucks.  They’ll flatten a broccoli bed in a couple days, they also like kale, spinach, lettuce, and beans.

Deer target the fruit trees, 6 foot fence around the young ones or there would be nothing left.  Rabbits have heavily pruned a few very young fruit trees. Bear only steal my bird feeders if I leave them out too long, I learned my lesson.  Though, I do have raspberries now and wonder if they’ll come after those. 
 

I’ve had tomato hornworms the last two years, one will defoliate an entire plant in less than a week if left alone.  The things will get as big as a hot dog.  Best defense I’ve found is to check the plants once a day, and feed the offenders to the chickens.  

 

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Tilled a 25x75 spot behind the house Friday, again Saturday 90 degrees from the night before, and again last night at a 45 degree.  Thinking I got all the roots cut up.  I sure miss my place that was sandy ground and not a rock on it.  Will add a couple loads of composted manure/hay/whatever else is scraped up by a few rancher buddies in the coming weeks, and then start some planting.  Wife is always happy to see 5 gallon buckets of tomatoes start showing up....

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Alaskan Swamp Collie

Snowshoe hares were a problem around here a few years ago. Ate everything. Had a brilliant idea and had a friend give me a bunch of old gill net . Stretched it along the fence and it conformed to the uneven ground. Figured the little buggers wouldn't be able to get through that. Well it seems that their heads and salmon heads are the same size. Tried to make it work, than a great horned owl decided to take a live rabbit for lunch that was caught in the net.After I straightened that mess out the net came down.

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