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mccuha

Old lumber

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mccuha

I have an old barn on my place. It’s been here I’m guessing since the late thirties to maybe forties.  About 2 years ago a huge oak fell on the very back side of the barn.  Up until then it was pretty solid. Even after the tree fell on it for the most part it was still standing but was enough damage to render it unrepairable. One thing that helped it stand was the intire right side was packed from floor to roof with old lumber.  Primarily rough sawn 2x4’s but a mixture of all rough sawn 1x4, some 2x6’s, two really nice 4x8 heart pine beams, a bunch of ship lap siding and other odd and end pieces. Most of the lumber is 8- 12ft long. Some longer.    So my question.

 

 Any of you guys know if there is value in any of this and if so do you have any knowledge as to what I could sell some of this for. 

 

I did did end up pulling off enough 2x6 rafters to use in building me a covered area on my back patio and a lean to, to put my boat and other items.  There is still a ton of wood left. Unfortunately some of it has rotten 

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Speaks

Depends on wood species and quality. I worked at a company that specialized in turning old reclaimed lumber into super expensive flooring. Sourcing was mostly northern midwest  but the overall market was similar. Money is generally in the processing not raw materials but it depends on what you have. Its almost certainly worth enough to salvage though. If it was local I would love to get a look at it. Pm me if you want any more detail

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Two Barrels

I bet there is a company near Charleston, Savannah, or Atlanta that could turn that old lumber into high dollar bespoke furnishings for their clients.  Really depends on the species.  Heart pine will get their attention.  Maybe do a search for “reclaimed lumber” or “reclaimed building materials”.

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Speaks

Try contacting these guys, this is the company that I worked for years ago. Dont know if it would interest them but I hauled some long distances for them for good lumber back in the day. If nothing else they are real honest and will tell you what you have. https://mrtimbers.com/about/our-showroom/  I live not too far from them and could facilitate an introduction if you dont hear back from reaching out. 

 

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mccuha

All the lumber I have is pine.  A lot of it is yellow pine from around here but I’d bet that there is some that is long leaf pine.   I know some of this wood came from some old houses, probably some mill houses.  I have pulled out the lumber that I know is heart pine because that’s the money stuff.  A friend of mine came over a few weeks ago and got a few pieces of old pine flooring. He sanded it down and that stuff is fine.    I’ll have to do some looking around the coast.   I actually have heart pine flooring in my house as well my stair casing , mantle and exposed beams. That was expensive back 20 yrs ago.   The wife has put it on FB.  I’m hoping someone will come get some of it.  I have no where to store it and hate to see it go to waste.  

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Mike da Carpenter

Not only the rough sawn lumber you have inside the barn is valuable, but depending on how much barn is still salvageable, the barn is valuable too.  Might luck out and get someone to pay you to remove it all.

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mccuha
22 minutes ago, Mike da Carpenter said:

Not only the rough sawn lumber you have inside the barn is valuable, but depending on how much barn is still salvageable, the barn is valuable too.  Might luck out and get someone to pay you to remove it all.

I’ve tried that.  So far no takers

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mccuha
6 minutes ago, WyomingArt said:

Try this contact in Missouri: https://www.elmwoodreclaimedtimber.com/connect-us/sell-us-reclaimed-building-materials    Don't know anything about them. Just popped up on the I-net.

 

If that doesn't work, I know a guy who reclaims barns for old lumber, but he's about 2000 miles from you. 

Thanks.  I’m going to use some of it for my own personal use.  Wife is advertising on FB. well see where that goes.  

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spring

There was a large auction of old heart pine lumber a couple of weeks ago which had a very organized inventory of about every kind of board and beams someone could want. Take a look at the lots of timber they sold and compare that to what you have. Their selling prices could give you an idea of the market value. 

 

 

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max2

I always hate to be a Debby Downer but over the years I have heard  a number of folks state that they wanted to sell their old barn . EVERY-person was disappointed in the offers. On the other side of the coin every person I ever knew that made a purchase on the other end .Re-sale -claims - were it was boo-koo expensive per board foot.  If I was to try and sell an old barn I might consider taking it down myself. Clear all nails & stack it for re-sale. 

Again ~ JMHO

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RuffChaser

Barnwood around here for the siding boards goes for about $3.50-$8.00 /sqft depending on where you buy it. Solid beams are $2.50-$6.00 /board foot. We use some in our house as an accent and will be using more soon when we remodel our kitchen and finish the dry bar area of our basement. Good luck to you getting rid of it. If I lived closer I'd come grab some and throw some money your way for it.

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bigdog MN

Fellow that retired a couple years ago works for a guy that goes out and tears down old wooden buildings to reclaim the wood. Sounded like they were pretty busy so there must be a strong demand at least in MN.

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GLS

Heart pine can be milled for flooring and it has value.  Problem is nails destroying mill saw blades.   There's at least one company in Savannah that specializes in reclaimed heart pine lumber, buying and selling.  My in-laws in Jefferson County took down an old dilapidated ancestral shotgun home and had the wood milled for flooring in their home.  It turned out beautifully.   A late friend bought a 1800s hunting lodge in Garnett SC out of a Resolution Trust bankruptcy sale and he and his wife did most of the restoration themselves.  He was able to sell the heart pine from cabins on the property to pay off his mortgage.  The house was featured in Southern Living decades ago.  Most the of heart pine harvested in the coastal plain of the SE ended up in the north in factories and mills.  There were some published accounts of the demolition of the historic Domino Sugar mill in Brooklyn wherein the heart pine used in its construction was reclaimed into thousands of board feet.  The Brooklyn Bridge rests on tons of heart pine for support.  It's great stuff and a great account of the destruction of the south's longleaf forests is in Janisse Ray's Ecology of a Cracker Childhood.

Here are two great documentaries on the Longleaf forest.  The Mississippi one has some old film clips of virgin stands.  The Georgia one has two of my hunting partners seen quail hunting in the Georgia video.:

https://video.gpb.org/video/georgia-public-broadcasting-secrets-longleaf-pine/

 

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SelbyLowndes

After the lumber market took out the northern forests they moved south for the 'endless' sea of yellow pine that stretched along the coasts from the Carolinas to Texas.  Longleaf yellow pine supports an entire ecosystem which sadly is mostly gone down here.  Current efforts to encourage longleaf reforestation seem mostly aimed at pulp and lumber production rather than recreation of that ecosystem...SelbyLowndes 

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