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Brad Eden

OFFICIAL 2020 Gardening Thread

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bigjohnsd

The seeds in SWMBO's Raised bed have sprouted and are peaking through the soil.

Three Tomato plants are in the Whiskey Barrels and looking healthy.

 

On a sadder note, the Robins, 4 babies, that inhabited the nest just outside the back door in a short pine tree have flown the coop so to speak.  

One was found deceased on the back lawn, two still alive are in the front yard on the ground, unable to fly but mother and father are in attendance and feeding them. One remains MIA.

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Clueless1
On 5/24/2020 at 7:01 PM, 1971snipe said:

First tomato of the season. 

 

 

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Sometimes I wish there was a "middle finger" emoji here😁

Man, if you don't love that first tomato of the year there's no sense in gardening. 

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Yukon1

Longstanding tradition in our home that my wife always gets the first cherry tomato of the year. 

The first real tomato gets sliced up and split between us. 

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Cheesy

Weeded the row of blackberries tonight, they're coming out of bloom.  Looks like I won't have a shortage of berries for pie and ice cream.

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Kids planting okra night before last.  60' rows each of okra, 2 varieties of beans, yellow/butternut squash/zuchinni/cucumbers, watermelons/cantaloupe/pumpkins, and sunflowers to go along with the 50 tomatoes and 30+ peppers.

 

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ness
On 5/27/2020 at 8:53 AM, Yukon1 said:

We moved to our new house last fall so this is the first year with the garden. I built two new 4x8 raised beds and planted them Memorial Day weekend. Hopefully they'll be as productive as the beds at the last house. This year we planted tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, bell peppers, cukes, summer squash, two kinds of lettuce, swiss chard, green beans and leeks. 

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Square foot gardener here too. Done it that way since my first garden in 1991.

 

Currently have two 4x8, two 4x4 raised beds with snap peas, tomatoes, peppers, Swiss chard, lettuce, radishes, beets, beans. Also a couple tubs with ground cherries and a bunch of pots with herbs. 

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Had a couple late frosts here -- last one on May 11 (April 15 is the average last frost date here in KC). Damp and cool weather for much of the spring so far. But it made for the best season ever for lettuce. Tomatoes, peppers and beans have finally gotten enough warmth that they're taking off. A spell of 90s coming up now. 

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Spiller

My garden is doing very well, I usually have a few standbys that I plant every year. This year those would be several varieties of tomatoes, several varieties of peppers (both hot and sweet), eggplant, various herbs, a couple types of lettuce, beets, Swiss chard, and peas. I also grow companion marigolds and pansies in among my veggies. I then try various other stuff as suits my whimsy, squashes, beans, cukes, etc. Anyhoo, I have never grown radishes before and I thought I'd try them this year. One of the reasons I figured I'd try them is because you can start them early like peas and beets and I do like radishes even though I don't purchase them all that often. So I bought some seeds and on the package it said there were two ways to sew them, either in rows or you could cast them willy nilly in an area. Being lazy I did the latter. As I read a bit more about growing radishes, I found that they usually will need to be thinned pretty heavily and it suggested that you wait until the leaves are between 2 and 3 inches tall to do that, so you could eat the baby radishes, leaves and all. 'Course I had never seen baby radish greens for sale anywhere let alone eaten them.  It said to pull them and you can use the baby radishes, leaves and the root, and even if there is a little proto radish (about the size of a pea or a peanut) i.e the whole little plant in mesclun or as a substitute for lettuce in sandwiches. It also suggested that you could sauté them whole in butter. Little known to me evidently, baby radishes are used frequently in Europe and cooked or eaten raw as described. I never knew this, cuz usually when I buy radishes in the supermarket or at the farmers market they are already grown.   Well, I am a convert to baby radishes now because I did my thinning and WOW I tried them in salad and on sammichs and sautéed....and them baby radishes leaves and little roots and stems and all are just super.   They are so good I'm planning on staggering them every two or three weeks through the summer so as I have a little supply of baby radish greens.   Who'da thunk it?   Maybe this is common knowledge to some you gardening guys but I had never done it, or even heard of it, or eaten them before, so I thought I'd pass it along so you can try it this year or maybe next.  Like I said I am a convert.

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idcut

We're finally getting some decent warmer weather, so the veges I have planted are finally starting to put some growth on! I have one 20x20' raised bed and it's stuffed with a variety of the usual plants i.e. cucumbers, three varieties of tomatoes, some poblano pepper plants, two rows of carrots, two rows of Walla Walla sweet onions, one hill of zucchini and crook neck squash and six cabbage plants. I planted a couple of hills of winter squash and pumpkins, some tomato plants, cucumbers, zucchini, cabbage, carrots and onions in the large garden at my moms place.....the veges I've planted at that garden is up for grabs from any family member that wants any.

 

I've got 11 blueberry bushes planted and a decent sized raspberry patch, both of which looks like a bumper crop coming on. My Golden Delicious and Anjou pear tree are loaded, with a very meager crop of the Fuji apple and Red Clap pear showing.

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bullseyebill

I'm mostly a tomato and hot pepper garden person with a few other plants thrown in.  Have never had much success with carrots but will try again.  This year doing leeks, radishes, dill (attracts butterflies) and cucumbers.  Also new this year, I'm growing the tomatoes using trellises.  Easier than cages or staking.  We'll see how it goes.

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Spiller

Goodbye Mrs. Durkin, I'm sick and tired of workin'
no longer I'll dig praties, no longer I'll be fooled
as sure's my name is Carney I'll be off to Californy
instead of diggin praties I'll be diggin lumps of gold
 

So growing potatoes in Maine is kinda almost not worth it but I had a 15 by 3 foot bed that I was planning on planting something in... what to plant? So I went down in the basement and in the corner there was  a bag of last winters old praties from last year, and they were all mungy and growing roots and such. The old lady was gonna pitch them in the bin,  so I figured what the hey and I have been out "plantin' praties".   We'll see if we have a few "new potatoes" come summer...actually I like new potatoes the best...

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barna

I decided to go with the cardboard, will see how it goes. Put in 3 cucumber, 13 tomatoes, 2 tomatillo, 27 pepper plants.  Preppers are mostly the hot variety.  A friend was supposed to get me yellow wax Hungarian sweet peppers but his supplier left the starters out overnight when a late frost hit they are all gone. I make lots of fresh salsa and hot sauce.  Also make Hungarian sourdough (fermented) pickles.  Use the same process for the green tomatoes at the end of the growing year to use them all up. Make green ketchup from the tomatillos.  I probably need to can some this year.  

 

I will put in about 10 potato plants (yellow and red) this month, stock up on fresh potatoes for the fall and winter.

 

Barna

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dogrunner

Growing me a salad I trim it every couple days. Got a few others growing too just not ready yet. 

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1971snipe

First batch of picante sauce, way too mild.  I need to add a serrano or two into the next batch.  

 

 

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Two Barrels

This is the first year we have ever had a deer problem.  They wiped out our green beans in one night.  We were able to salvage 1 gallon when we should have had at least 5 gallons.  They have started in on my okra and crowder peas too.  I put up an electric fence and a couple of trail cameras this week.  We’ll see what happens.  I had to have a discussion with my neighbor earlier this spring.  He started feeding them down by the creek that crosses both of our properties late last summer and continued up until late March.  That is why they are even in our area.  I told my wife a few days ago this may be the fall when I shoot deer from the back yard.

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Korthaar

I've struggled mightily with slugs, chipmunks, and early severe heat this  year.  I could barely save my peppers, lettuce spinach and peas, but they are pulling through now. I have never seen so many chipmunks in my life. Must be a cyclical thing. They pull my plants and leave them lay, dig up seeds and eat them, and burrow throughout my beds.  They won't go into my live traps, so more insidious methods were deployed.  I have found success fighting slugs by ringing my peppers with sandpaper collars.

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DD Huntress

Another facet of the versatile breeds. Weeding!

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