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GLS

Glad it's over

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Treerooster

I am pretty addicted to turkey hunting and travel to several states every year, either to extend the season or to have more tags. Just glad it is in the spring as it would interfere with my ruffed grouse/quail/duck hunting addictions in the fall. I go pretty hard for quite a while during the spring season. I get up too early (hate missing a dawn) and stay out too late. Many mornings I have a 2:30 am wake up. I have woken up in my camper and it has taken me a full 5 minutes just to remember what state I am in. I kid about it, but there is some truth to the fact that I think napping is a skill hard core turkey hunter needs.

 

There have been mornings when it is raining hard that I have been thankful for just so I can sleep in. I have also just taken a morning off now and then to recharge my batteries. I think that helps me be a better/smarter hunter. I do make more mistakes when a grind too hard at it.

 

When the season ends I am happy to finally sleep in, but in a day or two I am ready to get back at it...if only I could.

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Tim Frazier
21 hours ago, mccuha said:

I just hunt our property for turkey.  I’m surrounded by thousands of acres of usnf land but I only hunt our property.  Under normal circumstances I have more than enough land and birds to chase.  I don’t care to stretch the season out. I’m generally limited by the first week of the season.  Then I start crappie and bream fishing.  Last season was the worst I’d ever experienced, well this season topped that.  I called in a couple birds the first week and never fired a shot.  I’d decided to not take any birds this year due to our low population.  I’m glad it’s over now I can get the depressing no.s out of my mind 

Very similar for me.  I only hunt our property and have pretty much been able to have some excitement every year since our season was opened in 2002.  I still have not seen a bird on our place this year, the first time since the late 90s, but others have.  Then on Saturday my youngest daughter and I went out and we had two birds gobble for over an hour in the fog.  We never saw them, I suspect partly as they would have had to cross a flooded creek and back road, but it was great to know there were birds nearby and that the few hens that had been seen would get bred.  So here is to a dry, warm spring and the hope for a better year next spring!

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Brad Eden

Thought I’d tag onto this Topic. The wild turkeys in my immediate area have decided it’s over. Completely close mouthed. Even birds strutting for hens won’t respond to any calls. That can change, but right now it’s spot and stalk only. 

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WMassGriff
17 minutes ago, Brad Eden said:

The wild turkeys in my immediate area have decided it’s over. Completely close mouthed.

Same for me the past 7 days. Surprisingly no birds in any fields for weeks either. Will try a few more times to wind down and then start fishing in earnest.

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mister grouse
1 hour ago, Brad Eden said:

The wild turkeys in my immediate area have decided it’s over. Completely close mouthed. Even birds strutting for hens won’t respond to any calls.

 

 Typically this happens every year and every where to varying degrees and is attributed to the birds "being henned up" .  Birds gobble good first couple days pf the season and the effects of hunting pressure shuts it down quickly ,and experienced older hens who might be 4-6 years old, and have heard it all before,  can pick out a bad- human -turkey-call in a nano-second ( or a call they know is not from the local flock sounds) and lead longboats straight away .  

 

However this year the length and extent of the "shutdown" has become epic in many parts of the country  based on what I hear from some darned dedicated turkey hunters l correspond with seasonally.  Far far more silent on gobbling than we can recall in any prior season .  To me it is the gobble that makes it exciting.  Friends say we have "hunted the gobble out of the turkey breed".  

 

 

 

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tut

You may get a second wave.  I think some hens won't take or they will lose nests and start over.  I know I hunted 4 times the last week in Va.  The first 3 times I didn't even hear a gobble.  That last day (last Saturday) they were fired up again for some reason.  One bird gobbled 77 times on the roost.  

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GLS

The best local hunters that I know abandon aggressive "contest" calling cuts and yelps late season and depend on soft clucks, purrs, leaf-scratching and patience.  Most won't call until the bird leaves the limb.  This is best illustrated by a buddy sitting under a late season bird from dark until 1130 a.m. when it finally flew down.  It was only then he made the first soft cluck.  During his wait, he heard other hunters drive up, hoot , crow, yelp and leave.  I would rather lie in a dentist chair undergoing a root canal than do what it took to take that bird.  Gil

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WMassGriff
1 hour ago, GLS said:

The best local hunters that I know abandon aggressive "contest" calling cuts and yelps late season and depend on soft clucks, purrs, leaf-scratching and patience.  Most won't call until the bird leaves the limb.  This is best illustrated by a buddy sitting under a late season bird from dark until 1130 a.m. when it finally flew down.  It was only then he made the first soft cluck.  During his wait, he heard other hunters drive up, hoot , crow, yelp and leave.  I would rather lie in a dentist chair undergoing a root canal than do what it took to take that bird.  Gil

That would suck the life out of my enthusiasm especially with the attendant swarms of black flies!

From my experience I do agree that soft calling is often best as well as leaf-scratching. Just last week I was working some birds when everything suddenly went silent except for what I thought was the sound from a diaphragm call. Put away my slate and donned an orange bandana to prevent friendly fire. Yup another hunter trying out his repertoire!

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SelbyLowndes

Plus one on the demise of the too long GA turkey season this Spring.  I'm not so much worn out by the getting up every morning as by the self disgust with waking up with my stuff all ready and then going back to sleep.  This makes two years in a row without a bird.  Maybe I'll hit one with the truck...SelbyLowndes

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Coalman

This is my 40th season. Tagged out the first week in NH. Playing hide and seek with Maine right now.
As a NH resident I can't park my truck roadside as ME has a 14 day quarantine requirement.
Even though hunting was deemed essential by the ME Governor and the big neon sign entering ME says "non essential" personal must quarantine the Governor's order says resident hunters.

BS!

 

I called Maine Inland Fisheries and Wildlife. They are offering license refunds.

 

Got a buddy who lives in ME. He is my chauffeur. 

 

I'm glad the gobbling is over in Maine Brad. Please spread the word.

 

We live with the wild turkeys. They have been ROARING at dawn and dusk from the roost. The best is yet to come.

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Brad Eden

I’ve been driving around for two weeks in Maine turkey hunting with my buddy Scott in his GMC truck with NH plates. (my truck too but it was in the shop a fair amount of the first week) Nobody notices and nobody cares, and we haven’t been arrested and put in jail. A lot of states have this 14 day quarantine mandate. Most is a lot of eyewash and there is no concerted effort to catch out of staters crossing the border and doing whatever, at least in Maine. My daughter and her husband from NH visited us in Maine this past weekend. No problems, and they mentioned seeing a huge amount of cars with MA plates coming into Maine on the interstate. These state  mandates are impacting the hunting and fishing plans for a lot of people in a lot of states.

 

From a local newspaper article:

 

To counteract a potentially devastating spring season, the Maine Sporting Camp Association has submitted a proposal to the Department of Economic and Community Development, to be forwarded to the governor, wherein customers arriving from out of the state could “self-certify” that they have quarantined for the requisite 14 days prior to their entry into Maine, allowing them to enter and travel to lodges.

“The [Maine Sporting Camp Association] believes this certification proposal is consistent with the goals to mitigate the spread of the virus. Compliance with COVID-19 guidance is largely based on trust and the MSCA is confident clients of member lodges can be counted on to help mitigate the virus,” the association said in a statement issued May 1.

 

With that said, maybe this Topic can return to the original subject matter of being dog tired during and after a wild turkey hunting season.

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tut

You know the bad thing about it, is I got so used to waking up at 4 am to chase turkey's, I'm still waking up at 4 am and there is nothing to chase.  Our season ended last Saturday.  Least the dogs are happy.  They get their morning breakfast early. 

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Bluegill68

Today is the last day of my hunt in Wisconsin and am am glad its over.  After two days of rest and regular meals I will miss it and suffer a slight depression. 

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Coalman
2 hours ago, Brad Eden said:

With that said, maybe this Topic can return to the original subject matter of being dog tired during and after a wild turkey hunting season.

 

I'll let you know how I feel on June 7th.

 

 

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snakeroll

I hear ya, I love to turkey hunt as much as grouse over pointers and swinging steel but I am glad it's over. Working midnights, and turkey hunting off days sure takes it's toll. I did get my two birds and my son his two birds , got my partner out once for a mid-morning reaping mission. Found a strutter and he got charged by the gobbler dropping him at 50 feet. Hunted 6 days total, I am a firm believer in scouting and roosting birds prior to hunting. 

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