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Looking good Dick! You haven't changed a bit since I last saw you.

 

Good for all of us to be still playing in the dirt and not laying in it.

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Awesome project and great photographs to show it to us. I am impressed. You are lucky to have the space to do it and still have the toys to do it with after your farm auction when you retired.  

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  • 1 month later...

Love reading about this stuff.  Whether it is fish deer birds bees or butterflies it is fascinating how resilient and responsive Mother Nature is. Hats off to all who put in the work.  

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  • 2 weeks later...

F46CFBBB-9D21-4476-9F4F-42B65CC4ECF1.thumb.jpeg.e718bda119292e07d7fe8512d7832d1b.jpegHere is a 1/2 acre upland meadow I put in for my in-laws. It was a field full of ragweed. They didn’t want to use any herbicides so I tilled it about four times during the summer and fall to keep stressing the weeds root systems. It seemed to work pretty good. Not much stuff growing after 3-4 tillings. This is just prior to the last till, seeding and rolling on November 14th. We had a couple good frosts already prior to this. The seed mix (native wildflower and warm season grass mix) is from earnst seeds in PA. I boosted it with native stuff I collected. Hopefully we will see some results this spring. I told my in-laws not to expect much the first year. 

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Huntschool
23 hours ago, upstate said:

F46CFBBB-9D21-4476-9F4F-42B65CC4ECF1.thumb.jpeg.e718bda119292e07d7fe8512d7832d1b.jpegHere is a 1/2 acre upland meadow I put in for my in-laws. It was a field full of ragweed. They didn’t want to use any herbicides so I tilled it about four times during the summer and fall to keep stressing the weeds root systems. It seemed to work pretty good. Not much stuff growing after 3-4 tillings. This is just prior to the last till, seeding and rolling on November 14th. We had a couple good frosts already prior to this. The seed mix (native wildflower and warm season grass mix) is from earnst seeds in PA. I boosted it with native stuff I collected. Hopefully we will see some results this spring. I told my in-laws not to expect much the first year. 

 

Was your warm season prairie grass seeds scarified >  in tact seeds takes an over winter to break the seed coat and then grows the second year in the soil.  Iask this because back in the day a lot of folks thought their seeding was no good and tore it up when in actuality the seed was there and ready to go on "IT'S" schedule.  

 

We took to freezing the seed and thawing it several times before planting and that solved the problem.

 

Just a thought.... 

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3 minutes ago, Huntschool said:

 

Was your warm season prairie grass seeds scarified >  in tact seeds takes an over winter to break the seed coat and then grows the second year in the soil.  Iask this because back in the day a lot of folks thought their seeding was no good and tore it up when in actuality the seed was there and ready to go on "IT'S" schedule.  

 

We took to freezing the seed and thawing it several times before planting and that solved the problem.

 

Just a thought.... 

I frost seeded, so it will be in the ground all winter, so it should be good to go as soon as the soil gets to the right temp. I have some experience with warm season grasses so I’ll let it do it’s own thing and let it build its root system the first year. Its taken some time but I have learned to have patience will my plantings. Thanks for the reminder about the seed though. 

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Huntschool
1 minute ago, upstate said:

I frost seeded, so it will be in the ground all winter, so it should be good to go as soon as the soil gets to the right temp. I have some experience with warm season grasses so I’ll let it do it’s own thing and let it build its root system the first year. Its taken some time but I have learned to have patience will my plantings. Thanks for the reminder about the seed though. 

 

Welcome and good luck.  Looks like you did everything top shelf.

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ElhewAngler

The best of luck.  Please post updates in spring and summer 

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  • 4 weeks later...

From the Bee & Butterfly Fund:

"I’d ask one more thing of you before you go, would you please pass on the following information (below) about the webinar we are hosting this week? These two webinars (the same content for both) explain our program to landowners and encourage them to reach out and develop their own project with us. We’d sure love it if you could help us spread the word by sharing on social media (you can share directly from our FB page) or via email."

 

Register for the Webinar at:

January 26th: https://us02web.zoom.us/.../tZIsfu2vqj0sH9ZxwPQbTPi0U...

January 28th: https://us02web.zoom.us/.../tZMudO...

 

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On 12/31/2020 at 6:19 PM, upstate said:

I frost seeded, so it will be in the ground all winter, so it should be good to go as soon as the soil gets to the right temp. I have some experience with warm season grasses so I’ll let it do it’s own thing and let it build its root system the first year. Its taken some time but I have learned to have patience will my plantings. Thanks for the reminder about the seed though. 

It looks great! How many times will you mow next summer if at all? 

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1 hour ago, 123 said:

It looks great! How many times will you mow next summer if at all? 

It has a cover crop of rye. So it will come up first before the slower growing native wild flowers and grasses. The plan is to mow it pretty high once to knock the rye down and allow the sunlight to get to the good stuff below. Not sure when this will happen, just have to keep an eye on it. 

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15 hours ago, upstate said:

It has a cover crop of rye. So it will come up first before the slower growing native wild flowers and grasses. The plan is to mow it pretty high once to knock the rye down and allow the sunlight to get to the good stuff below. Not sure when this will happen, just have to keep an eye on it. 

Very nice, always fun to learn how folks do things in different parts of the country. I think cover crops reduce the need for mowing to some degree, in my neck of the woods without a cover crop we would like to mow at least twice and preferably three times the first year. Good luck!!

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