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Bees

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Rogue Hunter

I was 18yrs and my brother was a very knowledgable and wise (remember this) 23yrs. My brother worked part time with a local apiarist, and, dated his daughter. Well, one day he gets a call from this retired guy, saying his bees had swarmed to a tree in the yard and asked if we could come over and get them back into the hive?  So, after work the two of us go over to this guys' place. Neither of us had skirts on...bare skinned to the waist. My brother takes a look at the swarm and says, "OK, here's what we'll do. You (me) position this step ladder under the branch, get up on the ladder, reach up and hold it with one hand on either side of the swarm. I'll reach up and snip the branch with the pruning shears, then I'll take the branch from you and move it over to the hive".  "OK", I says. Oh, wise and knowledge brother! So, of course, when he cuts through the branch, he jiggles it and the whole swarm comes falling down on my head and bare shoulders, and down onto a tarp we'd put on the ground! He looks at me, "don't move or they'll sting you". Yeah, I know, thinking to my self. So once they'd all fallen to the tarp, I step back off the ladder, onto the ground. My brother, hyperventilating, say, "You get stung? How many times? We got to get you to the hospital right away!" And, I'm like, "wait...wait". And, I'm thinking, did I get stung? Hmmm, don't feel anything? I'm I in shock? No, No! Stung? Hmmm, no, not once. 

 

All the while, the old retire guy is watching...turning red as a beet..looking like he was going to have a heart attack.

 

So. after all the excitement, we concluded that the queen had fallen to the ground and the bees followed to protect her. Would have been a lot more interesting if the queen had clung to me.

 

TRUE STORY

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Scar

Some more pictures from a recent hive inspection.

 

This shows a partially capped frame.  All that honey will be harvested in September.

capped2.jpg

 

I have always enjoyed playing with fire (or in this instance smoke).

Smoke2.jpg

 

When I die my saved selfies will tell one helluva story!

suit4.jpg

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DD Huntress

I have bees!🐝

20200802_091012.jpg

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dogrunner

For the project I did they were taking honey last week. 

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Irishwhistler

DSC09061_edit_FotorResized.thumb.jpg.c5ce7a5580671de24f8944d5f3d96b36.jpg

~ HAIRY HONEY MAKER ~

 

Mike ☘️🇮🇪🇺🇸

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DD Huntress

Happy national honey bee day!

7769.jpeg

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gwponr

I dig watching the bees, in my garden at my old place I always grew different flowers to attract them. Everything I brought in pots to the new place were devoured in days. The only flowers

that didn't get eaten were my milkweed for the butterflies, Critters don't seem to like my thyme or basil as those were left alone also, but the flowers and vegetables even chili peppers...  GONE!. 

I am planning on getting a couple of hives here in the near future, then the other day in the mail box was a flier from a bee keeper who wants to put hives on my property. I been thinking  about it last couple of days, he would give me plenty of honey but then I am a very much do it yourself kinda guy.  I do have a rugged untouched piece of property though that is going to take a lot of work to be what I wanted it to be.

Funny thing about the milkweed, I have three varieties and in town the monarch butterflies loved it and there were quite a few. I had to keep propagating more of it otherwise the monarch caterpillars ate the plants down to stems. While  at the new place I have a ton of butteries but no Monarchs that I have seen yet, and none of the butterflies here pay any attention to the milkweed.

 

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Scar

Checking my hive yesterday I was fortunate to see a behavior known as "bearding" for the first time.  It was a hot, muggy overcast afternoon and the bees were almost all in the hive.  Some of them were hanging off the base board in a group forming what looked like a beard of bees.  I was initially worried but after some research determined that the behavior is a sign of a happy, healthy hive with plenty of resources.

 

Bearding.jpg

 

 

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sneem

When we lived in Washington state, I would catch salmon in the local rivers. We loved to sit out on the deck and enjoy fresh, grilled salmon. One evening sitting back after enjoying such a meal, one bee or small wasp landed on a plate and started eating some of the small left over salmon pieces. We were fascinated watching it. After about ten minutes it flew away. About ten minutes later a group of the same bees descended on the plate and started devouring the leftovers. Obviously the scout had returned to the hive and rallied the troops. It was fascinating.

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Wildcat

I think I made a rookie mistake? I was trying to divert the honey bee's from my wife's hummingbird feeders. There were only 20-40 the first few days, now there are 100's and I can't keep up with the feeding. Whoops

20200825_120924.jpg

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Irishwhistler

DSC09442_Fotor.jpg 
~ Sweet Stack ~  Honey bees returning to the hive are stacked in flight prior to making entrance into their hive with freshly gathered nectar. The hive is one of many maintained by my buddy Bill and sits on an old New England stone wall on my friend Ruth's property.

Cheers,
Mike ☘️🇮🇪🇺🇸

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Scar
2 hours ago, Wildcat said:

I think I made a rookie mistake? I was trying to divert the honey bee's from my wife's hummingbird feeders. There were only 20-40 the first few days, now there are 100's and I can't keep up with the feeding. Whoops

 

You may know where the hive(s) are located.  If you do not you can track the bees back to their hive(s).  Depending upon the location of the hive you might be able to safely harvest some wild honey for your personal consumption.  Don't try to do so without proper equipment, permission or if it will destroy the hive(s).

 

Just watch the direction the bees are coming to your feeders from and track them back along that line.  A sunny afternoon is the best time to do this as they will be more active during that time.  Be careful but if you move slowly and wear light colors the bees won't see you as a threat and will generally ignore you.  Pay attention to hollow trees, walls of abandoned houses or buildings and other places that have voids protected from the elements.  You will likely hear the hive long before you see it especially if you search on a calm day.

 

If you find the hives post some pictures of them for us.

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Wildcat

Do bees from different hives fight with each other? I have noticed there are two distinct patterns on the abdomen of the bees, the bees with many stripes seem to bite the bees with a dark end on their abdomen (no stripes) and chase them off the plates?

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Scar
20 hours ago, Wildcat said:

Do bees from different hives fight with each other? I have noticed there are two distinct patterns on the abdomen of the bees, the bees with many strips seem to bite the bees with a dark end on their abdomen (no stripes) and chase them off the plates?

 

Yes. The bees you describe are undoubtedly from different hives and will compete for resources.  Some bees will even go into other hives and steal honey directly especially if the hive is in a weakened state.

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Wildcat
1 hour ago, Scar said:

 

Yes. The bees you describe are undoubtedly from different hives and will compete for resources.  Some bees will even go into other hives and steal honey directly especially if the hive is in a weakened state.

Thank you for clarifying that for me Scar. I appreciate your knowledge.

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