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Spam, the hunting/fishing, other (sort of ) red meat

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Felix

I am a closet spam eater.  My mind says I shouldn’t like or eat the stuff but every couple of months, I can’t help myself. 
 

I bought a few extra cans when then pandemic started and the future was a little more uncertain.  Now, with a few cans in the pantry, I doubt I’ll buy more for a year. 

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Bloodhound

 

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Greg Hartman

I like it.  I like canned corned beef hash, too.  It has to be fired hard until crispy.  When stocking for possible lengthy isolation here on the mountain up in February, I got a case of each.

 

Sadly discovered that neither canned delicacy is high on Nancy's list of desirable food.  So, I have a lot of Spam and canned corned beef hash to eat by myself.  Oh well, the good news is that it won't matter if it takes me 20 years to eat it - it will still be good with all those preservatives.

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Wet Dog

Spam is good for breakfast and so is Scrapple. I like them both. Neither are probably very good for you but sometimes I get a craving.

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terc

I love it. It's my typical lunch during hunting season, two sandwiches for me, one for Bella. It seems like most of you like it fried. That is good. But to appreciate the full flavor cut it thick, put it on white bread with some mayo, ( maybe a dose of Lipitor) ,then enjoy.

For a special treat add a thick slice of home grown tomato. 

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salmontogue

Don't all of you know that Spam is a major food group?

 

Perk

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strato-caster

Bacon spam musubi is a favorite around here. Sushi rice, a strand or two of the green tops of a scallion,  bacon spam slowly fried until crispy and slathered in a teriyaki sauce (or better yet, a combo of hoisin thinned slightly with soy sauce and laden with red pepper flakes) with a healthy sprinkle of furikake and wrapped in a sheet of nori. A $5 musubi press from Amazon makes it easier and fun for everyone, especially the kids and teenagers.

 

My financially successful brother is someone who has forgotten his roots (both our parents were born in 1918 and 1919, lived hand to mouth through the Depression and served in WWII) so it was not uncommon as a family growing up to eat liver and onions, bologna or deviled ham sandwiches, Vienna sausages, canned corned beef hash, or SOS or chipped beef on toast as a staple. My father was fond of a bowl of leftover rice, drowned in cold milk and topped with vanilla extract. That was his equivalent of Lucky Charms as a kid. As I grew older, it dawned on me that it wasn't because we had to (my father was a well paid white collar combat systems engineer for the Navy), it was because they liked it, maybe because it was a touchstone to their childhood and a fondness of the past. I carry on the tradition, my brother not so much. 

 

Last summer my niece and I cooked an Asian inspired 4th of July picnic dinner which included Kogi Dogs (A fabled Korean fusion food truck from SoCal's version of the lowly hot dog. Google and try them!!!) and Musubi.  My brother who incidentally spent $60K on his daughter's tuition for Cordon Bleu Culinary School is rather fond of the Kogi Dog, but was rather hesitant about the musubi because it contained" mystery meat" (Spam), which he insinuated was fillers and gut meat and was quite below his blue blooded status. After I countered and put him in his place with the fact that he just happily gobbled down two pig intestine casings stuffed with snouts and a$$holes (actually BS because we use Hebrew National or Nathan's all beef hot dogs), he reluctantly tried the musubi... He pretended at first that "it wasn't that bad", and then you could tell that he actually really enjoyed it. We all took notice that one by one the stack on the plate was slowly disappearing.

 

The ultimate compliment was that when the platter was empty he commented that apparently "somebody must have liked them", and that he would have liked another, as if he had nothing to do with it. He even offered to drive to the market so we could make another batch. Surprisingly he even offered to help make them in the press when we returned from the grocery store. Later that evening, while watching fireworks, he asked several of his guests if they had tried the musubi, and if they had not, told them how much they missed out...  

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dogrunner

It’s cheap won’t  spoil and taste decent especially if cooked. Better than slimy lunch meat after a few days. 

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Sheldrake

Used to eat it on canoe trips. 

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boon hogganbeck

My dad was a Vienna sausage connoisseur.  Always stocked up for camping trips. I’ve eaten them on most of the trout streams of West Virginia. Everyone fought over the center sausage because it tasted less of can. 

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Two Barrels

Fried Spam on toast with mustard makes a good sandwich.  My wife and kids hate it.  I bought two cans back in March.  I told my wife the pantry was not officially “prepped” until we had at least one can of Spam.

 

The barbecue flavor Vienna sausages have been a favorite of mine since I was a kid.  I remember taking them along on dove hunts with my Dad and Uncle.  I would set a can or two on the dash of the truck in the sun.  They would be nice and hot when it was time for a lunch break.  Open the can, spear one with your pocket knife and carefully enjoy.

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Spin
16 hours ago, Wet Dog said:

Spam is good for breakfast and so is Scrapple. I like them both. Neither are probably very good for you but sometimes I get a craving.

I was going to bring up a comparison between spam and scrapple but figured I'd been running off enough on this thread for awhile. Many folks avoid Spam not because of it's taste but simply because of the stigma attached to it as "Hard Times" rations. In Europe nettles are shunned similarly. not because of taste or appearance but from being used as a food of last resort. 

    It's funny how we, as evidently the most intelligent species on this planet, will abandon nourishment while facing malnutrition on the basis of social bias and Fool's Pride.

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SODAKer

Guess it’s time to throw a can of potted meat into the discussion, lol. Potted meat on Wonder bread with a slathering of mayo, those were the days. 
 

I actually served up a small dish with table crackers and crispy baguette slices and folks thought is was a helluva good  Pate. 

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dogrunner

Just cooked me up a batch along with a good cup of coffee ️ 

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kgb

Cubed and fried with scrambled eggs or 3 slices fried for a sandwich with the bread toasted.  Switched to turkey Spam some time ago, now the original just tastes too salty.  Tried the Tocino version, too sweet!!

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